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AW: [gothic-l] Gothic names

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  • Andreas Schwarcz
    _____ Von: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com [mailto:gothic-l@yahoogroups.com] Im Auftrag von r_scherp Gesendet: Dienstag, 05. Jänner 2010 04:30 An:
    Message 1 of 49 , Jan 5, 2010
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      _____

      Von: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com [mailto:gothic-l@yahoogroups.com] Im Auftrag
      von r_scherp
      Gesendet: Dienstag, 05. Jänner 2010 04:30
      An: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
      Betreff: [gothic-l] Gothic names



      Well, you could look into the relevant books to find these reconstructions
      and the etymology of these names, f.i.:



      Ernst Wilhelm Förstemann, Altdeutsches Namenbuch, 2 vols. (Bonn 1900).
      (Supplementary volume to vol.1, Personenennamen by Henning Kaufmann,
      München, Hildesheim 1968)

      Moritz Schönfeld, Wörterbuch der altgermanischen Personen- und Völkernamen
      (Heidelberg 1911)







      Best wishes,

      Andreas Schwarcz



      Hails!

      I imagine someone here has taken the trouble to reconstruct the known Gothic
      names. I would be very interested in this. For example, Theoderic is
      actually Thiudareiks, meaning Ruler of the People. I suppose it won't always
      be possible to ascertain the originals and their meanings, but it always
      productive to give it thought. I am tired of seeing the names in Latin,
      English or Spanish.

      Randulfs





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • o_cossue
      Really interesting. There are just a handful of Germanic names with an initial sigis- theme (according to Förstemann 1900: Sigisbert, Sigisfrid, Sigismeres,
      Message 49 of 49 , Dec 14, 2015
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        Really interesting. There are just a handful of Germanic names with an initial sigis- theme (according to Förstemann 1900: Sigisbert, Sigisfrid, Sigismeres, Sigismund, Sigistricus, Sigisvulth) I can add a Sigesgundia in Galicia in 887), but there are plenty of them with just *segi-, and also with *ses/sis- (including Galician medieval names Sisulfus, Sisericus, Sisvaldus... and Sisuldus, Sisina, Sesinus, Sisilo, Sisbertus, Sesgundia, etc.) So I think that your reasoning can be also applyied to the identification of *sis- as a variant of *sigis-.



        Now, on Rosamunda, etc, the element Maur- present in Maurila was probably taken from Latin Maurentius; Flor- in Floresindus from Florentius (flos ‘blossom’, and so 'to grow, prosper'); Cresc- in Crescemirus from Crescentius (crescere ‘to grow’); fortis in Fortesindus and Gundifortis is Latin fortis ‘strong’... So Rosamunda/Rosemudus can be related to Rosalia, Rosula or Rosina, but there are alternative Germanic etymologies (I concede that they are too many and probably too weak).


        Regards,

        Miguel Costa

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