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Re: Gothic names

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  • gotenfreund
    Randulfs, I have a Gothic etymological dictionary (Holthausen) which includes some reconstructed names. I haven t quite figured out how the author determined
    Message 1 of 49 , Jan 4, 2010
      Randulfs,

      I have a Gothic etymological dictionary (Holthausen) which includes some reconstructed names. I haven't quite figured out how the author determined which ones he wanted to reconstruct, though, since it doesn't seem to include all Gothic names, just a random selection. He does includes multiple possibilities for some reconstructions, however, which is interesting. For example, *Grautungos, *Griutungos, *Grutungos, all for Greuthungi.

      I should mention the book was originally published in 1934, so it's not exactly cutting-edge scholarship perhaps, but the price was right.

      I also like seeing the names in their Gothic form.

      Gotenfreund

      --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "r_scherp" <r_scherp@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hails!
      >
      > I imagine someone here has taken the trouble to reconstruct the known Gothic names. I would be very interested in this. For example, Theoderic is actually Thiudareiks, meaning Ruler of the People. I suppose it won't always be possible to ascertain the originals and their meanings, but it always productive to give it thought. I am tired of seeing the names in Latin, English or Spanish.
      >
      > Randulfs
      >
    • o_cossue
      Really interesting. There are just a handful of Germanic names with an initial sigis- theme (according to Förstemann 1900: Sigisbert, Sigisfrid, Sigismeres,
      Message 49 of 49 , Dec 14 12:31 PM

        Really interesting. There are just a handful of Germanic names with an initial sigis- theme (according to Förstemann 1900: Sigisbert, Sigisfrid, Sigismeres, Sigismund, Sigistricus, Sigisvulth) I can add a Sigesgundia in Galicia in 887), but there are plenty of them with just *segi-, and also with *ses/sis- (including Galician medieval names Sisulfus, Sisericus, Sisvaldus... and Sisuldus, Sisina, Sesinus, Sisilo, Sisbertus, Sesgundia, etc.) So I think that your reasoning can be also applyied to the identification of *sis- as a variant of *sigis-.



        Now, on Rosamunda, etc, the element Maur- present in Maurila was probably taken from Latin Maurentius; Flor- in Floresindus from Florentius (flos ‘blossom’, and so 'to grow, prosper'); Cresc- in Crescemirus from Crescentius (crescere ‘to grow’); fortis in Fortesindus and Gundifortis is Latin fortis ‘strong’... So Rosamunda/Rosemudus can be related to Rosalia, Rosula or Rosina, but there are alternative Germanic etymologies (I concede that they are too many and probably too weak).


        Regards,

        Miguel Costa

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