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Re: Hallo hallo!

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  • Johann von Messer
    Also, can someone please explain to me the very weird (to me) placements of definite articles? In one of my books is the dedication Qenai meinai þizai
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 24, 2008
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      Also, can someone please explain to me the very weird (to me)
      placements of definite articles? In one of my books is the dedication
      "Qenai meinai þizai liuboston" which is obviously "To my dearest
      wife." But that is the definite article doing in there, yet no
      preposition? I have seen this is a few other places such as

      Ahma sa weiha - The Holy Spirit
      Hardeis sa goða - the good shepherd
      "...ibai aufto distairai wein þata niujo þans balgins." - "...lest
      perchance the new wine burst the bottles."


      There's also this that I have trouble grasping from Mark 4:5
      "anþaruþþan gadraus ana stainahamma, þarei ni haibada airþa managa,
      jah suns urrann in þizei ni haibada diupaizos airþos"
      "And another fell on a stony place, where there was not much soil, and
      soon rose up because of not having depth of earth."
      (("and another fell on stony place, where not had soil much, and soon
      rose up because not had deep of soil")) Why is airþa in the genitive
      at the end? Is it because of the phrase 'in þizei?' And if so, why
      does 'in' make the article genitive?

      Also, I'm thinking about translating a Christmas song or two, just for
      the hell of it. Should I do the translated, traditional English
      version of Silent Night or the original 1816 German lyrics?
    • Ingemar Nordgren
      Hi Johann! It is as far I can see not a question of definite article but just a clarification of what yoy mean with the shepher, which shepherd. Hardeis is
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 25, 2008
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        Hi Johann!

        It is as far I can see not a question of definite article but just a
        clarification of what yoy mean with the shepher, which shepherd.

        Hardeis is like Sw. herden already in definite form (herde,-n) since
        it comes in the end, not in front. The good, den gode tells just
        which shepherd, herde. In Sw. accordingly 'herden-den gode'or 'den
        gode herden', but indefinite it is 'en god herde', 'a good shepherd'.
        This is a great similarity between Gothic and Scandinavian languages.

        From a non linguist
        Ingemar


        --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Johann von Messer"
        <furry_von_messer@...> wrote:
        >
        > Also, can someone please explain to me the very weird (to me)
        > placements of definite articles? In one of my books is the
        dedication
        > "Qenai meinai þizai liuboston" which is obviously "To my dearest
        > wife." But that is the definite article doing in there, yet no
        > preposition? I have seen this is a few other places such as
        >
        > Ahma sa weiha - The Holy Spirit
        > Hardeis sa goða - the good shepherd
        > "...ibai aufto distairai wein þata niujo þans balgins." - "...lest
        > perchance the new wine burst the bottles."
        >
        >
        > There's also this that I have trouble grasping from Mark 4:5
        > "anþaruþþan gadraus ana stainahamma, þarei ni haibada airþa managa,
        > jah suns urrann in þizei ni haibada diupaizos airþos"
        > "And another fell on a stony place, where there was not much soil,
        and
        > soon rose up because of not having depth of earth."
        > (("and another fell on stony place, where not had soil much, and
        soon
        > rose up because not had deep of soil")) Why is airþa in the genitive
        > at the end? Is it because of the phrase 'in þizei?' And if so, why
        > does 'in' make the article genitive?
        >
        > Also, I'm thinking about translating a Christmas song or two, just
        for
        > the hell of it. Should I do the translated, traditional English
        > version of Silent Night or the original 1816 German lyrics?
        >
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