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Re: Hello

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  • Pablo
    Hello Fredrik, Thanks a lot for your mail and explanations. You got what I meant, I love to see and detect similarities between languages, and their influence
    Message 1 of 36 , Dec 9, 2008
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      Hello Fredrik,

      Thanks a lot for your mail and explanations. You got what I meant, I love to see
      and detect similarities between languages, and their influence on others. It's a
      hobby that's growing I guess. But your examples were quite good as to picture
      the whole thing.

      Here in the Argentine, where we speak a particular medieval-like Spanish dialect,
      heavily influenced mostly by Italian and to a lesser extent indigenous and English
      expressions, such words are not that uncommon. "Alevoso" is used exactly as to
      depict an abusive situation, while "escanciar" is less often heard, but as it has
      been narrowed enough to mean only "whisky pouring into a glass", I find it logical
      to come from Gothic! Such knowledge of yours tells me that your Spanish
      studies have gone quite beyond the basics. Regarding guante, well, both examples
      match. I'd say anyway is a French loanword, just like "reloj" (horloge,
      "clock/watch").

      Regarding Gutiska Rada (right?), I'd love to receive some basic guidelines for
      Gothic expressions, such as common nouns, salutations, etc. And as to finish:
      What's Gothic for Paul? Could you also translate the adjective "grape-picker"
      (which happens to be my family name in Genoese)? Thanks a lot in advance.

      Best wishes,

      Pablo
      --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Fredrik" <gadrauhts@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi!
      >
      > I'm sorry but I didn't get exactly what you meant but since I've
      > studied spanish have I noticed the gothic influence in it.
      > Sure is that gothic hadn't any great influence, arabic had way more.
      > But there are a few words in spanish from gothic origin.
      > And as you mention also a few names.
      > Among those I would add Alafuns/Alfonso.
      >
      > A word such as alevoso is most probably from gothic, cf. the verb
      > lewjan = betray. And the verb escanciar (which I guess only exist in
      > some dialects of spanish) comes from gothic skagkjan.
      > But about the word guante (cognate to swedish vante) I'm not sure.
      > Is it from gothic or is it a earlier loan from another germanic
      > language. The same word occur in italian as guanto and french as gant.
      > The portuguese word luva could probably come from gothic glofa
      > (cognate to english glove), with the same meaning.
      >
      > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Pablo" <pittaluga@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hello all,
      > >
      > > My name's Pablo, and I'm from Argentina. I'm a PR & Training man,
      > having
      > > Germanic languages as a hobby and interest.
      > >
      > > I've seen Gothic pages where was depicted as the missing link for
      > Germanic
      > > reconstruction, and observing its vocabulary noted that goes
      > halfway Germanic
      > > halfway Latin –due to simultaneous existence I guess-, i.e. "ahwa"
      > (water),
      > > "idjja" (past participle of go, quite similar to Spanish "ido"). My
      > mother tongue is
      > > Spanish, a language that was quite influenced by Visigoth from AD
      > 300 to AD
      > > 700, roughly the Visigoth rule in Spain. But even is Spanish
      > language studies
      > > Visigoth is kind of ignored. You can see the traces in Fernando
      > (Ferdinand),
      > > Rodrigo (Roderick), et cetera.
      > >
      > > I'd love to share thoughts and points of view on Gothic with you
      > all.
      > >
      > > Best,
      > >
      > > Pablo
      > >
      >
    • Friþureiks
      Hi! This comes very late but I answer anyway. I think it would be better with frijaba instead of frije. The word for life is libains (sf) if i m not totaly
      Message 36 of 36 , Oct 22, 2009
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        Hi!
        This comes very late but I answer anyway.
        I think it would be better with frijaba instead of frije.
        The word for life is libains (sf) if i'm not totaly wrong.
        I don't know if giban takes any special case but i'd guess it should be accusative, hence "Ik giba frijaba libain meina" (if dative: libainai meinai)

        --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Claire Knudsen-Latta" <clairemargery@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello the list!
        >
        >
        >
        > I am working on a gift for a friend who is a member of the SCA. My
        > experience is in Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse and am having trouble with the
        > lack of vocabulary in Gothic. Would someone who is more apt with the Gothic
        > language please take a look at the below sentence and, once they stop
        > laughing, point me in the direction of correct grammar. I've got the Gothic
        > above and English below. ((th) is being substituted for thorn, my computer
        > is having a day.)
        >
        >
        >
        > Claire
        >
        >
        >
        > Her kaupo ai(th)am mi(th) Wista-waipam. Ik giba frije liban meinai jah
        > andbahti fri(th)au jah hriggam.
        >
        >
        >
        > Here I trade oaths with the Crown of the West. I freely give my life (I
        > wanted 'loyalty' but couldn't find a form of hyldo/hold in Gothic) and
        > service for protection and rings.
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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