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Re: The Gothic word for "mother"

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  • llama_nom
    ... As Fredrik mentioned, the contact could have been between Finns and Germanic speakers in Scandinavia. The same root is recorded in Old Icelandic in eiða
    Message 1 of 18 , Aug 13, 2008
      --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "joe" <changingmoon@...> wrote:
      >
      > I would like to thank everyone who responded to my question about the
      > Gothic word for "mother". All of the replies were useful. The question
      > came from something I had read that stated that the Finnish word
      > for "mother', äiti, came from Gothic. If that is so, then when and
      > where were the Finns and Goths in contact?

      As Fredrik mentioned, the contact could have been between Finns and
      Germanic speakers in Scandinavia. The same root is recorded in Old
      Icelandic in 'eiða' (a rare synonym for 'móðir' "mother" which occurs
      occasionally in poetry) and possibly in 'edda' "great-grandmother".
    • 7d698024b6efe5cc10ab43150fa095c7
      In Bashkir language mother is esej [әсә], father - ata [ата], Khakassian language: mother - iche [iӌе], father - ada [ада]. See:
      Message 2 of 18 , Nov 21, 2016
        In Bashkir language mother is esej [әсә], father - ata [ата], Khakassian language: mother - iche [iӌе], father - ada [ада]. See: https://ru.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/%d0%9f%d1%80%d0%b8%d0%bb%d0%be%d0%b6%d0%b5%d0%bd%d0%b8%d0%b5:%d0%a1%d0%bf%d0%b8%d1%81%d0%ba%d0%b8_%d0%a1%d0%b2%d0%be%d0%b4%d0%b5%d1%88%d0%b0_%d0%b4%d0%bb%d1%8f_%d1%82%d1%8e%d1%80%d0%ba%d1%81%d0%ba%d0%b8%d1%85_%d1%8f%d0%b7%d1%8b%d0%ba%d0%be%d0%b2
        May be Gothic words for mother and father - from Hunnish language?
      • Marja Erwin
        ... Bomhard lists Old Icelandic eiða and Middle High German eide, which are probably more relevant. These terms are extremely widely distributed.
        Message 3 of 18 , Nov 21, 2016

          On 11/21/16 12:30 PM, tjaldr@... [gothic-l] wrote:

          In Bashkir language mother is esej [әсә], father - ata [ата], Khakassian language: mother - iche [iӌе], father - ada [ада]. See: https://ru.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/Приложение:Списки_Сводеша_для_тюркских_языков
          May be Gothic words for mother and father - from Hunnish language?


          Posted by: tjaldr@...
          Bomhard lists Old Icelandic eiða and Middle High German eide, which are probably more relevant. These terms are extremely widely distributed.

          http://s3.amazonaws.com/academia.edu.documents/30261056/Bomhard_-_The_Nostratic_Hypothesis_and_Nostratic_Kinship_Terminology.pdf?AWSAccessKeyId=AKIAJ56TQJRTWSMTNPEA&Expires=1479754817&Signature=UqimGKZW%2BFrukkiOU1H0Oe3S06U%3D&response-content-disposition=inline%3B%20filename%3DThe_Nostratic_Hypothesis_and_Nostratic_K.pdf
        • OSCAR HERRE
          mother is aithai.... From: tjaldr@gmail.com [gothic-l] To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, November 21, 2016 11:30 AM
          Message 4 of 18 , Nov 21, 2016
            mother is aithai....



            From: "tjaldr@... [gothic-l]" <gothic-l@yahoogroups.com>
            To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, November 21, 2016 11:30 AM
            Subject: [gothic-l] Re: The Gothic word for "mother"

             
            In Bashkir language mother is esej [әсә], father - ata [ата], Khakassian language: mother - iche [iӌе], father - ada [ада]. See: https://ru.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/Приложение:Списки_Сводеша_для_тюркских_языков
            May be Gothic words for mother and father - from Hunnish language?


          • thomasruhm
            Message 5 of 18 , Nov 22, 2016
            • thomasruhm
              I think ata is something like daddy. I haven t read all the answers yet. If that s true the word we are looking for should mean mummy.
              Message 6 of 18 , Nov 22, 2016
                I think ata is something like daddy. I haven't read all the answers yet. If that's true the word we are looking for should mean mummy.
              • OSCAR HERRE
                dad would be atta or father From: capsicum.acre@gmail.com [gothic-l] To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, November 22, 2016
                Message 7 of 18 , Nov 22, 2016
                  dad would be atta or father




                  From: "capsicum.acre@... [gothic-l]" <gothic-l@yahoogroups.com>
                  To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, November 22, 2016 11:24 AM
                  Subject: [gothic-l] Re: The Gothic word for "mother"

                   
                  I think ata is something like daddy. I haven't read all the answers yet. If that's true the word we are looking for should mean mummy.


                • amalareiks
                  I prefer the Baskhir hypothesis: Proto-Germanic: *agíɵō, *agjan- vb. Meaning: rake, harrow IE etymology: IE etymology
                  Message 8 of 18 , Nov 22, 2016
                    I prefer the Baskhir hypothesis:

                    Proto-Germanic: *agíɵō, *agjan- vb.
                    Meaning: rake, harrow
                    IE etymology: IE etymology
                    Old English: egeɵe, egɵe `a rake, harrow', ecgan, prt. egede `to harrow'
                    Old Saxon: egitha `Egge', eggian `eggen'
                    Middle Dutch: eghe; eghede
                    Dutch: eg, egge, eegde; eggen vb.
                    Middle Low German: ēgede, eyde; egen wk.
                    Old High German: egida (8.Jh.) `Ege'; eggen (10. Jh.) `eggen'
                    Middle High German: ɛgede, eide wk. f. 'egge'; ɛggen, ɛgen wk. `eggen'
                    German: Egge f. (seit 15.Jh. < Verb), eggen schw. v.

                  • amalareiks
                    From wikipedia: The hypothesis is controversial and has varying degrees of acceptance amongst linguists worldwide. In Russia
                    Message 9 of 18 , Nov 22, 2016
                      From wikipedia:
                      The hypothesis is controversial and has varying degrees of acceptance amongst linguists worldwide. In Russia, it is endorsed by a minority of linguists, such as Vladimir Dybo, but is not a generally accepted hypothesis. Allan Bomhard is a supporter, Lyle Campbell a critic. Some linguists take an agnostic view.[3] Eurasiatic, a similar but not identical grouping, was proposed by Joseph Greenberg (2000) and endorsed by Merritt Ruhlen: it is taken as a subfamily of Nostratic by Bomhard (2008).

                    • Timur Gimranov
                      Thanks, but I m not Russian, I m Bashkir, and I heard how bashkirs say :) From Russian to Bashkir: МАМА - әсәй ПАПА - атай Correct
                      Message 10 of 18 , Nov 22, 2016

                        Thanks, but I'm not Russian, I'm Bashkir, and I heard how bashkirs say :)

                        From Russian to Bashkir:
                        "МАМА - әсәй
                        ПАПА - атай"

                        Correct transcription:
                        Mother: әсәй [æsæj]
                        Father: атай [ataj]


                        23 нояб. 2016 г. 12:26 AM пользователь "las_navas@... [gothic-l]" <gothic-l@yahoogroups.com> написал:
                         

                        I prefer the Baskhir hypothesis:


                        Proto-Germanic: *agíɵō, *agjan- vb.
                        Meaning: rake, harrow
                        IE etymology: IE etymology
                        Old English: egeɵe, egɵe `a rake, harrow', ecgan, prt. egede `to harrow'
                        Old Saxon: egitha `Egge', eggian `eggen'
                        Middle Dutch: eghe; eghede
                        Dutch: eg, egge, eegde; eggen vb.
                        Middle Low German: ēgede, eyde; egen wk.
                        Old High German: egida (8.Jh.) `Ege'; eggen (10. Jh.) `eggen'
                        Middle High German: ɛgede, eide wk. f. 'egge'; ɛggen, ɛgen wk. `eggen'
                        German: Egge f. (seit 15.Jh. < Verb), eggen schw. v.

                      • amalareiks
                        My son s wife is Baskhir, I also know
                        Message 11 of 18 , Nov 22, 2016
                          My son's wife is Baskhir, I also know
                        • Marja Erwin
                          Ni kunna. What does this have to do with the origin of aiþei? The Old Icelandic and Middle High German parallels show that aiþei is a Germanic root. That
                          Message 12 of 18 , Nov 22, 2016

                            Ni kunna. What does this have to do with the origin of aiþei?

                            The Old Icelandic and Middle High German parallels show that aiþei is a Germanic root. That doesn't depend on the Nostratic hypothesis, one way or the other. There's no reason to assume an outside borrowing. There's a time problem since the Atta Unsar was probably translated early on, before any attested contact between the Goths and the Huns.

                            On 11/22/16 2:26 PM, las_navas@... [gothic-l] wrote:
                             

                            I prefer the Baskhir hypothesis:


                            Proto-Germanic: *agíɵō, *agjan- vb.
                            Meaning: rake, harrow
                            IE etymology: IE etymology
                            Old English: egeɵe, egɵe `a rake, harrow', ecgan, prt. egede `to harrow'
                            Old Saxon: egitha `Egge', eggian `eggen'
                            Middle Dutch: eghe; eghede
                            Dutch: eg, egge, eegde; eggen vb.
                            Middle Low German: ēgede, eyde; egen wk.
                            Old High German: egida (8.Jh.) `Ege'; eggen (10. Jh.) `eggen'
                            Middle High German: ɛgede, eide wk. f. 'egge'; ɛggen, ɛgen wk. `eggen'
                            German: Egge f. (seit 15.Jh. < Verb), eggen schw. v.

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