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installation floppy

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  • Idan Dolev
    Hi, I have a 6.2 redhat kernel 2.2.17-6 installed. I need to prepare an installation floppy for another machine so it would start with 2.2.17-6 kernel. How do
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 2, 2002
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      Hi,

      I have a 6.2 redhat kernel 2.2.17-6 installed.
      I need to prepare an installation floppy for another machine so it would
      start with 2.2.17-6 kernel.
      How do I do this ?

      Best regards,

      Idan Dolev
    • Idan Dolev
      I meant installation floppy. I have 6.2 system and I want to make a boot.img file with 2.2.17 kernel and not 2.2.14 ... From: Idan Dolev
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 2, 2002
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        I meant installation floppy.
        I have 6.2 system and I want to make a boot.img file with 2.2.17 kernel and
        not 2.2.14

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Idan Dolev [mailto:IDolev@...]
        Sent: Tue, April 02, 2002 11:34 AM
        To: Gnubies-Il (E-mail)
        Subject: [gnubies-il] installation floppy


        Hi,

        I have a 6.2 redhat kernel 2.2.17-6 installed.
        I need to prepare an installation floppy for another machine so it would
        start with 2.2.17-6 kernel.
        How do I do this ?

        Best regards,

        Idan Dolev



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      • Diego Iastrubni
        ... you could hack something with loadlin and a freedos disk, I installed 6.0 even from win98 using a 2.4 kernel. in the dosutils dir there is a batch file
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 2, 2002
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          On Tuesday 02 April 2002 12:17, you wrote:
          > I meant installation floppy.
          > I have 6.2 system and I want to make a boot.img file with 2.2.17 kernel and
          > not 2.2.14
          you could hack something with loadlin and a freedos disk, I installed 6.0
          even from win98 using a 2.4 kernel. in the dosutils dir there is a batch
          file (autoboot.bat), read it and hack something out from it. it is not
          difficult.

          - diego


          --
          Well, some take delight in the carriages a-rolling,
          And some take delight in the hurling and the bowling,
          But I take delight in the juice of the barley,
          And courting pretty fair maids in the morning bright and early.
        • David Bergman
          ... Maybe this text will help you: Booting From Floppy One of the great attractions to Linux is the small size of the kernel, the core code necessary to run
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 2, 2002
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            Diego Iastrubni wrote:

            >On Tuesday 02 April 2002 12:17, you wrote:
            >
            >>I meant installation floppy.
            >>I have 6.2 system and I want to make a boot.img file with 2.2.17 kernel and
            >>not 2.2.14
            >>

            Maybe this text will help you:
            Booting From Floppy

            One of the great attractions to Linux is the small size of the kernel,
            the core code necessary to run the operating system. On most systems,
            even in a default install configuration, the kernel is less than 1.44 MB
            - small enough to copy to a floppy. The ability to copy this core code
            to a floppy means that, even in many catastrophic failure scenarios,
            you'll always have the ability to get to your Linux system. If your BIOS
            is set up to allow booting from a floppy, you'll be able to do so with
            Linux.

            This boot floppy also differs greatly from a Windows rescue disk. On the
            Windows side, the rescue disk merely provides a set of tools that allow
            you to access the operating system from a hard drive or CD-ROM. The
            Windows kernel does not, in fact, reside on the floppy. In Linux, every
            piece of code necessary to run the basic OS can be copied to a boot floppy.

            A Linux boot floppy is, in my book, one of four or five essential backup
            tools. Even though my boot loader of choice has always been Lilo, I keep
            a boot floppy for my Linux OS in its own special place in my work area,
            where it's immediately accessible in a pinch.

            If you've recompiled the kernel or lost the original boot floppy created
            during install, it's a good idea to create another. Creating another
            floppy after a kernel recompile is necessary in order to use the new
            kernel from floppy.

            This is a relatively painless process in Linux. First, use a brand new
            formatted floppy. As this floppy can be in DOS format with no ill
            effects, you should be able to use a new disk straight out of the box.
            Next, check the path you've assigned your existing kernel in Lilo:

            view /etc/lilo

            You're looking for the "image" line in Lilo. It should look something
            like this:

            image = /boot/vmlinuz

            Now, with the floppy in the drive, issue the following command:

            dd if=/boot/vmlinuz of=/dev/fd0 bs=8192

            This command instructs your Linux system to copy [dd] the input file
            [if] /boot/vmlinuz to the output file [of] /dev/fd0 [the first floppy
            device] using a block size [bs] of 8192 bytes. Provided your BIOS is set
            up to boot from floppy, you should be able to test this new boot floppy
            by leaving the floppy in the drive and rebooting.

            By keeping a current boot floppy close by, you'll always have access to
            your Linux system.
            (*Tony Steidler-Dennison)

            ---
            David Bergman
          • Diego Iastrubni
            ... and how do you control which device will be mounted on /? how do you pass kernel parameters to this kernel? - diego -- Nothing shortens a journey so
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 3, 2002
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              On Wednesday 03 April 2002 03:06, David Bergman wrote:
              > dd if=/boot/vmlinuz of=/dev/fd0 bs=8192
              >
              > This command instructs your Linux system to copy [dd] the input file
              > [if] /boot/vmlinuz to the output file [of] /dev/fd0 [the first floppy
              > device] using a block size [bs] of 8192 bytes. Provided your BIOS is set
              > up to boot from floppy, you should be able to test this new boot floppy
              > by leaving the floppy in the drive and rebooting.
              and how do you control which device will be mounted on /?
              how do you pass kernel parameters to this kernel?

              - diego
              --
              Nothing shortens a journey so pleasantly as an account of misfortunes at
              which the hearer is permitted to laugh.
              -- Quentin Crisp
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