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Re: quantum questions

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  • Gerry
    ... And you wanted ME TO READ THAT BOOK!!! Thanks, Mike, but I have enough difficulty sleeping. LOL ... Even while I was writing last night about the
    Message 1 of 97 , Oct 23, 2003
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      --- In gnosticism2@yahoogroups.com, Mike Leavitt <ac998@l...> wrote:
      >
      > Actually I can see your point, but that book haunts me to this day.
      >


      And you wanted ME TO READ THAT BOOK!!! Thanks, Mike, but I have
      enough difficulty sleeping. LOL


      >
      > Haven't even heard of him until now, but Pierre Telard de Jiardin
      > (sp?), a Jesuit, tried to correlate evolution to Catholicism, as he
      > was a Paleontologist. His own order tried to ban his books as
      > heretical, oddly, Pope John the 23rd interceded on his behalf, and
      > pronounced them not heretical. They should like Catholicized
      > Theosophy, at least they did back when I read them, though the Pope
      > was really right, because he always stayed just within Orthodoxy,
      > even though he had the whole Universe evolving.
      >


      Even while I was writing last night about the pitfalls of one
      discipline being dependent on another, or more typically, speaking
      outside of its scope against the accepted truths of another, I began
      to wonder how the Church has even withstood the test of time.
      Considering our friend Copernicus whom we mentioned the other day,
      and especially Galileo, it looks like people by now might have
      said, "Yeah, whateverÂ…" with regards to proclamations that fly in the
      face of reason.

      As you point out, though, even scientific findings change over time.
      Realistically, I guess the best approach for each perspective would
      be to allow some wiggle room for growth rather than relying on years
      of "accepted" truths to determine the immutability of any "apparent"
      truths, virtually excluding reasonable explorations into new
      frontiers.

      Geez, I'm not really a Trekkie; I just sound like one on the
      Internet. ;-)

      Gerry
    • Terje Bergersen
      ... As far as I can see, Walter Bauer is considered somewhat of a pioneer in the investigative genre of Early Christian scholarship - especially with the
      Message 97 of 97 , Nov 17, 2003
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        > Interesting to hear it put that way - I haven't read Bauer (yet), so
        > Gnostic Gospels felt like an historian exploring new ground. Based
        > on her bibliography and notes, I at least had a sense that Pagels was
        > leaning on Bauer.

        As far as I can see, Walter Bauer is considered somewhat of a pioneer
        in the investigative genre of "Early Christian" scholarship - especially
        with the Comittee to which Pagels belonged (the Coptic Gnostic Library
        Comittee of scholars).


        Anyways, I was just butting in to inform the readers of this list
        that they can make their own mind up, without much trouble and without
        parting with money - Bauer`s chief work is online


        Walter Bauer: Orthodoxy and Heresy in Earliest Christianity

        http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/~humm/Resources/Bauer/




        Pax Pleromae

        --
        Terje Dahl Bergersen
        Deacon,Ecclesia Gnostica Norvegia
        terje@...
        http://terje.bergersen.net/
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