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Re: Back to the subject at hand

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  • pmcvflag
    Well all, I am finally back. In looking through the posts there doesn t seem to be much for me to jump in on (though I admittedly skimmed very quickly, due to
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 21, 2003
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      Well all, I am finally back. In looking through the posts there
      doesn't seem to be much for me to jump in on (though I admittedly
      skimmed very quickly, due to the amount of posts since I had left),
      so I thought I would go back and answer this one post that was
      specifically directed at me. I don't mean to bring up the Pythagoras
      issue again, but I thought perhaps this could reiterate the question
      of exactly what "Gnosticism" is.

      So, George asks....

      >>>>You write:
      "Gnosticism is most definately syncratic."

      But so far, the only way we've been able to identify
      the strands of this syncratism is by starting with
      Pythagoras.<<<

      Actually, we have not established any connection between Pythagoras
      and the Gnostics. Thus, I am not sure what you mean to imply by
      saying that Pythagoras is the only way we have identified strands of
      syncratism in Gnosticism. I have however pointed out aspects of that
      Platonic system called "Neopythagorianims", perhaps that is what you
      meant.

      >>>While I'm willing to agree that the Pythagorean School was
      not gnostic, it would be most helpful to learn which factor
      or factors EXCLUDE it from Gnosticism.

      Can you provide a summary of the distinctions?<<<

      Well, more to the point would be; what reason do we have to include
      it? However, perhaps I can satisfy the question concerning
      destinctions.

      First of all, "Gnosticism" belongs to a specific segment of time
      known as the "Late Antiquities" Pythagoras does not, and therefor
      does not fit that part of the word "Gnosticism".

      Next point, since Gnosticism is a syncratism between Greek and Jewish
      thought, the lack of Jewish influence on Pythagoras excludes him.

      Also, I have seen no evidence that Pythagoras believed in a
      cosmogeny, cosmology, anthropogenty, etc., that in any way coincided
      with the ones we see in "Gnosticism".

      These things would need to be established before we could think of
      connecting the two belief systems in any way.

      PMCV
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