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Re: Resonating scripture

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  • lady_caritas
    ... discovering Gnostic thought that brought me to the realization that I had come home: The Gospel of Thomas-to be specific, #17 was among ... has heard,
    Message 1 of 45 , Jan 4, 2003
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      --- In gnosticism2@yahoogroups.com, "Gerry" <gerryhsp@y...> wrote:
      > I can at least say with certainty, however, what it was upon first
      discovering Gnostic thought that brought me to the realization that I
      had come home: The Gospel of Thomas-to be specific, #17 was among
      the sayings that impressed me the most:
      >
      > Jesus said, "I shall give you what no eye has seen, what no ear
      has heard, what no hand has touched, what has not arisen in the human
      heart."
      >
      > Odd that such a verse should have moved me more than others,
      especially since it has parallels in the Old and New Testaments
      (Isaiah 64:4; I Corinthians 2:9), and surely elsewhere. It's not as
      if I hadn't encountered something like it before. Considering that
      passage in context, I might attribute its impact on me to the
      cumulative effect of having perused all the logia of the GTh. Elaine
      Pagels also points out in The Gnostic Paul that such a phrase would
      probably have been uttered to an initiate being welcomed into the
      Gnostic fold, so perhaps it was simply appropriate that its
      significance has remained with me since that first reading.
      >
      > Gerry


      This is such a powerful saying, Gerry. The words indeed indicate
      that which can only be reached through an
      extraordinary "acquaintance".

      You wrote about "fascination with the Word, whether written or
      vocalized." A variation of this same passage also inspired me deeply
      even before I ever read _The Gospel of Thomas_. Years ago I sang for
      the first time an aria, "Eye hath not seen," from A. R. Gaul's
      oratorio, _The Holy City_, most likely based on the verses from
      Isaiah and 1 Corinthians you mentioned.

      "Eye hath not seen, ear hath not heard, neither have enter'd into the
      heart of man the things which God, which God hath prepar'd for them
      that love Him, for them that love Him ..."

      It didn't matter that I was singing in an orthodox Christian church
      to an orthodox congregation. I still felt that "connectedness" you
      describe. Very moving...

      Cari
    • pmcvflag
      ... Others would argue that the movement INTO Latin as the scholar s lingua franca was the greatest mistake of western culture... this would include the
      Message 45 of 45 , Jan 9, 2003
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        > Because moving away from Latin as the scholars' lingua franca
        > was the greatest error throughout the history of European culture.
        > This has already been noted by A. Schopenhauer.

        Others would argue that the movement INTO Latin as the
        scholar's "lingua franca" was the greatest mistake of western
        culture... this would include the Greek-speaking composers of much of
        the Nag Hammadi library, as well as it's Coptic speaking translators.
        Often times both of these languages were very specifically used as
        outposts of resistance against Latin cultural oppression. In northern
        Egypt the Greek speaking community was second only to the Jews for
        their reputation for insurrection (in Alexandria the Greek community
        lived just to the south of the walled Jewish quarter, and the
        cultural exchange equalled the resentment of occupation. This is the
        venue in which Gnosticism was created).


        None of these books we are talking about were written in Latin, so
        gumming up the works with yet a fourth (unrelated) language in the
        mix seemed rather strange is all. Don't get me wrong, Latin is a
        wonderful language, and one that is very useful to the scientific
        community. It is also something like speaking Hebrew at a Palistinian
        knitting club. I have no problem if you want to use latin... knock
        yourself out our uptight friend. Now, if we were talking about
        Catholicism it would seem perfectly obvious that you should use Latin.

        By the way..... Schopenhauer wasn't Gnostic either.

        PMCV
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