Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Anthony de Mello fans?

Expand Messages
  • wherecar54
    Thanks for the links Gerry! I will look into this man. I love an independent thinker.:o) Sadly, every time I think that the Church is taking steps forward. I
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 20, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Thanks for the links Gerry! I will look into this man. I love an
      independent thinker.:o)

      Sadly, every time I think that the Church is taking steps forward. I
      am disappointed to see that it is falling back into the same rut.

      A couple of years ago, I was given hope when the Pope apologized for
      the Church's sins. Almost immediately after, he torpedoed
      reconciliatory meetings with Rabbis, by stating that only the
      Catholic Church contained the "fullness of truth". *sigh*

      Dan


      --- In gnosticism2@y..., gerryhsp <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > Has anyone else read any of the works of Anthony de Mello? Until
      > noticing a recommendation at another site, I don't believe I had
      ever
      > encountered his name before.
      >
      > Descriptions of his book, One Minute Wisdom, originally caught my
      > eye. Written in the format of anecdotes between Master and
      Disciple,
      > the stories bridge Eastern tradition, from de Mello's life in
      India,
      > with that of his Western Jesuit order. As he writes of the
      stories'
      > protagonist, "He is a Hindu Guru, a Zen Roshi, a Taoist Sage, a
      > Jewish Rabbi, a Christian Monk, a Sufi Mystic. He is Lao-tzu and
      > Socrates. Buddha and Jesus. Zarathustra and Mohammed. His teaching
      is
      > found in the seventh century B.C. and the twentieth century A.D.
      His
      > wisdom belongs to East and West alike."
      >
      > Elsewhere in the introduction, de Mello adds:
      >
      > "This, alas, is not an easy book! It was written not to instruct
      but
      > to Awaken. Concealed within its pages (not in the printed words,
      not
      > even in the tales, but in its spirit, its mood, its atmosphere) is
      a
      > Wisdom which cannot be conveyed in human speech. As you read the
      > printed page and struggle with the Master's cryptic language, it is
      > possible that you will unwittingly chance upon the Silent Teaching
      > that lurks within the book, and be Awakened and transformed. This
      is
      > what Wisdom means: To be changed without the slightest effort on
      your
      > part, to be transformed, believe it or not, merely by waking to the
      > reality that is not words, that lies beyond the reach of words."
      >
      > (http://home.global.co.za/~peterbi/source.htm)
      >
      >
      > We certainly start to notice some familiar themes there, and one
      can
      > find even more when perusing the charges leveled posthumously
      against
      > Fr. de Mello in a 1998 Vatican censure. The National Catholic
      > Reporter summarized the defects of his work as follows:
      >
      > ·Asserting an impersonal God, as opposed to "the revelation which
      has
      > come in the person of Jesus Christ;"
      >
      > ·Denying that the Bible contains valid statements about God, and
      > claiming that sacred religious texts "can cause people to become
      > obtuse and cruel;"
      >
      > ·Denying that Jesus is the Son of God;
      >
      > ·Declaring that the question of life after death is "irrelevant;"
      >
      > ·Advocating moral relativism, in the form of saying that "since
      evil
      > is simply ignorance, there are no objective rules of morality;"
      >
      > ·Criticizing the church for "making the word of God in holy
      scripture
      > into an idol," and hence "banishing God from the temple."
      >
      > (http://www.natcath.com/NCR_Online/archives/082898/082898f.htm)
      >
      >
      > In the third paragraph of this pontifical document (one can access
      > its entirety via the link listed below), the following criticisms
      > against de Mello's works deserve special attention:
      >
      > "At one point, he speaks of a "dissolving" into the impersonal God,
      > as salt dissolves in water. On various occasions, the question of
      > destiny after death is declared to be irrelevant; only the present
      > life should be of interest. With respect to this life, since evil
      is
      > simply ignorance, there are no objective rules of morality. Good
      and
      > evil are simply mental evaluations imposed upon reality."
      >
      > (http://www.cesnur.org/testi/demello.htm)
      >
      >
      > While I never exactly formulated an opinion regarding the gnostic
      > tendencies of Samuel Clemens, other than my admonition that one
      > should not make the mistake of stopping short in digging to uncover
      > the Truth (not saying he did or did not), it seems that the late
      > Father de Mello might have felt quite at home with this bunch
      > assembled here.
      >
      > Gerry
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.