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Making history making us

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  • hey_market
    For dualists, history is a double-edged sword, just like everything else. As Ernst notes, the old adage holds true that those ignorant of history are
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 21, 2002
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      For dualists, history is a double-edged sword,
      just like everything else. <br><br>As Ernst notes, the
      old adage holds true that those ignorant of history
      are doomed to repeat it (more than a few ethnic
      purges come to mind). And yet, we might equally contend
      that those ever-conscious of history are likewise
      doomed to repeat it (hmmm, I guess the same ethnic
      purges come to mind.). <br><br>In either case, it
      depends upon how we're either ignoring or attending to
      history, and most importantly, what will be realized in
      doing either. And this is wholly contingent upon where
      we place our ultimate value. <br><br>So, will we
      attach value to a given thing, even if that thing is an
      historical event, idea, or sentiment? If so, we will likely
      reap the normal course of rewards and punishments. And
      while we may not be able to predict the specific
      rewards or punishments begotten by this attachment, we
      can predict that in the big picture, it will be a
      mixture of good and evil.<br><br>Or so the dualists see
      it. <br><br>And Gnostics are dualists. As such, the
      aonic challenge then for Gnostics isn't so much to see
      only history but rather through and beyond history,
      neither to contain or be contained by it. To be what it
      is not, this is certainly one way to all at once
      frame and unframe it, and this may or may not include
      knowing what it is.<br><br>But there's something more
      important to know about, or more precisely, to do, since
      gnosis, in typical dualistic fashion, is both a verb and
      a noun, in that it moves and simultaneously it is
      rest. But, that's just how we split things
      up.<br><br>That's how it occurs to us. Here. But then there's here
      and there.<br><br>Not so concidentally, knowing that
      we split things up is probably the most important
      history lesson. In fact, all of history and its contents
      are mind-splitting, including all of the disciplines
      that it contains, from science to
      psychology.<br><br>of course, and eventually in due course, it's time
      to split for home.
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