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Re: [Gnosticism2] Gnosticism, Masonry,

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  • Jim osburn
    I agree with you Terrie on these points,   It is a social organization and sort of fills that role for me. In this neck of the woods most social and religious
    Message 1 of 19 , Oct 28, 2009
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      I agree with you Terrie on these points,
       
      It is a social organization and sort of fills that role for me. In this neck of the woods most social and religious groups are male dominate.
       
      I all so don't like how the male part of the order try to run the subordinate orders, because my personal view is that at best men are equal to women, perhaps even not that, does any one hear "Goddess worship" :) I lean that way a lot.
       
      I do not consider masonry as a religion, certainly not mine, and I don't think most masons do either.
       
      Please understand I am not trying to defend masonry, just making personal observations with my experiences, also as I mentioned I am only 3rd degree so there is much in the higher degrees I know nothing about. I have read a lot about the history or mythology of masonry's origins and am very interested in the esoteric side. As is well known the "public image" is really down played or white washed and I suspect there is a lot more to it, I just haven't decided yet to invest  the time and money to pursue the higher degrees.
       
      Jim
    • esapress@ymail.com
      Tell you what, socially, I sure do agree. For example, the last time I was stuck in a one horse town in the middle of no-where I found something really fun to
      Message 2 of 19 , Oct 29, 2009
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        Tell you what, socially, I sure do agree.

        For example, the last time I was stuck in a one horse town in the middle of no-where I found something really fun to do, namely, I spent my time teaching a mason mathematics, math and astro, really, all kinds of research that I do. It was fun and I think for him, he was so happy to see something new at his age, it was like a breath of fresh air all around.

        He was a Master Mason, a retired surgeon, an art collector with a particular interest in the field of symbolism which was something we quite had in common; man, we had such fun discussing. He'd always say that I had taught him mathematics and that I was his 2nd great teacher which was quite a compliment (especially so considering who his first teacher was) and still is.

        Ultimately, we wrote a little novel of sorts the year I spent there a/b sensibly I squashed it because I don't prefer it and in greater parts it was/is my decision and property. It was just something he wanted me/us to do (like an exercise, perhaps) and I agreed; besides it was a fun way to spend the time while I was in town and it did in fact help sharpen my/his skills (in part his intent I'd guess) even though, ultimately, I still don't/won't have an appreciation or interest in publishing fiction.

        I found out recently that he passed away; probably why this comes up a/o is on my mind of late, I would've liked to have visited a bit more; I was really fond of him.

        Terrie


        --- In gnosticism2@yahoogroups.com, Jim osburn <garamanus48@...> wrote:
        >
        > I agree with you Terrie on these points,
        >  
        > It is a social organization and sort of fills that role for me. In this neck of the woods most social and religious groups are male dominate.
        >  
        > I all so don't like how the male part of the order try to run the subordinate orders, because my personal view is that at best men are equal to women, perhaps even not that, does any one hear "Goddess worship" :) I lean that way a lot.
        >  
        > I do not consider masonry as a religion, certainly not mine, and I don't think most masons do either.
        >  
        > Please understand I am not trying to defend masonry, just making personal observations with my experiences, also as I mentioned I am only 3rd degree so there is much in the higher degrees I know nothing about. I have read a lot about the history or mythology of masonry's origins and am very interested in the esoteric side. As is well known the "public image" is really down played or white washed and I suspect there is a lot more to it, I just haven't decided yet to invest  the time and money to pursue the higher degrees.
        >  
        > Jim
        >
      • esapress@ymail.com
        Speaking of traveling, thinking about my fried Rex - I have been trying to find out what happened, how his cancer research went, how his last days were,
        Message 3 of 19 , Oct 29, 2009
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          Speaking of traveling, thinking about my fried Rex - I have been trying to find out what happened, how his cancer research went, how his last days were, whether he was happy, at peace, whether his last requests were honored in full, if the Masons held a ceremony for him, so on, but thus far the gal/guy who was looking after him is still (as she says) too busy traveling.

          Terrie

          --- In gnosticism2@yahoogroups.com, william unowho <jake0840@...> wrote:
          >
          > actually Terrie
          > Im being clandestine in my comments. Ive been known to travel in the past. didnt go as far though in my travels. Also as I grow in gnosis I do see a lot of allusions to masonic values..from the vantage point where I could see in my limitied view.
          >
          > William
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: "esapress@..." <esapress@...>
          > To: gnosticism2@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Wed, October 28, 2009 11:44:38 AM
          > Subject: [Gnosticism2] Re: New to the group
          >
          >  
          > I think that's very good suggestion PMCV and William, thanks. As you can tell, this whole issue surprised me, it's very curious.
          >
          > Terrie
          >
          > --- In gnosticism2@ yahoogroups. com, william unowho <jake0840@ .> wrote:
          > >
          > > Terrie
          > >
          > > I would agree with an earlier commenter. while many in this group have some knowledge of gnosis , not many are masons..that may limit thier input. Why dont you do a comparison of where they seem to intersect in your opinion and then allow us to add value.
          > > I think tht as per my research gnostics did indeed believe in a higher being and they should have no issue with masonry based on that metric. but again I think you can add better food to this discussion if you  point out some like or seemingly unlike issues
          > >
          > > William
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > ____________ _________ _________ __
          > > From: pmcvflag <no_reply@yahoogroup s.com>
          > > To: gnosticism2@ yahoogroups. com
          > > Sent: Tue, October 27, 2009 10:05:14 PM
          > > Subject: [Gnosticism2] Re: New to the group
          > >
          > >  
          > > Hey Terrie
          > >
          > > My thought is that we should talk about and compare these issues before we really say whether there is a contrast or friction between Freemasons and Gnosticism, or some connection. I should say at the start that depending on what comes up I reserve the right to argue both sides.
          > >
          > > --- In gnosticism2@ yahoogroups. com, "esapress@ ." <esapress@ .> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Hi Greg, PMCV,
          > > >
          > > > I come from a long line of Masons, and was, myself, a Job's Daughter when I was a child. I've known several 33rd degree Masons in my lifetime and what a pleasure it always is to chat with such folk; truly some of my favorite conversations (even if, dang, they're always men.)
          > > >
          > > > I am/was unaware of any sort of essential friction between Gnosticism and Masonry, so, I am certainly finding this conversation interesting.
          > > >
          > > > Greg, you seem to be indicating that these differences aren't personal a/o drama rather that they are basic differences abiding between principal and concept. Am I reading you correctly?
          > > >
          > > > At any rate, please do go on, I'm finding this conversation quite interesting. Also, I too am having a look at some of Pike's writings because, actually, as fate would have it his name's been coming up a lot of late, so, there's good timing there I think.
          > > >
          > > > Terrie
          > > >
          > >
          >
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