Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

The Origins of Gnosticism this week on CCG!!!

Expand Messages
  • miguelconner
    Perhaps the most debated and intriguing topic in Gnosticism is where it began. Was it a Christian side effect? Did it originate from Persian or other pagan
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 22, 2007
      Perhaps the most debated and intriguing topic in Gnosticism is where
      it began. Was it a Christian side effect? Did it originate from
      Persian or other pagan mysteries? Was it just another Jewish heresy?
      We probe deep into history and theology to find out where exactly the
      Gnostics sprouted out of in mankind's imagination. Astral
      Guest—Birger A. Pearson, author of `Ancient Gnosticism: Traditions and
      Literature', `Gnosticism, Judaism and Egyptian Christianity' and one
      of the original translators of the Nag Hammadi Library (and also the
      new one by Marvin Meyer).

      Topics Discussed:

      --Yet more evidence that Gnosticism not only predates Christianity but
      is more than likely the first Christianity.
      --Understanding that the root of all Gnostic philosophy is what is
      called Classic or Sethian Gnosticism.
      --How and why the writings of Plato are the bedrock of all Gnostic
      thought.
      --The real possibility that the early Gnostics believed that only a
      small percentage of humans had the Divine Spark (soul).
      --How Gnosticism peaked when Valentinus reconciled Gnostic theology
      with the theology of the Catholic Church.
      --Trying to quell the tide of many scholars not only trying to
      redefine Gnosticism but erase the term all together.
      --Birger's story on how he became involved with James Robinson and the
      Nag Hammadi Project, including his struggles and victories in
      translating the ancient Coptic manuscripts.
      --Touching on one of the first and last remaining Gnostics of
      history—The Mandeans.

      And much more! It's very hard to speak to someone closer to the
      Gnostic ground zero than Birger.

      As always to access the program:

      --Go to my homepage http://www.thegodabovegod.com/
      --Scroll down until you see the Stickam screen (the eye with the
      bloody tear)
      --Click the music icon and voila…'Coffee, Cigarettes & Gnosis
      67—Origins of Gnosticism' will appear in its entirety!

      Our rebroadcast this week is `Coffee, Cigarettes & Gnosis #16—In the
      Name of the Rose Cross'. Our guest was Tobias Churton, filmmaker,
      lecturer, member of several esoteric organizations, and author of
      'Gnostic Philosophy'& 'The Golden Builders: Alchemists, Rosicrucian, &
      The First Freemasons'.

      We continue to explore the cultural effect of Gnosticism on Western
      Culture. This we take a broad yet thorough sweep of the late Medieval
      Ages all the way to the birth of Rock'n'roll. So fasten your sanity
      chastity belts because this is might make you pregnant with gnosis if
      you're not careful.


      Topics discussed:

      --A revisit of the Troubadours, Cathars, Manicheans, and Bogomils.
      --We study the origins of the phenomena of Romantic Love. You might
      shocked at how it began and maybe save yourself a lot of money and
      heartache.
      --The truth behind the secret fraternity of the Rosicrucians (The Rose
      Cross).
      --Several elements of Medieval and Early Enlightenment Alchemists and
      Magicians.
      --The gnosis and Gnostic roots of Aleister Crowley.
      --The reality that the English music invasion, including Pink Floyd
      and John Lennon, was influenced by Gnostic Christianity.

      And much more!

      This show demonstrates the responsibility the elite, the educated, &
      the fortunate have to burden. The revolution won't happen on the
      streets or in the voting booths, my Truthseekers, but in the realms of
      ideas and imagination.

      Abraxas
    • lady_caritas
      ... and ... Hello, Miguel. I finally had a chance to listen to your interview with Dr. Birger Pearson. Thank you for that. I ll have to check on his new
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 27, 2007


        --- In gnosticism2@yahoogroups.com, "miguelconner" <miguelconner@...> wrote:
        >
        > Perhaps the most debated and intriguing topic in Gnosticism is where
        > it began. Was it a Christian side effect? Did it originate from
        > Persian or other pagan mysteries? Was it just another Jewish heresy?
        > We probe deep into history and theology to find out where exactly the
        > Gnostics sprouted out of in mankind's imagination. Astral
        > Guest—Birger A. Pearson, author of `Ancient Gnosticism: Traditions and
        > Literature', `Gnosticism, Judaism and Egyptian Christianity' and one
        > of the original translators of the Nag Hammadi Library (and also the
        > new one by Marvin Meyer).

        Hello, Miguel.  I finally had a chance to listen to your interview with Dr. Birger Pearson.  Thank you for that.  I'll have to check on his new book, Ancient Gnosticism: Traditions and Literature. 

         

        It seems that discussions around here in the past have centered on the term Gnosticism involving a stricter historical treatment vs. a broader, modern usage.  Now, we see newer books questioning the very category of historical "Gnosticism" itself.  Not only considered would be possible origins, but also did it ever exist or should we redefine attributes of such a category, etc.?

         

        Birger Pearson and others entertain a viable category called Gnosticism, which defines Gnosis as salvific, predating Christianity with some later Christianizing of "Sethian" or "Classic" texts, and notably with Valentinus later incorporating a Christian theme.  IOW, this category would encompass more than a burgeoning Christian milieu.

         

        It's good to have another introductory book that offers a view of a category encompassing more than primarily a Christian phenomenon for readers' ongoing debates.

         

        Cari

         

      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.