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Re: Critical Reading

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  • marinas_snake
    ... in Old ... The Gospel of Philip wasn t written in modern english either. If I were translating ancient text to english wouldn t it follow that I should
    Message 1 of 137 , Mar 6, 2006
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      --- In gnosticism2@yahoogroups.com, "Gerry" <gerryhsp@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In gnosticism2@yahoogroups.com, Mike Leavitt <ac998@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hello marinas_snake
      > >
      > > > Sorry, I will have to finish this later. But maybe "partner" is
      > > > referring to being an "heir".
      > > >
      > > > Marina
      > >
      > > That would be quite siginifigant in the case of the Magdaline.
      > >
      > > Regards
      > > --
      > > Mike Leavitt
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > It might also be significant if the Gospel of Philip were written
      in Old
      > French. Just for the record though, it was not.
      >
      > Gerry
      >

      The Gospel of Philip wasn't written in modern english either. If I
      were translating ancient text to english wouldn't it follow that I
      should know the root of the english word(s)I am using to express the
      closest meaning of the ancient text? Afterall, english itself is a
      mixed bag of languages isn't it?

      Marina
    • Gerry
      ... Thank you, Jana, for noticing them. ... And ya know, that was the one suggestion you wrote me that I was the most hesitant to attempt. There s something
      Message 137 of 137 , Apr 8, 2006
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        --- In gnosticism2@yahoogroups.com, "janahooks" <janahooks@...> wrote:

        >
        > [. . .]
        >
        > Gerry and Lady C.,thanks for all of the info and links.…

         

        Thank you, Jana, for noticing them. 

         


        > Gerry, after looking at the National Geographic link, I was

        > reminded of some suggestions I gave you on faded writing. I'm feeling
        > really good about watery sepia ink and sandpaper...and sand
        > horizontally and vertically...with the gray sandpaper...
        >

         

        And ya know, that was the one suggestion you wrote me that I was the most hesitant to attempt.  There's something about the dual-layered papyrus and its almost glossy sheen that made me wonder if such coarse measures would destroy the whole thing, but the more I've thought about it (along with your renewed convictions), the more I believe it would indeed yield a desirable finish.  I imagine the weathered results would be akin to repeatedly wadding up a sheet of paper to the point that it becomes more like a thin piece of cloth rather than a crisp piece of paper.  Only this way, you avoid the wrinkles!

        Gerry

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