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Limited reading, have questions

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  • flowjack11
    Hello, all, I have been reading the online recources lately that define and discuss religious Gnosticism. Namely, I have read through much of Gnosis.org and
    Message 1 of 82 , Oct 7, 2005
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      Hello, all,

      I have been reading the online recources lately that define and
      discuss religious Gnosticism. Namely, I have read through much
      of "Gnosis.org" and a few other sites. As such, I wouldn't call
      myself a particularly well-read persron with regards to Gnostic Lit.

      Still, I think that I have a fairly decent idea of what Gnosticism
      means today. As such, there are a few questions I would like to ask.

      Before asking them, however, I would like to clarify a few things
      that define the nature and purpose of my inquiry: a) I am not a
      Christian seeking to declaim against Gnosticism, call it heresy or
      any suchlike; b) I am not particularly religous at this moment, nor
      am I, as the saying is, "spiritual"; I believe in God but do not
      claim to have any knowledge about him/her/it. For all I know, God
      either hates us, loves us, a combination of the two, or else he is
      completely indifferent to us; c) I am basically a fascinated
      observer, intrigued by Gnosticism, perhaps considering a conversion,
      yet remaining skeptical, as I am with religions of any kind.

      1) Is the "Unknown Father God" considered to be Absolutely Perfect?
      If so, what is the standard definition of "perfection" for
      Gnosticism? Is the "Unknown Father God" at all like Descartes idea
      of God as an "Ontological God", meaning the most perfect being
      possible?

      2) Which is more perfect: A) A fruit seed which never whithers,
      decays, or becomes unwholesome in any way, regardless of age, or B)
      a fruit seed which decays after a few months and becomes infertile?

      Those two questions will do for now. I'll wait and see what happens
      with them, if anything, and then consider asking other questions.

      Thanks,

      Chuck
    • pmcvflag
      Hey David ... need to ask ya first. Did Early Gnostics really think and speak in allegorical terms? Cause if so that may answer a lot but only open more
      Message 82 of 82 , Oct 27, 2005
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        Hey David

        >>>wow, your questions really sparked some thought in my head, I
        need to ask ya first. Did Early "Gnostics" really think and speak in
        allegorical terms? Cause if so that may answer a lot but only open
        more questions to debate. very good questions at that.<<<

        Thanks, glad you liked the questions :) As Lady Cari states, there
        is evidence in the original Gnostic writings for allegorical
        hermeneutic. Part of the point I was trying to bring up was exactly
        where this should be applied. In other words... Philip, the
        Tripartite Tractate, and other texts state directly that there is
        allegory (so there is no question on that front), but exactly where
        and how it is applied is very open to discussion.

        In this particular case, I was asking if you think that that
        allegory extends to the notion of the Demiurge or not. Let me also
        point out that the idea that something may literally be true does
        not exclude the notion that it may have also been allegorical in
        meaning. So.... where do you think this all fit in the original
        intent of the Gnostic texts?

        PMCV
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