Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Gnostic Sources on the Boob Tube?

Expand Messages
  • Gerry
    Here s something peculiar that came up when I was researching a Gnostic topic a while back. I was kind of shocked by what turned up, enough so to waste an
    Message 1 of 2 , May 1, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Here's something peculiar that came up when I was researching a
      Gnostic topic a while back. I was kind of shocked by what turned up,
      enough so to waste an evening trying to investigate it further. Mind
      you, I've never watched _Gilmore Girls_, although I think highly of
      Lauren Graham (and she's a helluva Poker player!). At any rate, my
      initial search had yielded a 4th-season episode of this series that
      was titled "Nag Hammadi Is Where They Found the Gnostic Gospels."

      Hmmm. Had mention of our traditional Gnostic texts made its way into
      a sitcom? Or was this simply another instance, like Prada's new
      perfume, of Gnostic references gratuitously making their way into
      popular culture . . . completely devoid of their original context? I
      was curious, but the various sites with episode synopses that I had
      visited revealed no insights. I tried to look for possible "Gnostic"
      connections with both the director and the scriptwriter. I finally
      had to read through a transcript of the dialogue to discover the
      reference [using your browser's FIND feature there, type "speaker"
      and go directly to the section in question]:

      http://koti.mbnet.fi/gilmoreg/Jaksot/kasikirjoitukset/k4.13.htm

      Rather disappointing, innit. The whole thing was material for a
      joke, and I reckon it shouldn't surprise us that when it comes to
      such seemingly "obscure" texts, most people simply "don't get it."

      Anyhow, whenever I look at other people's evaluations on the Web of
      such direct allusions in modern media to traditional sources, I
      notice a very varied sampling of opinions. I guess the view that I
      find most difficult to reconcile is that even though there is often
      no apparent recognition of the actual significance of the material by
      the parties appropriating it (and certainly NO effort made to educate
      the targeted consumer), some Gnostic sympathizers appear to be just
      fine with it anyway. I'm wondering if anyone can help me understand
      how "mainstreaming" Gnosticism in such a way would be at all
      beneficial . . . or desirable? Can we actually count a virtually
      subliminal citation of Gnostic texts, especially when done in such
      flippant fashion, as increasing the awareness of Gnosticism in the
      public eye?

      The analogy of pearls and swine comes to mind, but I'm wondering if
      others see it differently.

      Gerry
    • Mike Leavitt
      Hello Gerry ... I think you see it right. Me sees pigs poking in amongst the pearls. Regards -- Mike Leavitt ac998@lafn.org
      Message 2 of 2 , May 1, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello Gerry

        On 05/01/05, you wrote:

        >
        > Here's something peculiar that came up when I was researching a
        > Gnostic topic a while back. I was kind of shocked by what turned up,
        > enough so to waste an evening trying to investigate it further. Mind
        > you, I've never watched _Gilmore Girls_, although I think highly of
        > Lauren Graham (and she's a helluva Poker player!). At any rate, my
        > initial search had yielded a 4th-season episode of this series that
        > was titled "Nag Hammadi Is Where They Found the Gnostic Gospels."
        >
        > Hmmm. Had mention of our traditional Gnostic texts made its way into
        > a sitcom? Or was this simply another instance, like Prada's new
        > perfume, of Gnostic references gratuitously making their way into
        > popular culture . . . completely devoid of their original context? I
        > was curious, but the various sites with episode synopses that I had
        > visited revealed no insights. I tried to look for possible "Gnostic"
        > connections with both the director and the scriptwriter. I finally
        > had to read through a transcript of the dialogue to discover the
        > reference [using your browser's FIND feature there, type "speaker"
        > and go directly to the section in question]:
        >
        > http://koti.mbnet.fi/gilmoreg/Jaksot/kasikirjoitukset/k4.13.htm
        >
        > Rather disappointing, innit. The whole thing was material for a
        > joke, and I reckon it shouldn't surprise us that when it comes to
        > such seemingly "obscure" texts, most people simply "don't get it."
        >
        > Anyhow, whenever I look at other people's evaluations on the Web of
        > such direct allusions in modern media to traditional sources, I
        > notice a very varied sampling of opinions. I guess the view that I
        > find most difficult to reconcile is that even though there is often
        > no apparent recognition of the actual significance of the material
        > by the parties appropriating it (and certainly NO effort made to
        > educate the targeted consumer), some Gnostic sympathizers appear to
        > be just fine with it anyway. I'm wondering if anyone can help me
        > understand how "mainstreaming" Gnosticism in such a way would be at
        > all beneficial . . . or desirable? Can we actually count a virtually
        > subliminal citation of Gnostic texts, especially when done in such
        > flippant fashion, as increasing the awareness of Gnosticism in the
        > public eye?
        >
        > The analogy of pearls and swine comes to mind, but I'm wondering if
        > others see it differently.
        >
        > Gerry

        I think you see it right. Me sees pigs poking in amongst the pearls.

        Regards
        --
        Mike Leavitt ac998@...
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.