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Weaving and woolen industry.

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  • Tony Hodson
    Is anyone able to tell me where I might find the above information regarding Gloucester. I am trying to find out the definition of the word ines/inds (from a
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 1, 2002
      Is anyone able to tell me where I might find the above information regarding Gloucester.

      I am trying to find out the definition of the word "ines/inds" (from a will dated 1694) in context with "rugg loome and rugg lift and ruggwooll and ines/inds"
      I think the spelling is inds.

      regards,
      Jane.
      Jane@...



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • John Loosley
      Tony, Only suggestion I have had so far is ends . If I get anything further from my textile colleagues will let you know. John ... From: Tony Hodson To:
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 4, 2002
        Tony,

        Only suggestion I have had so far is "ends". If I get anything further from my textile colleagues will let you know.

        John
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Tony Hodson
        To: gloshistory@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, March 01, 2002 8:19 PM
        Subject: [gloshistory] Weaving and woolen industry.


        Is anyone able to tell me where I might find the above information regarding Gloucester.

        I am trying to find out the definition of the word "ines/inds" (from a will dated 1694) in context with "rugg loome and rugg lift and ruggwooll and ines/inds"
        I think the spelling is inds.

        regards,
        Jane.
        Jane@...



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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      • bimini2104@aol.com
        John - Not sure what aspect of textile history interests you, having missed your earlier exchanges, owing to having joined only three days ago, but there is a
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 6, 2002
          John - Not sure what aspect of textile history interests you, having missed
          your earlier exchanges, owing to having joined only three days ago, but
          there is a fund of knowledge available on the former textile industry in the
          Frome Valley, between Stroud and Nailsworth. I can say more if you're
          interested.

          Mike


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • John Loosley
          Mike, As a member of the Stroudwater Textile Trust and living in the Stroud area I am immersed in textile history. What is your interest? Would be great to
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 6, 2002
            Mike,

            As a member of the Stroudwater Textile Trust and living in the Stroud area I am immersed in textile history.

            What is your interest? Would be great to make contact with other enthusiasts.

            John
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: bimini2104@...
            To: gloshistory@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wednesday, March 06, 2002 9:24 AM
            Subject: Re: [gloshistory] Weaving and woolen industry.


            John - Not sure what aspect of textile history interests you, having missed
            your earlier exchanges, owing to having joined only three days ago, but
            there is a fund of knowledge available on the former textile industry in the
            Frome Valley, between Stroud and Nailsworth. I can say more if you're
            interested.

            Mike


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          • John Loosley
            Tony, Have looked into the possibilities and could be either Ends meaning half lengths or half pieces of cloth or Inde being an abbreviation for indigo
            Message 5 of 11 , Mar 6, 2002
              Tony,

              Have looked into the possibilities and could be either
              "Ends" meaning half lengths or half pieces of cloth
              or
              "Inde" being an abbreviation for indigo

              John
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Tony Hodson
              To: gloshistory@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Friday, March 01, 2002 8:19 PM
              Subject: [gloshistory] Weaving and woolen industry.


              Is anyone able to tell me where I might find the above information regarding Gloucester.

              I am trying to find out the definition of the word "ines/inds" (from a will dated 1694) in context with "rugg loome and rugg lift and ruggwooll and ines/inds"
              I think the spelling is inds.

              regards,
              Jane.
              Jane@...



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Tony Hodson
              John, Thanks for your help, at least I have a rough idea now. Jane. Jane@f1.clara.co.uk ... From: John Loosley To:
              Message 6 of 11 , Mar 7, 2002
                John,

                Thanks for your help, at least I have a rough idea now.

                Jane.
                Jane@...


                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "John Loosley" <john@...>
                To: <gloshistory@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Wednesday, March 06, 2002 5:42 PM
                Subject: Re: [gloshistory] Weaving and woolen industry.


                > Tony,
                >
                > Have looked into the possibilities and could be either
                > "Ends" meaning half lengths or half pieces of cloth
                > or
                > "Inde" being an abbreviation for indigo
                >
                > John
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: Tony Hodson
                > To: gloshistory@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Friday, March 01, 2002 8:19 PM
                > Subject: [gloshistory] Weaving and woolen industry.
                >
                >
                > Is anyone able to tell me where I might find the above information
                regarding Gloucester.
                >
                > I am trying to find out the definition of the word "ines/inds" (from a
                will dated 1694) in context with "rugg loome and rugg lift and ruggwooll
                and ines/inds"
                > I think the spelling is inds.
                >
                > regards,
                > Jane.
                > Jane@...
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                > ADVERTISEMENT
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                >
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                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >
                > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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              • Tony Hodson
                Mike, Are you able to tell me the correct definition of a Gloucestershire broadweaver - I am sure that I have read somewhere, that peculiar to Gloucester, a
                Message 7 of 11 , Mar 7, 2002
                  Mike,

                  Are you able to tell me the correct definition of a Gloucestershire
                  broadweaver - I am sure that I have read somewhere, that peculiar to
                  Gloucester, a broadweaver was more inclined to be a clothier. Having both
                  terms in 1600 and 1700 wills from the Stroud area, it would be helpful to be
                  a bit better educated on such things.......

                  Jane.
                  Jane@...


                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: <bimini2104@...>
                  To: <gloshistory@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Wednesday, March 06, 2002 9:24 AM
                  Subject: Re: [gloshistory] Weaving and woolen industry.


                  > John - Not sure what aspect of textile history interests you, having
                  missed
                  > your earlier exchanges, owing to having joined only three days ago, but
                  > there is a fund of knowledge available on the former textile industry in
                  the
                  > Frome Valley, between Stroud and Nailsworth. I can say more if you're
                  > interested.
                  >
                  > Mike
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > gloshistory-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • bimini2104@aol.com
                  Jane - A broad-weaver is probably someone who was involved in the weaving of broad-cloth, which is defined in the 1964 edition of the Oxford Concise as
                  Message 8 of 11 , Mar 7, 2002
                    Jane - A broad-weaver is probably someone who was involved in the weaving
                    of broad-cloth, which is defined in the 1964 edition of the Oxford Concise
                    as fine, plain-wove, double-width, dressed black cloth. The phrase
                    "broad-cloth" was used in an Act of Parliament in 1482 and has been kept as
                    a name for quality rather than of width.

                    Can you tell me what your interest is in this topic? I will be interested
                    to read other replies you receive from the group.

                    Best wisshes, Mike


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Tony Hodson
                    Mike, My interest in the weaving history goes back to when I was child, brought up in Witney, and being shown the old weaving looms for the blankets, and using
                    Message 9 of 11 , Mar 8, 2002
                      Mike,

                      My interest in the weaving history goes back to when I was child, brought up
                      in Witney, and being shown the old weaving looms for the blankets, and using
                      them once or twice.
                      A general interest in textiles all my life, then taking up spinning a few
                      years ago. There is a small group of us who spin in an old weavers cottage
                      in Ayrshire, and there is a loom in there as well, whether it is a broadloom
                      or not, I don't know, but have "had a go" on that as well.
                      Have done some research into the origins of weaving and spinning, spindle
                      spinning and the evolution to spinning wheel.

                      If anyone can tell me more about what went on in the way of this industry,
                      especially Nailsworth and Horsley I would be very grateful.

                      Jane.
                      Jane@...
                    • bimini2104@aol.com
                      Jane, I am interested to know what it is about the (former) textile industry in Nailsworth and Horsley that concerns you. I can put you in touch with someone
                      Message 10 of 11 , Mar 9, 2002
                        Jane,
                        I am interested to know what it is about the (former) textile industry in
                        Nailsworth and Horsley that concerns you. I can put you in touch with
                        someone who could probably answer your queries far more thoroughly than I
                        can. I know this area fairly well.
                        Mike


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Tony Hodson
                        Mike, Were most of the weavers attached to a guild. What happened to the broadcloth, was there a local retail situation, were the weavers contracted to the
                        Message 11 of 11 , Mar 9, 2002
                          Mike,

                          Were most of the weavers attached to a guild.

                          What happened to the broadcloth, was there a local retail situation, were
                          the weavers contracted to the work.

                          What sort of income did the broadcloth weavers earn.

                          The will of 1694 mentions rugs, what sort of rugs were being made and for
                          whom.

                          Who did the spinning, was this down to the weavers family, or were spinners
                          contracted to the weavers.

                          Presumably spinning wheels were used, would anybody know what sort of
                          wheels.

                          The main fleece in use was no doubt Cotswold, but what else might have been
                          used.

                          From 1764 onwards, the mechanisation of spinning and weaving gradually
                          started, when did this start to affect Nailsworth and Horsley, was there any
                          social unrest at the changes being brought about.

                          Jane.
                          Jane@...
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