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Re: Word Derivation 2

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  • Stephan Schneider
    Dear Gary and dear Glosa-people, I can see you point, which was my problem with Glosa in the first place. Arbitrary endings are not an option for me, I find
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 1, 2012
      Dear Gary and dear Glosa-people,

      I can see you point, which was my problem with Glosa in the first place. Arbitrary endings are not an option for me, I find them too hard to memorize. On the other hand, it is difficult to chose a meaning for a root like "stat" for instance: It could mean anything from "stand", "station", "state", "status" including their different meanings. Which is why I came up with forms like "stati", "statio", "statione", "statu", "statura", "stato", "status" based on Latin (Interlingua). Glosa does something similar with "nati" (birth) and "natio" (nation). I have made similar modifications to greek words with regular formations of "grafi", "grafia", "grafa", "grafe", "grafo".

      This is why a made my own dialect of Glosa - "Glota", which you can find here:
      http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/glotalist/

      You're all invited. :)

      Thank you very much for your answers.

      Regards,
      Stephan
      --- In glosalist@yahoogroups.com, Gary Miller <gmillernd@...> wrote:
      >
      > Stephan-
      >
      > So far the Glosa authors have taken a different attitude toward the
      > last vowels of words. They have said:
      >
      > 1) Since the last vowel of the word is simply there to ease
      > pronunciation, it is not important (except for a few words such as
      > HOMO/HOMI, AMO/AMI). Therefore the words NOKTU, NOKTE, NOKTO should
      > all be understood as "night" to a Glosist.
      >
      > 2) The vocabulary of Interlingua is also useful for use in Glosa. This
      > again shows a lot of freedom in picking the last vowel.
      >
      > So you see the attitude is actually toward allowing a variety of word
      > endings, rather than narrowing the endings to just one. I don't think
      > they would care if you used many of the word endings you proposed.
      >
      > Saluta,
      > _ _
      > /.
      > /\   Gary
      > #
      >
    • Xavier Abadia
      Dear Stephan, and Gary. Here the point is not freedom. Of course we are free to go beyond Peano, who restricted himself to the ablative form of nouns (bucca,
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 20, 2012
        Dear Stephan, and Gary.
        Here the point is not freedom. Of course we are free to go beyond Peano, who restricted himself to the ablative form of nouns (bucca, pilo, pede, capite, manu, facie). Here the point is information: we should have a serious dictionary showing the etymologic keys. Otherwise, I agree with Stephan, the endings often seem to be arbitrary.
        By the other hand, the Glosa authors did really say that the last vowel of the word is not important? I'd like to see it quoted.

        I don't agree with Stephan that to chose a fixed meaning for a root is too difficult. For example "stat-" might mean "to be in a certain state, especially upright". There is often an etymologic meaning quite clear and we must learn it. A useful trick was teached by Ogben, the inventor of Basic English: we may get the whole meaning of a word by including a special submeaning ("stat. : ... especially upright").

        Greetings.

        --- In glosalist@yahoogroups.com, "Stephan Schneider" <stefichjo@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dear Gary and dear Glosa-people,
        >
        > I can see you point, which was my problem with Glosa in the first place. Arbitrary endings are not an option for me, I find them too hard to memorize. On the other hand, it is difficult to chose a meaning for a root like "stat" for instance: It could mean anything from "stand", "station", "state", "status" including their different meanings. Which is why I came up with forms like "stati", "statio", "statione", "statu", "statura", "stato", "status" based on Latin (Interlingua). Glosa does something similar with "nati" (birth) and "natio" (nation). I have made similar modifications to greek words with regular formations of "grafi", "grafia", "grafa", "grafe", "grafo".
        >
        > This is why a made my own dialect of Glosa - "Glota", which you can find here:
        > http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/glotalist/
        >
        > You're all invited. :)
        >
        > Thank you very much for your answers.
        >
        > Regards,
        > Stephan
        > --- In glosalist@yahoogroups.com, Gary Miller <gmillernd@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Stephan-
        > >
        > > So far the Glosa authors have taken a different attitude toward the
        > > last vowels of words. They have said:
        > >
        > > 1) Since the last vowel of the word is simply there to ease
        > > pronunciation, it is not important (except for a few words such as
        > > HOMO/HOMI, AMO/AMI). Therefore the words NOKTU, NOKTE, NOKTO should
        > > all be understood as "night" to a Glosist.
        > >
        > > 2) The vocabulary of Interlingua is also useful for use in Glosa. This
        > > again shows a lot of freedom in picking the last vowel.
        > >
        > > So you see the attitude is actually toward allowing a variety of word
        > > endings, rather than narrowing the endings to just one. I don't think
        > > they would care if you used many of the word endings you proposed.
        > >
        > > Saluta,
        > > _ _
        > > /.
        > > /\   Gary
        > > #
        > >
        >
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