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Re: [globalvillages] Factor E Farm, How do we learn?

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  • Jeff Buderer
    Hi All, I have been reading up quite a bit on this issue lately. I am sad because I know how hard Marcin has worked at this. However I do recall a moment when
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 7, 2009
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      Hi All,

      I have been reading up quite a bit on this issue lately.

      I am sad because I know how hard Marcin has worked at this. However I do recall a moment when we were together at the Sustainable Villages Conf organized by sustainability pioneer Steve Troy and I just sensed that Marcin while having good intent about the need to become sustainable he was in my view overlooking and underemphasizing the community and human dimension the touchy feely aspect of living in community.

      The challenge that I can see from this and my experience at Arcosanti is that it is not easy for people designing projects to consider the authentic needs of the people participating in the live/work project. Interestingly I saw in both projects references to this idea of "benevolent dictatorship."

      Now it is important for me to say here that I am not siding with Ben on this as I do believe there are greviances on both sides that are legitimate. However The bottom line is it is not encouraging to me that Brittany had left the Factor E project. When i was there a year or so ago with Andrius I saw the significance of Brittany providing what I saw as something that Marcin needed in his project but could or would not by his nature easily address - that need for human warmth and compassion that is more than just about appropriate technologies. So they complemented each other well I thought but the neglect of her needs to create a livable and comfortable space was it seems what led to her eventual departure. That to me is benevolent dictatorship or not, in my view its a sign that the needs of the people are secondary to the needs of promoting an ideology at Factor E.

      We need to look at real models of how we can come together to find locally appropriate solutions to our grossly unsustainable and unhealthy human civilization. IN many cases, in projects with approaches and visions such as Factor E or Arcosanti the technology or methodology becomes an obsession that overrides the real need that many of us have to engage each other in fulfilling and meaningful ways in the development of appropriate technologies that can provide us with a deepfelt need to live in harmony with each other and the envirionment while empowering us with modern amenities that improve our lives.

      In reading some of the recent postings I am not sure these issues will now be addressed at Factor E. However I do hope that something good comes out of the workshop. Unfortunately I cannot attend as I will be in Taiwan in Sept.

      Jeff

      On Thu, Aug 6, 2009 at 3:49 PM, Benoit Couture <benoitctr@...> wrote:
       

      Salut Andrius, Ben, Jeremy, Marcin and all,
       
      I am saddened by the intensity of discord, but not surprised.  A few weeks back, Andrius mentioned something about "giant egos".  Not easy to deal with! 
      My endeavor of the Edmonton Reconciliation Centre is to be developed as the basis for all other endeavors of the community. 
      I concentrate all other endeavors as the coming together for the sake of Building the Recovery Road from Self-Destruction to Self-Control and Community Self-Government, so as to offer a model of the Kingdom of Heaven on earth as it is in heaven. 
      The Kingdom of Heaven is justice, peace and joy by the Holy Spirit Who feeds humans with the presence and knowledge of God. 
      The Reconciliation Centre is to cultivate personal peace with God and with one another and the Recovery Road is the personal and communal discipline for sustainable renewal as self-destruction is the daily practice of denying myself, to pick up the cross which destroys the self that cannot know God and to follow the Christ-Jesus so that eternal life feeds each one's renewal while providing direction for the day's activities.
      Apart from such basis, the world of darkness is going to keep on re-inventing  itself, within the gearing of the first nature we receive at birth, being the lust of the eyes, the lust of the flesh and the pride of life, where the Father's love is absent and where corruption festers in the power of evil.
      We need to go from the spiritual division of human DNA to the organic experience of spiritual unity. 
      Without such a basic agreement to govern all who are involved, there will be a constant repeat of the same old world, as it is the nature of the beast we are all born with from mom and dad.
      That is why, in order to make it all simple and free from religiosity, the full expression of the Reconciliation Centre and of the Recovery Road is concentrated in The Perpetual Celebration of Easter which manifests the victory of eternal life over death, upon the Land of Emmanuel, which is the personal inner space and the communal outer space occupied by the Presence of God in our midst.
      Giant egos usually hate such thoughts, when learning to be a servant in love and truth is not sought after.  Let us each beware of our own heart for the bible says that it is deceitful and evil above all things.
       
      ...may all blessings be with us all...
      Benoit Couture
      Edmonton, Canada
       
         

      --- On Wed, 8/5/09, Andrius Kulikauskas <ms@...> wrote:

      From: Andrius Kulikauskas <ms@...>
      Subject: [mendenyo] Factor E Farm, How do we learn?
      To: socialagriculture@yahoogroups.com, mendenyo@yahoogroups.com, globalvillages@yahoogroups.com, "Marcin Jakubowski" <joseph.dolittle@...>
      Received: Wednesday, August 5, 2009, 11:41 AM


       
      Ben,

      I share your account with Franz Nahrada and his Global Villages working
      group
      http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/globalvill ages/
      I'm sad that you and Jeremy are leaving in such haste. I ask Marcin
      Jakubowski to reconsider that you might leave without needless hurt.
      I've been in your situation (kicked off a summer camp in Vis, Croatia)
      where, after pleading, I was granted to leave in the morning rather than
      the evening.

      I think that leading an on-the-ground community like Factor E Farm is
      enormously challenging and all kinds of slack might be given the
      leaders. Gandhi had his pesky sides, too. But can we find a way to
      acknowledge these misfortunes and learn from them? and evolve?

      Marcin's Open Source Ecology is positive in many important ways,
      including getting lots done, but also openly documenting failures along
      with successes. I note:
      and also I note Mathew Lippincott's "Why I'm not a true fan anymore"
      http://factorefarm. org/content/ why-im-not- true-fan- anymore
      and Brittany Gill's "The Brick that Broke the Camel's Back"
      http://openfarmtech .org/weblog/ ?p=451

      Franz and I and Samwel Kongere are all inspired by Marcin's work. We're
      interested in developing our own on-the-ground communities. So I point
      to Factor E Farm as an ongoing "case study" to learn from: what to do,
      and what not to do, and hopefully, why.

      Marcin yesterday celebrated the 3rd anniversary of settling the land:
      http://openfarmtech .org/weblog/ ?p=971
      A lot achieved, especially in technological innovation. But not a
      single person mentioned or thanked.

      A future without people? Can we consider alternatives?

      Ben, Jeremy, please keep us posted on your future. Your dreams,
      endeavors, values, investigations and adventures.

      Ben, Jeremy, thank you for your help to link Minciu Sodas with Factor E
      Farm.

      Writing from the village of Dukiskes,

      Andrius

      Andrius Kulikauskas
      Minciu Sodas
      http://www.ms. lt
      ms@...
      +370 699 30003
      Dukiskes, Lithuania

      Ben de Vries wrote: "Fascist E Farm"
      > Well,
      >
      > I had hoped to be able to temper my report somewhat, but this latest
      > turn of events is really over the top.
      >
      > Marcin Jakubowski, and his guest of 3 days, Inga, who threatened me
      > with a stick yesterday over chores, have decided that it is expedient
      > to remove Jeremy and myself from factor e farm. The original
      > discussion 2 days ago was that we would have two weeks to make
      > arrangements. I was OK with this, seeing that my work was not
      > appreciated (30 hour weeks of mostly digging to plant), nor paid.
      > Jeremy was here 8 months, through the worst of winter, during the time
      > that Marcin threw out his girlfriend (71% owner of the land) because
      > she would not make more bricks. I think she would agree with me on
      > this. Jeremy was instrumental in that he provided the labor to build
      > the workshop.
      >
      > The pretext for todays accelerated action was that we "had sabotaged
      > the water system". This failure has happened before, and I think is
      > either part failure or design flaw. Like the burning of the bundestag,
      > it does however provide a convenient pretext to take action against
      > anyone who might disagree, or request review of any point. That would
      > be us. To me, this is evidence not of sabotage, but of delusional
      > paranoia, or the thought that was expressed that we "are a threat to
      > this project". I see the threat clearly: we would alert people who
      > might be fresh victims of his usership- he ate all our food, used our
      > labor, had no problem with me spending my money to improve the place,
      > used J to build his website, and pushed for more and more, without any
      > but the most forced expressions of thanks.
      >
      > The acceleration is from 2 weeks to 4 hours. We have been told to "get
      > out" under the threat of the sheriff doing so for us.
      >
      > Their admission is as follows: "This is a dictatorship" .
      >
      > I could not have stated it more clearly. Just so you know what you're
      > in for if you want to visit, and just so you know what you are paying
      > for if you contribute. I am something of a student of intentional
      > communities, and particularly interested in why they fail. This is a
      > textbook case.
      >
      > My apologies to anyone who this does not concern.
      >
      > --
      > Ben de Vries
      > Certified Permaculture Designer
      >
      >
      >
      > NOTICE
      > This email and any attachments may contain confidential or legally
      > privileged information or copyright material. You should not read,
      > copy, use or disclose them without authorization. If you are not an
      > intended recipient, please notify the sender immediately by return
      > email and then delete both messages. We do not accept liability in
      > connection with computer virus, data corruption, delay, interruption,
      > unauthorized access or unauthorized amendment. Please do not remove
      > this notice.
      >
      > I find it rather easy to portray a businessman. Being bland, rather
      > cruel and incompetent comes naturally to me.
      > - John Cleese
      >
      > Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake: One of her characters asks, "As a
      > species we're doomed by hope, then?" By hope? Well, yes. Hope drives
      > us to invent new fixes for old messes, which in turn create ever more
      > dangerous messes. Hope elects the politician with the biggest empty
      > promise; and as any stockbroker or lottery seller knows, most of us
      > will take a slim hope over prudent and predictable frugality. Hope,
      > like greed, fuels the engine of capitalism.


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    • Benoit Couture
      Franz wrote:   All I can say is you simply cant get rid of your self in this world.   Without Jesus-Christ s mission and His Spirit to operate the
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 7, 2009
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        Franz wrote:
         
        "All I can say is you simply cant get rid of your self in this world."
         
        Without Jesus-Christ's mission and His Spirit to operate the "surgery", that is true.  That is why Jesus is the Christ of God.  His death is the all-inclusive death of all humans by which the destruction of the first nature gets to be applied to make way for the resurected, eternal life. 
        This is a "happening" of genuine rebirth by the Spirit in the human spirit, not a "god in your pocket" kind of aproach that you describe.
        The law of the Spirit of life has set me free from the law of sim and of death.
         
        Franz goes on with:
         
        "I have seen too many people using religion as a tools to plague their
        environment with a super - ego that disguises as selflessness. Its so
        comfortable to have god in your pocket,  it relieves you from
        responsibility and allows you to always keep a position of moral
        superiority."
        Not so when the daily discipline of the cross is followed.
         
        Franz goes on with:

        "The social part is another important key. Instead of destroying the self, we need to
        gently transform it and evolve it, unfold its social and creative potential."
         
        That is from the second, spiritual, eternal nature, not from the first earthly nature as history demonstrated and unfolds so clearly right before our very own eyes. 
         
        Benoit


        --- On Fri, 8/7/09, Franz Nahrada <f.nahrada@...> wrote:

        From: Franz Nahrada <f.nahrada@...>
        Subject: Re: [globalvillages] Factor E Farm, How do we learn?
        To: globalvillages@yahoogroups.com
        Received: Friday, August 7, 2009, 1:25 AM

         
        Benoit writes :

        >The Reconciliation Centre is to cultivate personal peace with God and
        >with one another and the Recovery Road is the personal and communal
        >discipline for sustainable renewal as self-destruction is the daily
        >practice of denying myself, to pick up the cross which destroys the self
        >that cannot know God and to follow the Christ-Jesus so that eternal life
        >feeds each one's renewal while providing direction for the day's
        >activities.
        >Apart from such basis, the world of darkness is going to keep
        >on re-inventing itself, within the gearing of the first nature we
        >receive at birth, being the lust of the eyes, the lust of the flesh and
        >the pride of life, where the Father's love is absent and where corruption
        >festers in the power of evil.
        >We need to go from the spiritual division of human DNA to the organic
        >experience of spiritual unity.
        >Without such a basic agreement to govern all who are involved, there will
        >be a constant repeat of the same old world, as it is the nature of the
        >beast we are all born with from mom and dad.

        Benoit,

        All I can say is you simply cant get rid of your self in this world. I
        have seen too many people using religion as a tools to plague their
        environment with a super - ego that disguises as selflessness. Its so
        comfortable to have god in your pocket, it relieves you from
        responsibility and allows you to always keep a position of moral
        superiority.

        I agree with you that the instance shows us that technological development
        is only one part of the GlobalVillages development process. The social
        part is another important key. Instead of destroying the self, we need to
        gently transform it and evolve it, unfold its social and creative
        potential.

        I found a free book produced by the Global Ecovillage Movement (by a
        review by Earthaven) which migh hold some answers about the question of
        leadership that was and is obviously totally absent in this whole affair:

        http://www.ecovilla genews.org/ wiki/index. php/Review: _Beyond_You_ and_Me

        The book is freely downloadable. I think its worth it. If I can and find
        time I will bring some of the gems of one particular author to our
        attention, Manitonquat.

        Franz



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      • Patrick Reilly
        To all: I will start this message that my modest contribution to this community so far has been to advise on certain intellectual property matters. I am
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 7, 2009
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          To all:

          I will start this message that my modest contribution to this community so far has been to advise on certain intellectual property matters.

          I am writing today to say that I have great admiration for the intentions and integrity aspresented in this forum, but that I am increasingly weirder out by the expressions of religious ideology.

          I am culturally an Irish Catholic born and raised in Philadelphia, PA.  The strain of Roman Catholocism I was viciously subjected to as a child left me highly suspicious of all Abrahamic justifications for cruelty and psychic conformity.

          I believe that the reason I am writing today is to senstize this group to the reality that spiritual ideology can appear toxic to many who might be attracted to supporting the goal of preserving the life bearing capacity of the Earth 

          I am certainly not requesting self-censorship, but rather asking that impressions made by exchange that claims a spiritual "certainty" as justification for imposing viewpoints or ending inquiry be immediately brought within the norms of a compassionate, rationale and outcome-focussed community.

          Otherwise, this group will loose much potential support without detection by the primary correspondents.

          I will add by noting that in the course of my 53 years of life I have personally experienced the toxic effects  the US and many other countries by the manipulation of homegrown "religious" leaders.  

          Sincerely,

          Pat Reilly


             

          Sent from my iPhone

          On Aug 7, 2009, at 9:07, Jeff Buderer <buderman@...> wrote:

           

          Hi All,

          I have been reading up quite a bit on this issue lately.

          I am sad because I know how hard Marcin has worked at this. However I do recall a moment when we were together at the Sustainable Villages Conf organized by sustainability pioneer Steve Troy and I just sensed that Marcin while having good intent about the need to become sustainable he was in my view overlooking and underemphasizing the community and human dimension the touchy feely aspect of living in community.

          The challenge that I can see from this and my experience at Arcosanti is that it is not easy for people designing projects to consider the authentic needs of the people participating in the live/work project. Interestingly I saw in both projects references to this idea of "benevolent dictatorship."

          Now it is important for me to say here that I am not siding with Ben on this as I do believe there are greviances on both sides that are legitimate. However The bottom line is it is not encouraging to me that Brittany had left the Factor E project. When i was there a year or so ago with Andrius I saw the significance of Brittany providing what I saw as something that Marcin needed in his project but could or would not by his nature easily address - that need for human warmth and compassion that is more than just about appropriate technologies. So they complemented each other well I thought but the neglect of her needs to create a livable and comfortable space was it seems what led to her eventual departure. That to me is benevolent dictatorship or not, in my view its a sign that the needs of the people are secondary to the needs of promoting an ideology at Factor E.

          We need to look at real models of how we can come together to find locally appropriate solutions to our grossly unsustainable and unhealthy human civilization. IN many cases, in projects with approaches and visions such as Factor E or Arcosanti the technology or methodology becomes an obsession that overrides the real need that many of us have to engage each other in fulfilling and meaningful ways in the development of appropriate technologies that can provide us with a deepfelt need to live in harmony with each other and the envirionment while empowering us with modern amenities that improve our lives.

          In reading some of the recent postings I am not sure these issues will now be addressed at Factor E. However I do hope that something good comes out of the workshop. Unfortunately I cannot attend as I will be in Taiwan in Sept.

          Jeff

          On Thu, Aug 6, 2009 at 3:49 PM, Benoit Couture <benoitctr@yahoo. com> wrote:
           

          Salut Andrius, Ben, Jeremy, Marcin and all,
           
          I am saddened by the intensity of discord, but not surprised.  A few weeks back, Andrius mentioned something about "giant egos".  Not easy to deal with! 
          My endeavor of the Edmonton Reconciliation Centre is to be developed as the basis for all other endeavors of the community. 
          I concentrate all other endeavors as the coming together for the sake of Building the Recovery Road from Self-Destruction to Self-Control and Community Self-Government, so as to offer a model of the Kingdom of Heaven on earth as it is in heaven. 
          The Kingdom of Heaven is justice, peace and joy by the Holy Spirit Who feeds humans with the presence and knowledge of God. 
          The Reconciliation Centre is to cultivate personal peace with God and with one another and the Recovery Road is the personal and communal discipline for sustainable renewal as self-destruction is the daily practice of denying myself, to pick up the cross which destroys the self that cannot know God and to follow the Christ-Jesus so that eternal life feeds each one's renewal while providing direction for the day's activities.
          Apart from such basis, the world of darkness is going to keep on re-inventing   itself, within the gearing of the first nature we receive at birth, being the lust of the eyes, the lust of the flesh and the pride of life, where the Father's love is absent and where corruption festers in the power of evil.
          We need to go from the spiritual division of human DNA to the organic experience of spiritual unity. 
          Without such a basic agreement to govern all who are involved, there will be a constant repeat of the same old world, as it is the nature of the beast we are all born with from mom and dad.
          That is why, in order to make it all simple and free from religiosity, the full expression of the Reconciliation Centre and of the Recovery Road is concentrated in The Perpetual Celebration of Easter which manifests the victory of eternal life over death, upon the Land of Emmanuel, which is the personal inner space and the communal outer space occupied by the Presence of God in our midst.
          Giant egos usually hate such thoughts, when learning to be a servant in love and truth is not sought after.  Let us each beware of our own heart for the bible says that it is deceitful and evil above all things.
           
          ...may all blessings be with us all...
          Benoit Couture
          Edmonton, Canada
           
             

          --- On Wed, 8/5/09, Andrius Kulikauskas <ms@...> wrote:

          From: Andrius Kulikauskas <ms@...>
          Subject: [mendenyo] Factor E Farm, How do we learn?
          To: socialagriculture@ yahoogroups. com, mendenyo@yahoogroups.com, globalvillages@ yahoogroups. com, "Marcin Jakubowski" <joseph.dolittle@gmail.com>
          Received: Wednesday, August 5, 2009, 11:41 AM


           
          Ben,

          I share your account with Franz Nahrada and his Global Villages working
          group
          http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/globalvill ages/
          I'm sad that you and Jeremy are leaving in such haste. I ask Marcin
          Jakubowski to reconsider that you might leave without needless hurt.
          I've been in your situation (kicked off a summer camp in Vis, Croatia)
          where, after pleading, I was granted to leave in the morning rather than
          the evening.

          I think that leading an on-the-ground community like Factor E Farm is
          enormously challenging and all kinds of slack might be given the
          leaders. Gandhi had his pesky sides, too. But can we find a way to
          acknowledge these misfortunes and learn from them? and evolve?

          Marcin's Open Source Ecology is positive in many important ways,
          including getting lots done, but also openly documenting failures along
          with successes. I note:
          and also I note Mathew Lippincott's "Why I'm not a true fan anymore"
          http://factorefarm. org/content/ why-im-not- true-fan- anymore
          and Brittany Gill's "The Brick that Broke the Camel's Back"
          http://openfarmtech .org/weblog/ ?p=451

          Franz and I and Samwel Kongere are all inspired by Marcin's work. We're
          interested in developing our own on-the-ground communities. So I point
          to Factor E Farm as an ongoing "case study" to learn from: what to do,
          and what not to do, and hopefully, why.

          Marcin yesterday celebrated the 3rd anniversary of settling the land:
          http://openfarmtech .org/weblog/ ?p=971
          A lot achieved, especially in technological innovation. But not a
          single person mentioned or thanked.

          A future without people? Can we consider alternatives?

          Ben, Jeremy, please keep us posted on your future. Your dreams,
          endeavors, values, investigations and adventures.

          Ben, Jeremy, thank you for your help to link Minciu Sodas with Factor E
          Farm.

          Writing from the village of Dukiskes,

          Andrius

          Andrius Kulikauskas
          Minciu Sodas
          http://www.ms. lt
          ms@...
          +370 699 30003
          Dukiskes, Lithuania

          Ben de Vries wrote: "Fascist E Farm"
          > Well,
          >
          > I had hoped to be able to temper my report somewhat, but this latest
          > turn of events is really over the top.
          >
          > Marcin Jakubowski, and his guest of 3 days, Inga, who threatened me
          > with a stick yesterday over chores, have decided that it is expedient
          > to remove Jeremy and myself from factor e farm. The original
          > discussion 2 days ago was that we would have two weeks to make
          > arrangements. I was OK with this, seeing that my work was not
          > appreciated (30 hour weeks of mostly digging to plant), nor paid.
          > Jeremy was here 8 months, through the worst of winter, during the time
          > that Marcin threw out his girlfriend (71% owner of the land) because
          > she would not make more bricks. I think she would agree with me on
          > this. Jeremy was instrumental in that he provided the labor to build
          > the workshop.
          >
          > The pretext for todays accelerated action was that we "had sabotaged
          > the water system". This failure has happened before, and I think is
          > either part failure or design flaw. Like the burning of the bundestag,
          > it does however provide a convenient pretext to take action against
          > anyone who might disagree, or request review of any point. That would
          > be us. To me, this is evidence not of sabotage, but of delusional
          > paranoia, or the thought that was expressed that we "are a threat to
          > this project". I see the threat clearly: we would alert people who
          > might be fresh victims of his usership- he ate all our food, used our
          > labor, had no problem with me spending my money to improve the place,
          > used J to build his website, and pushed for more and more, without any
          > but the most forced expressions of thanks.
          >
          > The acceleration is from 2 weeks to 4 hours. We have been told to "get
          > out" under the threat of the sheriff doing so for us.
          >
          > Their admission is as follows: "This is a dictatorship" .
          >
          > I could not have stated it more clearly. Just so you know what you're
          > in for if you want to visit, and just so you know what you are paying
          > for if you contribute. I am something of a student of intentional
          > communities, and particularly interested in why they fail. This is a
          > textbook case.
          >
          > My apologies to anyone who this does not concern.
          >
          > --
          > Ben de Vries
          > Certified Permaculture Designer
          >
          >
          >
          > NOTICE
          > This email and any attachments may contain confidential or legally
          > privileged information or copyright material. You should not read,
          > copy, use or disclose them without authorization. If you are not an
          > intended recipient, please notify the sender immediately by return
          > email and then delete both messages. We do not accept liability in
          > connection with computer virus, data corruption, delay, interruption,
          > unauthorized access or unauthorized amendment. Please do not remove
          > this notice.
          >
          > I find it rather easy to portray a businessman. Being bland, rather
          > cruel and incompetent comes naturally to me.
          > - John Cleese
          >
          > Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake: One of her characters asks, "As a
          > species we're doomed by hope, then?" By hope? Well, yes. Hope drives
          > us to invent new fixes for old messes, which in turn create ever more
          > dangerous messes. Hope elects the politician with the biggest empty
          > promise; and as any stockbroker or lottery seller knows, most of us
          > will take a slim hope over prudent and predictable frugality. Hope,
          > like greed, fuels the engine of capitalism.


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        • Franz Nahrada
          Hello globalvillagers, The latest developments on Factor E Farm can be followed here: http://openfarmtech.org/weblog/ there were very interesting critical
          Message 4 of 10 , Aug 16, 2009
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            Hello globalvillagers,

            The latest developments on Factor E Farm can be followed here:

            http://openfarmtech.org/weblog/

            there were very interesting critical posts by Michel Bauwens

            http://blog.p2pfoundation.net/crisis-at-the-factor-e-farm/2009/08/10

            and by Stefan Meretz.

            http://www.keimform.de/2009/08/13/projects-in-crisis-for-example-factor-e-farm/

            Marcin has answered privately and will explain his position tomorrow on
            Factor E Farm. The main point is that misconceptions from both sides led
            to totally differing expectations and that he wants to intrioduce a much
            clearer collaboration policy.

            However, he has one piece on this policy already published, and thats a
            declaration of Factor E Farm principles (early release)

            http://openfarmtech.org/index.php?title=Factor_e_Farm_Position_Statement

            but also in relation to that
            http://openfarmtech.org/index.php?title=One_Month_Project-Based_Visits
            http://openfarmtech.org/index.php?title=Getting_What_You_Want

            I replied to this and I put this here. See below

            Vinay Gupta is drawing opposite conclusions, and I quote his post in P2PF
            blog here, too. See at bottom.



            1. My comments to Marcins FEF Principles. Please excuse the typos.



            Marcin,

            thank you for the clear declaration. At this point I want to clearly state
            my alternatives, which will help us to finally analyze the differences in
            our approach. I do not want to correct anything in the Wiki, because your
            position is coherent and I do not see much chance that it can be brought
            easily to consensus with my position. Maybe we publish both positions and
            unfold free discussion about it.

            .
            1.

            >FeF is an experiment. It is a development laboratory for tools,
            >technologies, and techniques that lead to post-scarcity by means of
            >optimal production techniques. (optimal is a loaded word. It includes all
            >principles of OSE)

            - Production Techniques alone cannot be key to the design of Global
            Villages. From the very beginning a Global Village is equally
            experimenting with consensus - building technologies that allow a
            commununity to really take care of its metabolism. The commons will be the
            liveblood of future societies again. Maternal values will become important
            for the introduction of flow economies.

            2.

            >Its presently technocentric approach is only a step for developing
            >resilient economies. FeF is dedicated to becoming a first, living example
            >of such a resilient community. This is on top of being a development
            >laboratory for the required tools and techniques. We are interested in
            >forming a foundation for replicable, post-scarcity, resilient
            >communities.

            - Is it more important to maintain small steel furnaces in every village
            or will there be still urban centers? We dont know. All we know is that
            each and every technolgy is shaped by social preferences. It is merely
            impossible to discern positive social preferences from the drawing board.
            Without having a society of users from the beginning, the designers view
            might be extremely flawed. Thats the structural limit of FeF and I do not
            see it met by the step model.

            3.

            >Its approach is radical, in that we're developing an integrated toolset
            >for creating resilient communities, which make no compromise related to
            >global geopolitics.

            - I do not know what you exactly mean by geopolitical, but there is a
            factual necessity to run along with powers-to-be and not be atacked by
            them. The art of a true revolutionary is to grow the new form of society
            like a seed within the old, make it convincing, appealing and attractive,
            both in terms of structural leverage for the dominant classes as well as
            in terms of expanding freedom for the supressed. That requires
            compromises, skills, negociations and communication, social and
            polit-economical insight and knowledge - and also dedication and clear
            vision. Its deplorable that almost nowhere you find these qualities
            unified. A myth of mere "resistance" has successfully crippled our
            emancipatory potential for decades, which was mainly, but not only forming
            on the political left.

            4.

            >We believe that complete, post-scarcity economies can be created on a
            >scale as small as individual land parcels of village scale, by using
            >modern technology and ancient wisdom.

            - That is counter to my belief. Even Mao did need a larger regional area
            for a peoples commune, the renmin gongshe would encompass about 5000
            single households. Thats also the number Claude Lewenz estimates for
            village town to develop a local economy, that supports a decent level of
            life with a sophisticated level of technicalities and culture. Even if we
            take away the 94% of professions that are more or less deeply affected by
            monetary dominated society, we need many new professions to facilitate the
            complex function of a resilient and sustaiunable microcosm.
            - Even that said, the total optimum distribution of population will never
            be 100% villages. There will be enough remaining endavours where economy
            of scale remains. The rough formula for global villages is 80% villages,
            20% cities. there will be renaiscance of the Small Towns as well. The
            total economy will adjust to that base, and cities will perform hub
            functions by means of telecommunication, like telemedicine, but also
            physical functions, like hospitals.

            5.

            >We understand that a prerequisite to such communities is personal and
            >political growth and transformation on part of the individuals taking
            >part in this experiment.

            - the meaning of growth and transformation is manyfold. In fact the
            ultimate purpose of global villages is health; its the total enjoyment of
            our physical side, which carries a spiritual core within connecting us
            with heaven (our aspirations) and earth (our nature) and all beings. Our
            purpose now is to bring these different side in harmony, rediscover and
            enable with the help of technology the healing power within us. Health is
            another world of becoming whole. Global Villages will allow us to choose
            and enjoy among all possibilities that human cultures have created; they
            will be diverse in approach and also resonate to different sides of the
            human being. They will also be social experiments. This is not just about
            replicating - its about evolving.


            2. Vinays post with very very opposing conclusions in P2P blog:



            I joke that open source is best done by autistic sociopaths. Let me
            flesh out that joke a little.

            I've talked to Marcin at length. He's very. very, very smart. He's
            smarter than you. How do I know that? Because he's the second or
            third smartest person I've met, and I've spent time with people like
            Amory Lovins.

            At that point, and not to put too fine a point on it, not all
            opinions about how a project should be run are created equal. Being
            smart is not a license to tell people what to do, but if a smart
            person stands up and says "I'm going to change the world by doing X,
            Y and Z - do you want to help me?" then, if you show up to help, you
            better actually be willing to help.

            This is pretty simple: Marcin's published a roadmap about what he
            wants to do on the farm. It's huge, big, complex but all the bits I
            have the expertise to check look great. If people are showing up to
            help get that roadmap built - and it's the only thing Marcin is
            interested in, and he's completely explicit about that - and then not
            actually getting things done, I think that Marcin is perfectly within
            his rights and correct in asking them to leave.

            Let me say that again: Marcin's published a roadmap and asked for
            people to help. He's one of the smartest people in the world. If you
            want to help get that roadmap built, that's what's happening on the
            farm.

            Consensus decision making has destroyed the commune movement in
            America. It is the absolute plague of the Left and of organized
            Anarchism. It brings the decision-making of groups down to the level
            which can make it past the group-think and status-based herd
            psychology of social groups.

            The open source world does not run on that kind of consensus. It runs
            on capable individuals spending their lives building things for the
            common good. Consensus, where it is used, is not about universal
            agreement in the way that the commune movement has used it, but about
            a rough agreement between independent actors - a subtle but vital
            distinction.

            The problem here is a clash of cultures: hard-edged performance-
            oriented engineering culture, and values-oriented political culture.

            Value politics have produced nothing of substance since the 1960s.
            Let me repeat that: value politics have produced nothing of substance
            since the 1960s. It is not working. People sink their lives into
            political organizing, and it amounts to no real change in global
            living conditions at the end of the day.

            It is time for value politics, and the crap decision-making
            methodologies which accompany it, to get out of the way and make room
            for the engineers to actually fix the problem.

            If you don't like Marcin's management style, don't work with him.
            But, as a professional engineer, he's about average for the people
            who are just really, really good. This isn't about a group hug, this
            is about solving the world's problems with technology.

            Vinay Gupta

            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

            The discussion is now at a point where it makes sense to have it here.
            Its not about FeF any more, its about principles.


            Franz
          • Mark Roest
            Hello All (please post to groups Andrius included, which I am not a member of yet), Here are some thoughts in response to Andrius question, But can we find a
            Message 5 of 10 , Aug 16, 2009
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              Hello All (please post to groups Andrius included, which I am not a member of yet),

              Here are some thoughts in response to Andrius' question, "But can we find a way to
              acknowledge these misfortunes and learn from them? and evolve?"

              One way we might learn is to understand that "western civilization" was totally consumed by the dominator paradigm from a few thousand years BC to the present, and that the only places where we can learn what life can be about are those people who are consciously pioneering the partnership paradigm / gift economy / communitarianism / mystical paths / new age / recreation of spiritual cultures / connection with all our relations (the other animal and plant beings with whom we share the planet) / deep science (from the latest physics to ecology and ethology), and in or from those villages where colonialism did not really intrude, and no one enslaved the people or conquered them or settled in their territory in large numbers after being displaced from their own homeland / ecosystem, and no major natural or man-made disaster destroyed their ecosystem, and a dominator class did not arise on its own.

              These are the places, along with looking deeply within our own hearts, and looking at our children before they get spiritually defeated, where we can find enlightened awareness of the oneness of all life, indeed of all existence. We can also find it in many spiritual and mystical teachers, which can include teachers of yoga and some of the martial arts.

              We might also look at nature videos of chimpanzees working to balance their social relations within their group, but killing male members of groups on adjoining territories to access their females and food, and male alpha baboons terrorizing all other members of their groups, solely concerned with their dominance. We might read Jane Goodall's book (I forget which one, but it was written within the last decade) in which she describes what happened when the group of twelve she had studied for many years, chronicling their care for each other and acceptance of her as a close observer, split up, with five setting up an adjoining and overlapping territory.

              She describes finding tracks, five times, that told the story of an individual ambushed by a group and having its limbs twisted and broken, attacked many ways, and being left maimed, dead or dying. She tells of adolescent males getting very excited before leaving with the older males on one of these hunts [this is just like young men volunteering for war, and mobs getting worked up before a lynching]. She explains it as despeciation -- members of a group deciding that others of the same family, or known territory-holders or strangers of the same species, are 'not like us', not protected by a social code of interdependence, and subject to being hunted like meat animals.

              Among humans, despeciation was strategically refined into class and caste systems, and slavery. Instead of killing the 'other', dominate and subjugate them, 'assert authority and dominion over them', and exploit them for production of needed goods and symbols of power and status for the dominators -- in fact, by their existence and condition, they ARE symbols of power and status for the dominators. But whenever we set off to war, or subjugate and imprison minority-group males (as California does to such an extent that our prisons have twice the number of inmates they were designed for), we have plunged ourselves into the raw genetic depths of despeciation.

              Our entire culture is permeated by despeciation. I am old enough (62) to have lived as a child in a highly segregated place before the civil rights movement (Maryland, just outside of Washington, D.C.), where blacks were forced to use separate, unmaintained drinking fountains, parts of town, schools, etc., and forced to ride on the back of the bus, and lynched for looking at a white woman with interest (and anti-miscegnation laws were enforced and taught). Where the sheriff dropped in on us after ten at night to sit down at our kitchen table, tell my parents to sit down with him, and brag about catching a black burglar in his kitchen and hitting him on the head with his gun so hard he collected over a cup of blood from the floor -- while I watched in hiding, from the bottom of the stairs. Where in my first day at school, checking in at the principal's office, I saw two black girls deliberately humiliated by making them go back to class, after ten days at home getting rid of lice infestations, wearing large pink bandages on their heads. Where days later a girl told me, "you can't sit with us -- you don't have blue eyes," and when asked why that mattered, said, "my parents told me I can't play with anyone who doesn't have blue eyes." Where I watched two men on the bench in front of a store bragging to each other about beating their wives 'to keep them in line' -- just like baboons would do, if two alpha males met at the bar to get drunk, and could talk about their lives.

              Now, a few days ago, I heard a right-wing demonstrator telling a reporter for KPFA radio (94.1 FM) that there are 40 million people without health insurance, and there aren't enough doctors to treat those people without rationing care for those of us who have health insurance, and doctors are telling their children to go into other professions, so [essentially], we cannot change the system because that would compromise the demonstrator's resources. This person was knowingly saying that his well-being is predicated on consigning 40 million people to lives without health care, hence much suffering and early deaths -- and the reporter did not even state that this is the real meaning of the demonstrator's words! Despeciation is so pervasive in our culture, and so dominant, that we do not even confront it openly wherever we see it. I knew at the age of 5 that if I did so in Maryland, I would be placing myself and my family in grave jeopardy. Any adult male I saw could be a member of the Ku Klux Klan.

              Dominance in the sense of authority, as in the government, or the captain of a ship, or "the king of my own castle", and the institution of property, are variations of the dominator paradigm, and a system for maintaining economic disparities. If you read an interview with Rebecca Adamson, by Sarah van Gelder, on page 49 of the summer 2009 issue of yes! magazine (www.yesmagazine.org), on Age-Old Wisdom for the New Economy, you will find a systematic explanation of the philosophy of indigenous cultures, with an example of how they teach toddlers to go out to be their own person, and come back to share. "Adamson, a Cherokee, is founder of the First Nations Development Institute and First Peoples Worldwide. She works globally with grassroots tribal communities, sits on the boards of the Corporation for Enterprise Development and the Calvert Social Investment Fund, and is an advisor to the United Nations on rural development."

              We can understand the demonstrator above through Rebecca's words. "We keep going into this paradigm of scarcity because fear is good for the capitalistic system. If you want to drive consumption, you've got to be fear based. But God is in the space and silence. That is where it's sacred. You look up on a starry night, and you feel yourself unfold, and that silence is where God is."

              Her juxtaposition goes to the root of humanity's development of spiritual traditions. We all have chimpanzee and baboon behavior in our genes. But we also have a wisdom and love that transcends the dominator paradigm! Jane Goodall wrote that after seeing [the genocide] unfold over a year and a half, she was unable to work for over a year, until she read about a female chimpanzee in a London zoo. This female would respond to two males starting to show signs of conflict with each other by moving between them, and then going back and forth between them, grooming each one and pulling it a bit back toward the other one, until the males are standing on each side of her, grooming her, [and the fight-or-flight response is washed away].

              So we have both dominator and partnership in our blood and genes and minds. We have only to learn how and why to choose, and how to embed partnership in our culture once more! A big hint: learn by doing. A bigger lesson: this comes from the same place as the human experience of spirituality, which opens us to the Ground of Being, where "no matter what we say, All is One" (Annie Besant, an early leader of the Theosophical Society, in a book whose title I did not write down). That is why mystics teach that all religions are branches of the same tree.

              For more on partnership and dominator behavior, and dominator roots in our cultures and religions, you can read Riane Eisler's books, The Chalice and The Blade, and The Partnership Paradigm.

              For a list of potential partners for almost any project of healing each other and our world, check out Wiser Earth <www.wiserearth.org>, which was inspired by the book Blessed Unrest, by Paul Hawkens.

              We need to combine our work in sustainable technologies with the indigenous cultures' lessons of cooperation and partnership with each other, and of stewardship with the rest of Life, in a context of spirituality, if we are to have any possibility of saving Life on Spaceship Earth from unimaginable, universal destruction, driven by human rapaciousness, selfishness, and fear, expressed as unbridled economic competition and as war.

              We are already on the path; let us be aware of its deeper meanings, contexts, and priorities. And from that study, let us transform human economic activity everywhere to working in harmony with the different nature in each place, and with each other, so we can practice and experience the great healing.

              Regards,

              Mark Roest

              On Wed, Aug 5, 2009 at 11:41 AM, Andrius Kulikauskas <ms@...> wrote:
               

              Ben,

              I share your account with Franz Nahrada and his Global Villages working
              group
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/globalvillages/
              I'm sad that you and Jeremy are leaving in such haste. I ask Marcin
              Jakubowski to reconsider that you might leave without needless hurt.
              I've been in your situation (kicked off a summer camp in Vis, Croatia)
              where, after pleading, I was granted to leave in the morning rather than
              the evening.

              I think that leading an on-the-ground community like Factor E Farm is
              enormously challenging and all kinds of slack might be given the
              leaders. Gandhi had his pesky sides, too. But can we find a way to
              acknowledge these misfortunes and learn from them? and evolve?

              Marcin's Open Source Ecology is positive in many important ways,
              including getting lots done, but also openly documenting failures along
              with successes. I note:
              and also I note Mathew Lippincott's "Why I'm not a true fan anymore"
              http://factorefarm.org/content/why-im-not-true-fan-anymore
              and Brittany Gill's "The Brick that Broke the Camel's Back"
              http://openfarmtech.org/weblog/?p=451

              Franz and I and Samwel Kongere are all inspired by Marcin's work. We're
              interested in developing our own on-the-ground communities. So I point
              to Factor E Farm as an ongoing "case study" to learn from: what to do,
              and what not to do, and hopefully, why.

              Marcin yesterday celebrated the 3rd anniversary of settling the land:
              http://openfarmtech.org/weblog/?p=971
              A lot achieved, especially in technological innovation. But not a
              single person mentioned or thanked.

              A future without people? Can we consider alternatives?

              Ben, Jeremy, please keep us posted on your future. Your dreams,
              endeavors, values, investigations and adventures.

              Ben, Jeremy, thank you for your help to link Minciu Sodas with Factor E
              Farm.

              Writing from the village of Dukiskes,

              Andrius

              Andrius Kulikauskas
              Minciu Sodas
              http://www.ms.lt
              ms@...
              +370 699 30003
              Dukiskes, Lithuania

              Ben de Vries wrote: "Fascist E Farm"
              > Well,
              >
              > I had hoped to be able to temper my report somewhat, but this latest
              > turn of events is really over the top.
              >
              > Marcin Jakubowski, and his guest of 3 days, Inga, who threatened me
              > with a stick yesterday over chores, have decided that it is expedient
              > to remove Jeremy and myself from factor e farm. The original
              > discussion 2 days ago was that we would have two weeks to make
              > arrangements. I was OK with this, seeing that my work was not
              > appreciated (30 hour weeks of mostly digging to plant), nor paid.
              > Jeremy was here 8 months, through the worst of winter, during the time
              > that Marcin threw out his girlfriend (71% owner of the land) because
              > she would not make more bricks. I think she would agree with me on
              > this. Jeremy was instrumental in that he provided the labor to build
              > the workshop.
              >
              > The pretext for todays accelerated action was that we "had sabotaged
              > the water system". This failure has happened before, and I think is
              > either part failure or design flaw. Like the burning of the bundestag,
              > it does however provide a convenient pretext to take action against
              > anyone who might disagree, or request review of any point. That would
              > be us. To me, this is evidence not of sabotage, but of delusional
              > paranoia, or the thought that was expressed that we "are a threat to
              > this project". I see the threat clearly: we would alert people who
              > might be fresh victims of his usership- he ate all our food, used our
              > labor, had no problem with me spending my money to improve the place,
              > used J to build his website, and pushed for more and more, without any
              > but the most forced expressions of thanks.
              >
              > The acceleration is from 2 weeks to 4 hours. We have been told to "get
              > out" under the threat of the sheriff doing so for us.
              >
              > Their admission is as follows: "This is a dictatorship".
              >
              > I could not have stated it more clearly. Just so you know what you're
              > in for if you want to visit, and just so you know what you are paying
              > for if you contribute. I am something of a student of intentional
              > communities, and particularly interested in why they fail. This is a
              > textbook case.
              >
              > My apologies to anyone who this does not concern.
              >
              > --
              > Ben de Vries
              > Certified Permaculture Designer
              >
              >
              >
              > NOTICE
              > This email and any attachments may contain confidential or legally
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              >
              > I find it rather easy to portray a businessman. Being bland, rather
              > cruel and incompetent comes naturally to me.
              > - John Cleese
              >
              > Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake: One of her characters asks, "As a
              > species we're doomed by hope, then?" By hope? Well, yes. Hope drives
              > us to invent new fixes for old messes, which in turn create ever more
              > dangerous messes. Hope elects the politician with the biggest empty
              > promise; and as any stockbroker or lottery seller knows, most of us
              > will take a slim hope over prudent and predictable frugality. Hope,
              > like greed, fuels the engine of capitalism.


            • Andrius Kulikauskas
              Hi Marcin and all, Franz Nahrada has collected links to letters and comments from himself, Michel Bauwens, Stefen Meretz, Vinay Gupta and others who are
              Message 6 of 10 , Aug 17, 2009
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                Hi Marcin and all,

                Franz Nahrada has collected links to letters and comments from himself,
                Michel Bauwens, Stefen Meretz, Vinay Gupta and others who are learning
                from recent events at Marcin Jakubowski's Factor E Farm where Ben and
                Jeremy were forced to leave on short notice.
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/globalvillages/message/4106
                I also share Mark Roest's letter below and Jeff Buderer, Benoit Couture
                and others have written at:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/globalvillages/

                I add my own personal reflections.
                * I think Marcin's approach is intrinsically competitive. He's
                interested in his own success, but not very interested in anybody else's
                success. He competes for donations, for people, for resources and
                especially, for attention in conceptual space, where I think scarcity
                economics is very intense. Conceptual space tends toward monopolies
                (like Google, Microsoft, YouTube, Twitter, etc...) And I think this
                competitiveness is more or less true of most online projects that I know
                of, including Oekonux, Keimform, P2P Foundation, Global Swadeshi, One
                Village. In that sense, I myself compete for Franz Nahrada's attention,
                for example. I think I'm competing successfully in that through Minciu
                Sodas I am organizing Worknets as a network of labs (mine, Samwel
                Kongere's, Franz's GIVE) and online groups (Franz's Global Villages,
                Janet Feldman's Holistic Helping, Samwel's Mendenyo, Pamela McLean's
                Learning From Each Other, Edward Cherlin's Earth Treasury and more)
                where there is a lot of energy shared in supporting each other's
                success. (And we're outliving highly touted efforts such as Doug
                Engelbart's Bootstrap Institute, Dee Hock's Chaordic Commons, MIT Media
                Lab's Think Cycle, Eric Eugene Kim's Blue Oxen, Pierre Omidyar's
                Omidyar.net) I think I (and we) are competing positively in that I
                (and we) are open to working with everybody toward a minimal culture for
                such shared energy, as I'm expressing with my draft of the Worknets
                Charter http://www.worknets.org/wiki.cgi?Charter which includes working
                in the Public Domain, helping people earn money but not charging people
                to care about them, and wanting all to succeed. My own conclusion after
                years of trying to engage other groups is that at this point we may well
                succeed around our own efforts to create a culture of independent
                thinkers. It seems that the more we succeed, the more others are
                inclined to join into our culture.
                * I think Marcin's commitment is very impressive and very rare. That's
                a key problem, that there aren't many alternative on-the-ground leaders
                in do-it-yourself open source global village technology. It's a reason
                to support Marcin and all such pioneers.
                * I suppose that it's nice to showcase all technology in a single
                village. But I think it's unreal, it's simplistic. Most of the world
                already has a built environment, infrastructure and technology that can
                be leveraged. I think it's counter to sustainability to abandon it. I
                agree that we do need a "do-it-yourself" approach to technology, but
                primarily on the level of skills and initiative, being able to do or
                organize one's own repairs, renovations, improvements. What I think
                will be real is a network of people with useful solutions. Ricardo has
                helped dozens of Africans get computers, get online, make the most of
                their technology, buy on eBay and trade locally. Zenonas Anusauskas (I
                live with his family) uses a simple furnace he invented for burning wet
                wood and household waste by which hot air dries the fuel before it is
                burned. The real "global village" technologies are I think the ones
                that help you remake your environment, not build from scratch. In that
                sense, even if Marcin was completely successful, his work may be mostly
                irrelevant, in that he's assuming that you'll start from scratch. But
                furthermore, his approach to his own land - such as where to build on it
                - seems haphazard, at odds with Christopher Alexander's "timeless way of
                building" where you feel through your surroundings, what's optimal for
                quality of life. I don't think that there's much notion of "quality of
                life" at Factor E Farm, and thus no way that the collection of tools
                that he builds are going to be valid for real world global villages.
                * I support an alternative approach that focuses on small projects (say,
                $100 each) such as Tom Ochuka's hand cart for water. We can learn
                something from each such project, build skills and get experience and
                share that. If we had hundreds of such projects, then we'd have
                something much more real than Factor E Farm. And they can benefit real
                people, as in Africa, rather than in a contrived situation, like Marcin's.
                * I support an alternative approach that focuses on the individual and
                their dreams - how to support them as a person who grows - rather than
                their projects, which may hinder their growth. If Marcin had said,
                "Help me live my dream life..." (rather than "the world needs my
                projects") then maybe he'd still be with Britanny and maybe his
                inventions would have some human context. I think it's a big mistake
                that he takes himself out of the picture, which is why I keep organizing
                around the deepest values of each individual. (Marcin's is "The freedom
                that technology gives you" which I think is helpful to know, where his
                leadership is relevant, and both his strong point and weak point.) We
                could have an "economy of dreams" but I don't know Marcin's personal
                dream. I ask us all to write about our dreams.
                * I support an alternative approach that builds on other people's
                efforts. Marcin started out on his own and I suppose that's what you
                have to do when you are a pioneer, and what I've done with Minciu
                Sodas. But most "global villagers" are going to be drawn into the
                movement and can add their energy to existing efforts. Franz Nahrada
                helped me see the relevance of the village. After the city displaced me
                from the Atzalynas community center, and then left it without any doors,
                I thought to myself, Who are the most inspiring villagers that I know
                of? Zenonas and Audrone agreed that I live with them and their
                delightful family. I'm able to boost Audrone's work to foster sobriety,
                Zenonas's Internet TV http://www.internettv.lt and get to know villagers
                at their church, at the sawmill in their back yard that supplies them
                with waste wood, or who supply us with milk because they keep their cows
                and horses in their barn, or who use the Internet access at four
                computers in the large room which is their bedroom at night. This is a
                real global village, a real example with real impact on real people.
                As I live here, people will get to know about it. I expect that Samwel
                and I and other Worknets lab leaders will have photo blogs that show
                people the on-the-ground activity. In 2003, I proposed to Marcin that
                he blog so that we might learn, as we are, from his real life rather
                than his crop yields. His blog is a great inspiration. I think from our
                blogs it will be clear what it means to be a global villager. I think
                that Zenonas and Audrone are much more relevant examples for the global
                villages movement than Factor E Farm, they are real leaders who care in
                real ways about real people, but they don't speak English. We can
                identify and organize around such leaders.
                * I support an alternative approach that focuses on the joy of a
                creative culture as the most relevant dimension of a global village.
                I'm building on Zenonas's Internet TV and home studio to make creative
                philosophical films and there's real interest from the art communities
                in Uzhupis, Smalininkai and other hubs that I think might each produce
                channels at his station. This creative activity is I think what's
                relevant for people to want to be together and live as community, fall
                in love and raise children.
                * Open source software is a poor model for a healthy economics, just as
                computers are a poor model for people. The software community consists,
                in my experience, of people whose social skills are less than average,
                as reflected in social software which most typically forces people to
                interact in very controlled ways. Software is really not that important
                in life, and what may work in organizing software projects (where maybe
                only 1% ever thrive), isn't relevant for on-the-ground problems as when
                people live together in an intentional community (which must address
                100% of issues).
                * I welcome Marcin's participation in Worknets - I'm glad for Ben and
                Jeremy's help to link us in our work together for Mornflake - but I
                don't expect that Marcin cares about my efforts or the Worknets initiative.
                * I prefer not to compete, but I am willing to compete. I choose to
                invest myself in those who want a shared culture (which I am pursuing as
                Worknets). I support Samwel Kongere's work on sustainability and I
                believe that in a year or two we might organize around him a lab with
                on-the-ground do-it-yourself technology that outshines Factor E Farm but
                also is a real base for real activity and a real example of global
                villages living.
                * I think that my approach will win for the following reasons:
                1) I will find a way for our network's participants to earn as much
                money as they need. I'm encouraged by our successes so far. If we're
                financially independent, then we can't be stopped.
                2) I will focus on the joy of encouraging each other's creative work.
                3) I will explore and support God's interests as an investigator in the
                variety of our values, questions, concerns, endeavors.
                4) I will encourage the growth of leaders of our culture and subcultures
                and be ever open to working with other groups.
                * I look forward to competing (and collaborating or not) and checking
                results in a year or two.

                I share Mark's letter below.

                Andrius Kulikauskas, Minciu Sodas, http://www.ms.lt, ms@...

                Mark Roest wrote:
                > Hello All (please post to groups Andrius included, which I am not a
                > member of yet),
                >
                > Here are some thoughts in response to Andrius' question, "But can we
                > find a way to
                > acknowledge these misfortunes and learn from them? and evolve?"
                >
                > One way we might learn is to understand that "western civilization"
                > was totally consumed by the dominator paradigm from a few thousand
                > years BC to the present, and that the only places where we can learn
                > what life /can/ be about are those people who are consciously
                > pioneering the partnership paradigm / gift economy / communitarianism
                > / mystical paths / new age / recreation of spiritual cultures /
                > connection with all our relations (the other animal and plant beings
                > with whom we share the planet) / deep science (from the latest physics
                > to ecology and ethology), and in or from those villages where
                > colonialism did not really intrude, and no one enslaved the people or
                > conquered them or settled in their territory in large numbers after
                > being displaced from their own homeland / ecosystem, and no major
                > natural or man-made disaster destroyed their ecosystem, and a
                > dominator class did not arise on its own.
                >
                > These are the places, along with looking deeply within our own hearts,
                > and looking at our children before they get spiritually defeated,
                > where we can find enlightened awareness of the oneness of all life,
                > indeed of all existence. We can also find it in many spiritual and
                > mystical teachers, which can include teachers of yoga and some of the
                > martial arts.
                >
                > We might also look at nature videos of chimpanzees working to balance
                > their social relations within their group, but killing male members of
                > groups on adjoining territories to access their females and food, and
                > male alpha baboons terrorizing all other members of their groups,
                > solely concerned with their dominance. We might read Jane Goodall's
                > book (I forget which one, but it was written within the last decade)
                > in which she describes what happened when the group of twelve she had
                > studied for many years, chronicling their care for each other and
                > acceptance of her as a close observer, split up, with five setting up
                > an adjoining and overlapping territory.
                >
                > She describes finding tracks, five times, that told the story of an
                > individual ambushed by a group and having its limbs twisted and
                > broken, attacked many ways, and being left maimed, dead or dying. She
                > tells of adolescent males getting very excited before leaving with the
                > older males on one of these hunts [this is just like young men
                > volunteering for war, and mobs getting worked up before a lynching].
                > She explains it as despeciation -- members of a group deciding that
                > others of the same family, or known territory-holders or strangers of
                > the same species, are 'not like us', not protected by a social code of
                > interdependence, and subject to being hunted like meat animals.
                >
                > Among humans, despeciation was strategically refined into class and
                > caste systems, and slavery. Instead of killing the 'other', dominate
                > and subjugate them, 'assert authority and dominion over them', and
                > exploit them for production of needed goods and symbols of power and
                > status for the dominators -- in fact, by their existence and
                > condition, they ARE symbols of power and status for the dominators.
                > But whenever we set off to war, or subjugate and imprison
                > minority-group males (as California does to such an extent that our
                > prisons have twice the number of inmates they were designed for), we
                > have plunged ourselves into the raw genetic depths of despeciation.
                >
                > Our entire culture is permeated by despeciation. I am old enough (62)
                > to have lived as a child in a highly segregated place before the civil
                > rights movement (Maryland, just outside of Washington, D.C.), where
                > blacks were forced to use separate, unmaintained drinking fountains,
                > parts of town, schools, etc., and forced to ride on the back of the
                > bus, and lynched for looking at a white woman with interest (and
                > anti-miscegnation laws were enforced and taught). Where the sheriff
                > dropped in on us after ten at night to sit down at our kitchen table,
                > tell my parents to sit down with him, and brag about catching a black
                > burglar in his kitchen and hitting him on the head with his gun so
                > hard he collected over a cup of blood from the floor -- while I
                > watched in hiding, from the bottom of the stairs. Where in my first
                > day at school, checking in at the principal's office, I saw two black
                > girls deliberately humiliated by making them go back to class, after
                > ten days at home getting rid of lice infestations, wearing large pink
                > bandages on their heads. Where days later a girl told me, "you can't
                > sit with us -- you don't have blue eyes," and when asked why that
                > mattered, said, "my parents told me I can't play with anyone who
                > doesn't have blue eyes." Where I watched two men on the bench in front
                > of a store bragging to each other about beating their wives 'to keep
                > them in line' -- just like baboons would do, if two alpha males met at
                > the bar to get drunk, and could talk about their lives.
                >
                > Now, a few days ago, I heard a right-wing demonstrator telling a
                > reporter for KPFA radio (94.1 FM) that there are 40 million people
                > without health insurance, and there aren't enough doctors to treat
                > those people without rationing care for those of us who have health
                > insurance, and doctors are telling their children to go into other
                > professions, so [essentially], we cannot change the system because
                > that would compromise the demonstrator's resources. This person was
                > knowingly saying that his well-being is predicated on consigning 40
                > million people to lives without health care, hence much suffering and
                > early deaths -- and the reporter did not even state that this is the
                > real meaning of the demonstrator's words! Despeciation is so pervasive
                > in our culture, and so dominant, that we do not even confront it
                > openly wherever we see it. I knew at the age of 5 that if I did so in
                > Maryland, I would be placing myself and my family in grave jeopardy.
                > Any adult male I saw could be a member of the Ku Klux Klan.
                >
                > Dominance in the sense of authority, as in the government, or the
                > captain of a ship, or "the king of my own castle", and the institution
                > of property, are variations of the dominator paradigm, and a system
                > for maintaining economic disparities. If you read an interview with
                > Rebecca Adamson, by Sarah van Gelder, on page 49 of the summer 2009
                > issue of yes! magazine (www.yesmagazine.org
                > <http://www.yesmagazine.org>), on Age-Old Wisdom for the New Economy,
                > you will find a systematic explanation of the philosophy of indigenous
                > cultures, with an example of how they teach /toddlers/ to go out to be
                > their own person, and come back to share. "Adamson, a Cherokee, is
                > founder of the First Nations Development Institute and First Peoples
                > Worldwide. She works globally with grassroots tribal communities, sits
                > on the boards of the Corporation for Enterprise Development and the
                > Calvert Social Investment Fund, and is an advisor to the United
                > Nations on rural development."
                >
                > We can understand the demonstrator above through Rebecca's words. "We
                > keep going into this paradigm of scarcity because fear is good for the
                > capitalistic system. If you want to drive consumption, you've got to
                > be fear based. But God is in the space and silence. That is where it's
                > sacred. You look up on a starry night, and you feel yourself unfold,
                > and that silence is where God is."
                >
                > Her juxtaposition goes to the root of humanity's development of
                > spiritual traditions. We all have chimpanzee and baboon behavior in
                > our genes. But we also have a wisdom and love that transcends the
                > dominator paradigm! Jane Goodall wrote that after seeing [the
                > genocide] unfold over a year and a half, she was unable to work for
                > over a year, until she read about a female chimpanzee in a London zoo.
                > This female would respond to two males starting to show signs of
                > conflict with each other by moving between them, and then going back
                > and forth between them, grooming each one and pulling it a bit back
                > toward the other one, until the males are standing on each side of
                > her, grooming her, [and the fight-or-flight response is washed away].
                >
                > So we have both dominator and partnership in our blood and genes and
                > minds. We have only to learn how and why to choose, and how to embed
                > partnership in our culture once more! A big hint: learn by doing. A
                > bigger lesson: this comes from the same place as the human experience
                > of spirituality, which opens us to the Ground of Being, where "no
                > matter what we say, All is One" (Annie Besant, an early leader of the
                > Theosophical Society, in a book whose title I did not write down).
                > That is why mystics teach that all religions are branches of the same
                > tree.
                >
                > For more on partnership and dominator behavior, and dominator roots in
                > our cultures and religions, you can read Riane Eisler's books, /The
                > Chalice and The Blade/, and /The Partnership Paradigm/.
                >
                > For a list of potential partners for almost any project of healing
                > each other and our world, check out Wiser Earth <www.wiserearth.org
                > <http://www.wiserearth.org>>, which was inspired by the book Blessed
                > Unrest, by Paul Hawkens.
                >
                > We need to combine our work in sustainable technologies with the
                > indigenous cultures' lessons of cooperation and partnership with each
                > other, and of stewardship with the rest of Life, in a context of
                > spirituality, if we are to have any possibility of saving Life on
                > Spaceship Earth from unimaginable, universal destruction, driven by
                > human rapaciousness, selfishness, and fear, expressed as unbridled
                > economic competition and as war.
                >
                > We are already on the path; let us be aware of its deeper meanings,
                > contexts, and priorities. And from that study, let us transform human
                > economic activity everywhere to working in harmony with the different
                > nature in each place, and with each other, so we can practice and
                > experience the great healing.
                >
                > Regards,
                >
                > Mark Roest
                >
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