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Re: [gismonyc] April meeting notes

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  • Dave Butler
    Charlie: Very informative article. We are a GIS consulting firm located in Troy, NY and are very interested to learn more about the West Nile Virus and how
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 13, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      Charlie:
      Very informative article.
      We are a GIS consulting firm located in Troy, NY and are very interested to
      learn more about the West Nile Virus and how NYCity is handeling it.
      Do you know if NYCity Department of Health has undertaken a West Nile
      Program using ESRI from California?

      David J. Butler
      President
      djbutler@...
      www.geodatalink.com
      Geographic Data Link, LLC
      Rensselaer Technology Park
      120 DeFreest Drive
      Troy, NY 12180-8360
      518-28304435
      518-283-0830 (fax)
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Ridgway, Charlie <charlie.ridgway@...>
      To: <gismonyc@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2001 1:06 PM
      Subject: [gismonyc] April meeting notes


      > It appears that you can only read the April notes I previously posted if
      you
      > are logged into Yahoo! Groups so I am reposting them as a list message.
      >
      >
      > The Use of GIS in Controlling the West Nile Virus in New York City.
      > presented by Mario Merlino
      > Office of Policy and Planning
      > NYC Department of Health.
      > Rather than reinventing the wheel the NYC Department of Health is using
      the
      > technique of using maps to combat contagions (in this case West Nile
      Virus)
      > as was pioneered during a previous epicemic of Cholera. But in the 21st
      > Century pen and paper has been traded in for hardware and software and the
      > maps are now produced on a GIS.
      > West Nile Virus became a real problem during the summer of 1999 when 62
      > people were diagnosed with the virus and seven of them died. During the
      > summer 2000 14 people were diagnosed with the disease and there was only
      one
      > death. It is estimated that only 1% of those exposed to the disease are
      > reported as confirmed cases of West Nile Virus.
      > West Nile Virus is known to be transmitted from animal vectors through
      > mosquitoes. When a mosquito bites an infected animal they withdraw the
      West
      > Nile Virus in the animal's blood. When they bite the next animal they
      > transmit the virus to that animal. If the next animal happens to be a
      human
      > that person becomes infected with the West Nile virus.
      > Symptoms of a mild West Nile virus infection in humans may include fever,
      > headache, and body aches, occasionally with skin rash and swollen lymph
      > glands. More severe infection may be marked by headache, high fever, neck
      > stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle
      > weakness, and paralysis. If untreated a West Nile infection can lead to
      > death. Early treatment is 100% effective in curing the disease.
      > Four Pronged Approach
      > To combat the problem the Department of Health took a four pronged
      approach:
      > public education, habitat reduction, larvacide and adulticide.
      > Public education about the disease and the way it is communicated to
      humans
      > is credited with part of the decrease in the number of cases from 1999 t0
      > 2000. People who are aware of the problem are better equipped to protect
      > themselves. They can also assist in reducing habitat and reporting
      problems
      > if they know what to look for.
      > Habitat reduction aims at reducing the number of places where mosquitoes
      can
      > breed. Typically this means reducing to the greatest extend possible,
      places
      > where there is standing water. Tire dumps are a favorite breeding ground
      for
      > mosquitoes. Other more friendly but potentially problematic breeding
      grounds
      > can include places like neglected swimming pools and flower vases in
      > cemeteries. In short, anywhere where there is stagnant water is a place
      > where mosquitoes can breed and deserves out attention.
      > Larvacide, the application of poisons to mosquito breeding grounds, is
      aimed
      > at killing mosquito larvae before they hatch and become a threat to the
      > population. During the 2000 breeding season all catch basins in NYC were
      > treated with larvacide four times.
      > Adulticide is used to kill those mosquitoes which do hatch. It involves
      > spraying an infected area with insecticides.
      > GIS Usage
      > Because the Department of Health did not have an in-house GIS capability
      > during the past seasons all work was contracted out. The Center for
      Analysis
      > and Research of Spatial Information (CARSI) at Hunter College handled most
      > of the analysis. Other city agencies also provided assistance.
      > Information about infection (mosquito trap data, dead bird reports, human
      > cases) were entered into a GIS and used in the decision making process
      prior
      > to spraying. The location of the incident was displayed and buffered.
      > Sensitive biological habitats (wetlands) around the location were
      displayed.
      > Previous spray areas were layered. From these a spray area which could be
      > easily communicated to the vendor was identified.
      > Maps of the spray area were prepared and used as a primary data sharing
      > vehicle since they so clearly represent the geospatial extent of the
      > activity. Maps were presented to the Commissioner who authorized each
      > spraying event. They were also forwarded electronically to the NYS
      > Department of Environmental Conservation who had to issue a permit before
      > the spraying could take place.
      > A map was then prepared for the daily 2:00 PM Mayor's press briefing.
      > Maptitude was used for this because it quickly and easily prepared
      > cartographically pleasing maps in poster size.
      > Maps were also added to the DOH Web site before each spraying.
      > Sampling A Problem
      > Things move around and can skew the data collected. Mosquitoes have a
      flight
      > range of about two miles. Birds may fly into the area from elsewhere and
      die
      > here or become infected while out foraging and die on returning to their
      > roost. Human cases were recorded based on the patient's home address but
      > there is no way of knowing if they were infected when they were bitten in
      > the back yard, at work in another borough, or vacationing in another
      state.
      > Field personnel were provided with handheld devices (Palm Pilots) to aid
      in
      > data collection and entry but the learning curve was too steep and they
      will
      > not be used in the future.
      > Modeling
      > CARSI is working to develop models to help in the coming year. They will
      use
      > GIS to help identify temporal and geospatial relationships that will
      provide
      > indicators for when adulticide is appropriate. These might include things
      > like the species of mosquitoes which are showing up infected in a trap at
      a
      > particular time and the availability of a food source for that specie. If
      > its normal food source is not available it may begin to bite humans and
      pose
      > more of a threat than if it's normal food source were present. This could
      > become a trigger for an adulticide campaign around that trap.
      > West Nile 2001
      > For the coming season the focus will be on larvacide.
      > A new web site will be unveiled shortly which will allow the public to
      > report instances of standing water or dead birds online. The site will
      > accept street address information and use it to geocode on the fly and
      > return a map of the location which the user can then click on to fine tune
      > the exact location they are reporting.
      > A private company will be contracted to provide quality control for the
      > primary spraying contractor. Automated Vehicle Tracking will be employed
      to
      > document areas that are being sprayed.
      >
      > In examining the sample spray area near JFK airport we learned that the
      > environmental regulations which are in place to protect some of the lower
      > species may by hampering our efforts to protect one of the higher
      species -
      > our own. Wetlands are heavily regulated and can not be sprayed, but these
      > are the very places which have the water that mosquito larvae need to
      > survive.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Charlie Ridgway
      > FEMA Region II
      > GIS Point of Contact
      > 26 Federal Plaza, Room 1307
      > New York, NY 10278
      > Lat: 40.715255 Lon: -074.004834
      > Voice: 212-225-7744
      > Fax: 212-225-7005
      > Email: charlie.ridgway@...
      > Atlas 2000: http://166.112.221.91/Atlas/ (intranet only)
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
      >
    • Mario Merlino
      Yes, we are using ESRI to build our WNV application. ... Charlie: Very informative article. We are a GIS consulting firm located in Troy, NY and are very
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 14, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        Yes, we are using ESRI to build our WNV application.

        >>> djbutler@... 06/13/01 09:38AM >>>
        Charlie:
        Very informative article.
        We are a GIS consulting firm located in Troy, NY and are very interested to
        learn more about the West Nile Virus and how NYCity is handeling it.
        Do you know if NYCity Department of Health has undertaken a West Nile
        Program using ESRI from California?

        David J. Butler
        President
        djbutler@...
        www.geodatalink.com
        Geographic Data Link, LLC
        Rensselaer Technology Park
        120 DeFreest Drive
        Troy, NY 12180-8360
        518-28304435
        518-283-0830 (fax)
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Ridgway, Charlie <charlie.ridgway@...>
        To: <gismonyc@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2001 1:06 PM
        Subject: [gismonyc] April meeting notes


        > It appears that you can only read the April notes I previously posted if
        you
        > are logged into Yahoo! Groups so I am reposting them as a list message.
        >
        >
        > The Use of GIS in Controlling the West Nile Virus in New York City.
        > presented by Mario Merlino
        > Office of Policy and Planning
        > NYC Department of Health.
        > Rather than reinventing the wheel the NYC Department of Health is using
        the
        > technique of using maps to combat contagions (in this case West Nile
        Virus)
        > as was pioneered during a previous epicemic of Cholera. But in the 21st
        > Century pen and paper has been traded in for hardware and software and the
        > maps are now produced on a GIS.
        > West Nile Virus became a real problem during the summer of 1999 when 62
        > people were diagnosed with the virus and seven of them died. During the
        > summer 2000 14 people were diagnosed with the disease and there was only
        one
        > death. It is estimated that only 1% of those exposed to the disease are
        > reported as confirmed cases of West Nile Virus.
        > West Nile Virus is known to be transmitted from animal vectors through
        > mosquitoes. When a mosquito bites an infected animal they withdraw the
        West
        > Nile Virus in the animal's blood. When they bite the next animal they
        > transmit the virus to that animal. If the next animal happens to be a
        human
        > that person becomes infected with the West Nile virus.
        > Symptoms of a mild West Nile virus infection in humans may include fever,
        > headache, and body aches, occasionally with skin rash and swollen lymph
        > glands. More severe infection may be marked by headache, high fever, neck
        > stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle
        > weakness, and paralysis. If untreated a West Nile infection can lead to
        > death. Early treatment is 100% effective in curing the disease.
        > Four Pronged Approach
        > To combat the problem the Department of Health took a four pronged
        approach:
        > public education, habitat reduction, larvacide and adulticide.
        > Public education about the disease and the way it is communicated to
        humans
        > is credited with part of the decrease in the number of cases from 1999 t0
        > 2000. People who are aware of the problem are better equipped to protect
        > themselves. They can also assist in reducing habitat and reporting
        problems
        > if they know what to look for.
        > Habitat reduction aims at reducing the number of places where mosquitoes
        can
        > breed. Typically this means reducing to the greatest extend possible,
        places
        > where there is standing water. Tire dumps are a favorite breeding ground
        for
        > mosquitoes. Other more friendly but potentially problematic breeding
        grounds
        > can include places like neglected swimming pools and flower vases in
        > cemeteries. In short, anywhere where there is stagnant water is a place
        > where mosquitoes can breed and deserves out attention.
        > Larvacide, the application of poisons to mosquito breeding grounds, is
        aimed
        > at killing mosquito larvae before they hatch and become a threat to the
        > population. During the 2000 breeding season all catch basins in NYC were
        > treated with larvacide four times.
        > Adulticide is used to kill those mosquitoes which do hatch. It involves
        > spraying an infected area with insecticides.
        > GIS Usage
        > Because the Department of Health did not have an in-house GIS capability
        > during the past seasons all work was contracted out. The Center for
        Analysis
        > and Research of Spatial Information (CARSI) at Hunter College handled most
        > of the analysis. Other city agencies also provided assistance.
        > Information about infection (mosquito trap data, dead bird reports, human
        > cases) were entered into a GIS and used in the decision making process
        prior
        > to spraying. The location of the incident was displayed and buffered.
        > Sensitive biological habitats (wetlands) around the location were
        displayed.
        > Previous spray areas were layered. From these a spray area which could be
        > easily communicated to the vendor was identified.
        > Maps of the spray area were prepared and used as a primary data sharing
        > vehicle since they so clearly represent the geospatial extent of the
        > activity. Maps were presented to the Commissioner who authorized each
        > spraying event. They were also forwarded electronically to the NYS
        > Department of Environmental Conservation who had to issue a permit before
        > the spraying could take place.
        > A map was then prepared for the daily 2:00 PM Mayor's press briefing.
        > Maptitude was used for this because it quickly and easily prepared
        > cartographically pleasing maps in poster size.
        > Maps were also added to the DOH Web site before each spraying.
        > Sampling A Problem
        > Things move around and can skew the data collected. Mosquitoes have a
        flight
        > range of about two miles. Birds may fly into the area from elsewhere and
        die
        > here or become infected while out foraging and die on returning to their
        > roost. Human cases were recorded based on the patient's home address but
        > there is no way of knowing if they were infected when they were bitten in
        > the back yard, at work in another borough, or vacationing in another
        state.
        > Field personnel were provided with handheld devices (Palm Pilots) to aid
        in
        > data collection and entry but the learning curve was too steep and they
        will
        > not be used in the future.
        > Modeling
        > CARSI is working to develop models to help in the coming year. They will
        use
        > GIS to help identify temporal and geospatial relationships that will
        provide
        > indicators for when adulticide is appropriate. These might include things
        > like the species of mosquitoes which are showing up infected in a trap at
        a
        > particular time and the availability of a food source for that specie. If
        > its normal food source is not available it may begin to bite humans and
        pose
        > more of a threat than if it's normal food source were present. This could
        > become a trigger for an adulticide campaign around that trap.
        > West Nile 2001
        > For the coming season the focus will be on larvacide.
        > A new web site will be unveiled shortly which will allow the public to
        > report instances of standing water or dead birds online. The site will
        > accept street address information and use it to geocode on the fly and
        > return a map of the location which the user can then click on to fine tune
        > the exact location they are reporting.
        > A private company will be contracted to provide quality control for the
        > primary spraying contractor. Automated Vehicle Tracking will be employed
        to
        > document areas that are being sprayed.
        >
        > In examining the sample spray area near JFK airport we learned that the
        > environmental regulations which are in place to protect some of the lower
        > species may by hampering our efforts to protect one of the higher
        species -
        > our own. Wetlands are heavily regulated and can not be sprayed, but these
        > are the very places which have the water that mosquito larvae need to
        > survive.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Charlie Ridgway
        > FEMA Region II
        > GIS Point of Contact
        > 26 Federal Plaza, Room 1307
        > New York, NY 10278
        > Lat: 40.715255 Lon: -074.004834
        > Voice: 212-225-7744
        > Fax: 212-225-7005
        > Email: charlie.ridgway@...
        > Atlas 2000: http://166.112.221.91/Atlas/ (intranet only)
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >




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