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Klaus' tale revisited.

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  • ravyng
    I suppose we all remember Klaus tale of the king, the witch and the prince, and that the story was in fact a subtle way for Klaus to tell Gil that he was
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 12, 2013
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      I suppose we all remember Klaus' tale of the king, the witch and the prince, and that the story was in fact a subtle way for Klaus to tell Gil that he was wasped. The most recent pages have started to make me think again. Obviously:
      The king in the tale who turns into a cursed wolf represents Klaus himself.
      The witch represents Lucrezia/the Other.
      And the prince represents Gil.

      One character in the story who *doesn't* have an obvious parallel is the giantess. I've seen some speculation that she represents von Pinn/Otilia. But I think the most recent page raises another possibility, which I won't name so I won't have to stuff this message with spoiler protection.

      An argument against this is if course that it would be hard for Klaus to predict this when he told the story.

      Yngvar
    • jsheikg
      ... I scratched my head on that one too, and came to the conclusion that the giantess was actually Castle Wulfenbach itself, with all its social structure, and
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 12, 2013
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        > One character in the story who *doesn't* have an obvious parallel is the giantess.

        I scratched my head on that one too, and came to the conclusion that the giantess was actually Castle Wulfenbach itself, with all its social structure, and not just von Pinn.
      • ravyng
        ... Maybe. I certainly saw Clemethious Heterodyne as a representation of an abstraction; the long war and the chaos that followed it, but I doubt that the
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 13, 2013
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          --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, "jsheikg" wrote:

          > > One character in the story who *doesn't* have an obvious parallel is the giantess.
          >
          > I scratched my head on that one too, and came to the conclusion that the giantess was actually Castle Wulfenbach itself, with all its social structure, and not just von Pinn.

          Maybe. I certainly saw Clemethious Heterodyne as a representation of an abstraction; the long war and the chaos that followed it, but I doubt that the giantess represents Castle Wulfenbach. The prince of the story went into hiding after his father was cursed, and with Klaus wasped, I'd think that the castle would be the *last* place for Gil to hide.

          But now I was reminded of the image of the prince (Gil) being carried off in a giant hand. :)

          I was also puzzled by the reference to "Gradok the Dour". It seemed to serve no purpose in the story.

          Yngvar
        • brendawriter
          ... Perhaps it is Agatha herself --a large authoritative figure who loves the Prince and can keep him safe in her own Castle until he is able to address the
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 13, 2013
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            --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, "jsheikg" wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > > One character in the story who *doesn't* have an obvious parallel is the giantess.
            >
            > I scratched my head on that one too, and came to the conclusion that the giantess was actually Castle Wulfenbach itself, with all its social structure, and not just von Pinn.
            >

            Perhaps it is Agatha herself --a large authoritative figure who loves the Prince and can keep him safe in her own Castle until he is able to address the wolf/witch situation. Furthermore, the giantess has a copper hairpin -- an electric metaphor. That she is depicted as not especially attractive, maternal rather than a wife, would just indicate that Klaus is not really serious about his son being ready to marry.

            Brenda
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