Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Yea! A story! -- Maybe Spoilers?

Expand Messages
  • kytross
    And so it begins. *potential spoiler* A giant wolf that shoots lightning from his mouth and the girl rides the back of the wolf. The wolf signifies Klaus
    Message 1 of 13 , May 9, 2011
      And so it begins.

      *potential spoiler*

















      A giant wolf that shoots lightning from his mouth and the girl rides the back of the wolf.

      The wolf signifies Klaus' family. And the similar sound to "Wolf-on-back." Though if I google searched as accurately as I hoped, Bach is German for stream or creek, rivulet, & other small waterways.

      Perhaps the Wolf will be restored near or by a brook that became the Wulfenbach ancestral home.


      --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, "kytross" <kytross@...> wrote:
      >
      > No, this is misinformation at its finest. Oh they'll be truth to it, the most subtle fictions always have truth in them. It may even be all true, but truths that will be useful to the Wulfenbachs. But this is Klaus protecting Gil, the empire, and all of Euroupa. I'll bet my future career as a writer that the story he tells to 'Phil' is one that will destroy the fairy-tale power base that Lucrezia and the Knights of Jove are using to solidify their hold on Europa, once 'Phil' starts to retell it. And I'll even put up a side bet that Bang didn't even know that this is what Klaus wanted all along and was acting cranky knowing they would bring in Phil.
      >
      > Then again I could be wrong. I was wrong once before.
      >
    • uncleop22
      ... The first thing I thought of was Jenka and Fust. ... Or by the River Dyne? Sounds like we re talking some old history here.
      Message 2 of 13 , May 9, 2011
        --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, "kytross" <kytross@...> wrote:
        > A giant wolf that shoots lightning from his mouth and the girl
        > rides the back of the wolf.

        The first thing I thought of was Jenka and Fust.

        > The wolf signifies Klaus' family. And the similar sound to
        > "Wolf-on-back." Though if I google searched as accurately as
        > I hoped, Bach is German for stream or creek, rivulet, & other
        > small waterways.
        >
        > Perhaps the Wolf will be restored near or by a brook that became
        > the Wulfenbach ancestral home.

        Or by the River Dyne? Sounds like we're talking some old history here.
      • Antje Bendrich
        Hallo kytross, ... You googled correctly :) Also, the similarity won t work if you pronounce Wulfenbach in German. That would sound more like Voolf nbuX ,
        Message 3 of 13 , May 9, 2011
          Hallo kytross,

          kytross schrieb am 09.05.2011 (09:57):

          > A giant wolf that shoots lightning from his mouth and the girl rides the back of the wolf.
          >
          > The wolf signifies Klaus' family. And the similar sound to "Wolf-on-back." Though if I google
          > searched as accurately as I hoped, Bach is German for stream or creek, rivulet, & other small
          > waterways.

          You googled correctly :)

          Also, the similarity won't work if you pronounce Wulfenbach in German.

          That would sound more like "Voolf'nbuX", where the oo in "Vool" is short like
          in "put" or "hook", and the u in buX sounds like "puppy" or "up".

          The X at the end is almost impossible for English speakers. Try saying "uck"
          but drifting into some exhaling snore instead ;) Oder just listen to the example at
          http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Bach. Now you also know how the pronounce the
          name of Johann Sebastian Bach. Handy, isn't it?

          Antje

          --
          Two things that are essential to life is WD 40 and duct tape. If it
          moves and it isn't supposed to use the duct tape. If it doesn't move
          and it's supposed to use the WD 40.
        • Joy Beeson
          ... Way back when, I was late for German class, ran across campus, ran up the steps, and reached my seat just as my name came up in the roll call. It s the
          Message 4 of 13 , May 9, 2011
            On 5/9/11 3:36 PM, Antje Bendrich wrote:

            > The X at the end is almost impossible for English
            > speakers.

            Way back when, I was late for German class, ran across
            campus, ran up the steps, and reached my seat just as my
            name came up in the roll call.

            It's the only time in my life that I ever pronounced "Ich
            bin hier" correctly.

            --
            Joy Beeson
            http://joybeeson.home.comcast.net/
            west of Fort Wayne, Indiana, U.S.A.
            where it's raining petals.
          • Joshua Kronengold
            ... Eh -- maybe for the goyim. Those of us who grew up learning to pronounce (if not understand) Hebrew can usually manage it, even if we are technically
            Message 5 of 13 , May 9, 2011
              Antje Bendrich writes:
              >The X at the end is almost impossible for English speakers. Try saying "uck"
              >but drifting into some exhaling snore instead ;)

              Eh -- maybe for the goyim. Those of us who grew up learning to
              pronounce (if not understand) Hebrew can usually manage it, even if we
              are technically monolingual. Roughly the same "Ch" as in "Chanuka",
              "Baruch" (blessed), and "Brucha" (blessing).

              --
              Joshua Kronengold (mneme@...) "Release the tera- |\ _,,,--,,_ ,)
              --^--port patents...and drop everything into the public /,`.-'`' -, ;-;;'
              /\\domain. OPEN SOURCE." "It's so scary when you say |,4- ) )-,_ ) /\
              /-\\\it like that" -- Howard Taylor (Schlock Mercenary) '---''(_/--' (_/-'
            • Antje Bendrich
              Hallo Joshua, ... Ah yes, these are far better examples of the sound! Antje -- Here is Edward Bear coming downstairs now, bump, bump, bump, on the back of his
              Message 6 of 13 , May 10, 2011
                Hallo Joshua,

                Joshua Kronengold schrieb am 09.05.2011 (16:24):
                > Antje Bendrich writes:
                > >The X at the end is almost impossible for English speakers. Try saying "uck"
                > >but drifting into some exhaling snore instead ;)
                >
                > Eh -- maybe for the goyim. Those of us who grew up learning to
                > pronounce (if not understand) Hebrew can usually manage it, even if we
                > are technically monolingual. Roughly the same "Ch" as in "Chanuka",
                > "Baruch" (blessed), and "Brucha" (blessing).

                Ah yes, these are far better examples of the sound!

                Antje

                --
                Here is Edward Bear coming downstairs now, bump, bump, bump, on the back of his
                head, behind Christopher Robin. It is, as far as he knows, the only way of
                coming downstairs, but sometimes he feels that there really is another way, if
                only he could stop bumping for a moment and think of it. And then he feels that
                perhaps there isn't. -- A.A. Milne: Winnie the Pooh
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.