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Power for the Future, or Dihoxulator?

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  • Richard Hoaglund
    http://www.blacklightpower.com/ Cerrberus
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 3, 2004
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    • pmaclanderson
      I quote from the site: a chemical process ( BlackLight Process ) which the Company believes causes the electrons of hydrogen atoms to drop to lower orbits,
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 4, 2004
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        I quote from the site:

        "a chemical process ("BlackLight Process") which the Company believes
        causes the electrons of hydrogen atoms to drop to lower orbits, thus
        releasing energy in excess of the energy required to start the
        process. The lower-energy atomic hydrogen product of the BlackLight
        Process reacts with an electron to form a hydride ion, which further
        reacts with elements other than hydrogen to form novel compounds
        called hydrino hydride compounds ("HHCs") which are proprietary to
        the Company."

        I think this passes dihoxulator and hits Dean Drive, myself.



        --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hoaglund
        <richard.hoaglund@v...> wrote:
        > http://www.blacklightpower.com/
        >
        > Cerrberus
      • David M. Hungerford III
        ... Waitaminute...it s been over a decade since my last chemistry class, but isn t the one electron a hydrogen atom can boast already *in* the lowest-possible
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 4, 2004
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          At 10:30 PM 10/4/2004, pmaclanderson wrote:

          >I quote from the site:
          >
          >"a chemical process ("BlackLight Process") which the Company believes
          >causes the electrons of hydrogen atoms to drop to lower orbits, [snip]

          Waitaminute...it's been over a decade since my last chemistry class, but
          isn't the one electron a hydrogen atom can boast already *in* the
          lowest-possible orbital?

          >I think this passes dihoxulator and hits Dean Drive, myself.

          Yep....


          David M. Hungerford III | Many succeed. Many just get to that
          morden@... | first syllable in the word "succeed."
          Insert virtual blue ribbon | --P.F. Bruns
          My opinions are mine and have nothing to do with my employer/ISP.
        • chembiogrrl
          ... More about hydrinos: http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~aaronson/doofusino.html http://www.phact.org/e/z/hydrino.htm I m not a physicist, but BlackLightPower
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 4, 2004
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            --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hoaglund <
            richard.hoaglund@v...> wrote:
            > http://www.blacklightpower.com/

            More about hydrinos:

            http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~aaronson/doofusino.html

            http://www.phact.org/e/z/hydrino.htm

            I'm not a physicist, but BlackLightPower looks more like snake oil than Mad
            Science to me.

            KH
          • Michael Telford
            ... Normally, yes. It s possible to induce that electron into a higher shell, but this is the perfect example of a metastable excited state and does not
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 4, 2004
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              On Oct 4, 2004, at 11:05 PM, David M. Hungerford III wrote:

              > At 10:30 PM 10/4/2004, pmaclanderson wrote:
              >
              > >I quote from the site:
              > >
              > >"a chemical process ("BlackLight Process") which the Company believes
              > >causes the electrons of hydrogen atoms to drop to lower orbits,
              > [snip]
              >
              > Waitaminute...it's been over a decade since my last chemistry class,
              > but
              > isn't the one electron a hydrogen atom can boast already *in* the
              > lowest-possible orbital?

              Normally, yes. It's possible to induce that electron into a higher
              shell, but this is the perfect example of a metastable excited state
              and does not produce energy. Note, however, that they do not say "a
              process which causes" but "a process which the Company believes
              causes." Clearly, they don't know exactly how their process works (I'm
              being generous and assuming that it does work), and are speculating.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Michael Telford
              ... I do like the K-Mart Test. It ties in nicely with my belief that a theory, however lovely, is ultimately meaningless if it never yields up an
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 4, 2004
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                On Oct 4, 2004, at 11:22 PM, chembiogrrl wrote:

                >
                > --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hoaglund <
                > richard.hoaglund@v...> wrote:
                > > http://www.blacklightpower.com/
                >
                > More about hydrinos:
                >
                > http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~aaronson/doofusino.html
                >
                > http://www.phact.org/e/z/hydrino.htm
                >
                > I'm not a physicist, but BlackLightPower looks more like snake oil
                > than Mad
                > Science to me.

                I do like the "K-Mart Test." It ties in nicely with my belief that a
                theory, however lovely, is ultimately meaningless if it never yields up
                an application.

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • mathomasarchitect
                ... a ... yields up ... And blacklightpower fails the K-Mart test, too, since the 1999 announcement of a revolution within the decade hasn t even produced
                Message 7 of 7 , Oct 5, 2004
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                  --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, Michael Telford <whitewings@s...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > >
                  > I do like the "K-Mart Test." It ties in nicely with my belief that
                  a
                  > theory, however lovely, is ultimately meaningless if it never
                  yields up
                  > an application.
                  >
                  >

                  And blacklightpower fails the K-Mart test, too, since the 1999
                  announcement of a revolution within the decade hasn't even produced
                  anything for sale at K-Mart as of 2004. Martha Stewart has had
                  better luck in the last five years.
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