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Book to Film [Was Re: [Girl Genius] Re: April 29 strip (spoilers?) ]

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  • Susan Fox
    Joseph Cotton opines, about transition from other media to feature films: Yeah, there is that! But sometimes you get lucky (The Princess Bride). That was not
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 30, 2009
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      Joseph Cotton opines, about transition from other media to feature films:

      "Yeah, there is that! But sometimes you get lucky (The Princess Bride)."

      That was not "Luck". That was someone having the good sense to get the
      novelist to write the screenplay as well. Fortunately, William Goldman
      had already proven his ability as a screenwriter, having turned out
      "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" amongst others. Rob Reiner must
      have loved the book very well and was determined to Do It Right.

      The Motion Picture Academy and the Writers Guild of America keep
      separate categories for screenplays adapted from other media, mostly
      prose, for a good reason. Maybe study up on How They Did It.

      As for GG specifically: I don't think I would trust anyone short of
      Studio Ghibli. Your thoughts?

      Cheers,
      Susan Fox
    • stereo_bis
      ... My thought is that there are other studios beside the big ones. See The triplets of Belleville for some independant work that gives plenty good results.
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 30, 2009
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        --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, Susan Fox <selene@...> wrote:
        >
        > As for GG specifically: I don't think I would trust anyone short of
        > Studio Ghibli. Your thoughts?
        >
        My thought is that there are other studios beside the big ones. See "The triplets of Belleville" for some independant work that gives plenty good results. Actually, I think that a minor studio would be more willing to adapt their style to the needs of the story than the big names.

        No way Disney, for example, could put Gantz right: neither is she "princess sized" (Agatha isn't either, BTW), nor is she a caricature of an obese women. And those are the two of the three main women category Disney has. (The third is the "ugly stepsister" category; "Lilo & Stitch" showing perhaps the only exceptions, where a girl can be plump without being round nor ugly.)

        Actually, all the main animation shops have their reputation and style, and thus will tend to stick to "tried-and-true" body shapes. And too often, sugar-coated designs: after all, animations are primarily for children, aren't they? :-/

        No, I'd rather go for an small indy studio: Stereo
      • Joseph Cotton
        ... Actually, that wasn t me, just someone replying to me -- but since my name is up there I ll respond. :-) I think there s a large contingent on the list
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 30, 2009
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          ----- Original Message ----
          > From: Susan Fox <selene@...>
          > Sent: Thursday, April 30, 2009 11:49:48 AM
          > Subject: Book to Film [Was Re: [Girl Genius] Re: April 29 strip (spoilers?) ]
          >
          > Joseph Cotton opines, about transition from other media to feature films:
          >
          > "Yeah, there is that! But sometimes you get lucky (The Princess Bride)."
          >
          > As for GG specifically:  I don't think I would trust anyone short of
          > Studio Ghibli.  Your thoughts?


          Actually, that wasn't me, just someone replying to me -- but since my name is up there I'll respond. :-)

          I think there's a large contingent on the list that would view a Studio Ghibli adaptation of GG as a sort of Holy Grail. And I agree it would undoubtedly be visually stunning if they did it. Fans of "Howl's Moving Castle" might not be as sanguine about how well they'd do in adapting the actual storyline, though. I've never read that book, so I don't know if it's really as badly mangled as people make it out to be. Some people have floated the idea of Pixar doing it, and that one I don't agree with at all. It would require a totally different "look" from what Pixar usually does.  Dreamworks (another suggestion from a listmember) I think could probably do well translating the look to the screen, but again we come back to what is to me the real problem, how well will the story survive.

          One of the things brought up in the film I mentioned, "The Making of Daniel Boone", is the problem of getting this month's wunkerkind director assigned to your project and having him decide that the whole thing needs to be redone from top to bottom so that it becomes one of "his" movies.  So even if you get a decent screenwriter, there's still the director trying to "improve" things; or the producers sticking their own oars into the waters and expecting to get their way because they're the ones holding the purse strings. In a perfect world, you get producers who fall in love with the source material and want to see something as close to that as possible translated to the screen, and they find a director that shares their love, rather than just seeing how many "big names" they can attach to the project in order to get funding and interest out of the studio.

           
          Joseph M. Cotton sylvaton@...


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        • Steven Rewa
          ... Lucky thing someone had the good sense, eh? -Steven Rewa
          Message 4 of 4 , May 1, 2009
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            --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, Susan Fox <selene@...> wrote:
            >
            > Joseph Cotton opines, about transition from other media to feature films:
            >
            > "Yeah, there is that! But sometimes you get lucky (The Princess Bride)."
            >
            > That was not "Luck". That was someone having the good sense to get the
            > novelist to write the screenplay as well.

            Lucky thing someone had the good sense, eh?

            -Steven Rewa
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