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A little Tryggvassen History

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  • Erin C.
    I m *sure* this has been posted before, since the name can t be a coincidence, but I thought that those of us new to the ML might appreciate a little Norwegian
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 25, 2007
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      I'm *sure* this has been posted before, since the name can't be a
      coincidence, but I thought that those of us new to the ML might
      appreciate a little Norwegian trivia:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olaf_Trygvasson

      Perhaps Othar has some distinguished ancestors eh? Admit it, like me,
      you thought "Tryggvassen" was such a weird name that it had to be made
      up. :)

      ern

      --
      "Cynic, n. A blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be."
      ~ Ambrose Bierce

      "Cynical is a word used by the frightened to describe the realistic."
      ~ Snog, Australian industrial rock band
    • muttley_the_snickering_hound
      All you can tell is that Othar s father was called Trygve, and that any children he has will be called Otharsson/Otharsdottar. The patronymic naming system
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 26, 2007
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        All you can tell is that Othar's father was called Trygve, and that
        any children he has will be called Otharsson/Otharsdottar. The
        patronymic naming system was prevelant until recently in the Nordic
        lands, and is still the norm in Iceland.
      • Erika Westberg
        On 8/26/07, muttley_the_snickering_hound ... If you can call about 100-150 years recently, then yes... but since early 1900 at least, there haven t been much
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 27, 2007
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          On 8/26/07, muttley_the_snickering_hound
          <alan@...-online.co.uk> wrote:

          > All you can tell is that Othar's father was called Trygve, and that
          > any children he has will be called Otharsson/Otharsdottar. The
          > patronymic naming system was prevelant until recently in the Nordic
          > lands, and is still the norm in Iceland.
          >

          If you can call about 100-150 years recently, then yes... but since
          early 1900 at least, there haven't been much of the Anders Larsson /
          Fredrik Andersson / Johan Fredriksson style of naming. If I'm not
          mistaken, which I very well might be.

          My mother does family research (geneology, right?) and got plenty
          bored with all the repetitive generations during the 17-1800. Jöns
          Nilsson, Nils Jönsson, Jöns Nilsson, Nils Jönsson... naming every son
          efter his grandfather, over and over again...

          /Erika
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