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Re: Miskatonic Library card (was: TPU logo)

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  • Jon Kelley
    Mongo like! If you decide to do the borrower cards as well, I d be interested. (More clutter for the pocket filing cabinet, but they re useful at times.
    Message 1 of 17 , Aug 1, 2007
      Mongo like!

      If you decide to do the "borrower cards" as well, I'd be interested. (More clutter for the pocket filing cabinet, but they're useful at times. Come out with a library card for a library no-where near here, for instance, and see what happens. Hell, I think I still have an old Purdue ID from 1987...)

      A side though - have you thought of doing a "backside" to those cards as well? You know - the grid without the top ID portion? I've got some parchment-coloured cardstock that would be just /perfect/ for these cards, and now I need to find some sticky pockets (or just come up with a layout and make some. Probably somewhere around 40-50# bond should do... Damn - don't get me started thinking again, or I'll have to SHOW YOU ALL!)


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    • William Jackson
      Posted by: Devi Batti-Loupstein chibiwakki@yahoo.ca chibiwakki Wed Aug 1, 2007 5:58 am (PST) Hey, you have a TPU student ID? I scanned and printed the one
      Message 2 of 17 , Aug 2, 2007
        Posted by: "Devi Batti-Loupstein" chibiwakki@...
        chibiwakki
        Wed Aug 1, 2007 5:58 am (PST)

        Hey, you have a TPU student ID?

        I scanned and printed the one off the cover of issue
        6. I do however, have my assigned classes for the fall
        2002 semester. My major is Ghost Light Engineering.
        Looks great with my Brotherhood of Bronze card...



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      • Mary Lowe-Hentges
        (More clutter for the pocket filing cabinet, but they re useful at times. Come out with a library card for a library no-where near here, for instance, and see
        Message 3 of 17 , Aug 2, 2007
          (More clutter for the pocket filing cabinet, but they're useful at times. Come out with a library card for a library no-where near here, for instance, and see what happens. Hell, I think I still have an old Purdue ID from 1987...)

          Heh, somewhere around here I still have my season pass from the 1982 World's Fair.


          Annechen Loewenstein
          non scripta non est



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        • wusemajor
          ... I tried to sign up for Transdimensional harmonics, but the building vanished.
          Message 4 of 17 , Aug 2, 2007
            --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, William Jackson <daglob@...> wrote:
            >
            > I scanned and printed the one off the cover of issue
            > 6. I do however, have my assigned classes for the fall
            > 2002 semester. My major is Ghost Light Engineering.
            > Looks great with my Brotherhood of Bronze card...

            I tried to sign up for Transdimensional harmonics, but the building
            vanished.
          • Martin J Hooper
            Just wondering where or which book Miskatonic University is in... ;)
            Message 5 of 17 , Aug 2, 2007
              Just wondering where or which book Miskatonic University is in... ;)
            • Susan/Selene
              ... Oh, you wanna keep that. You never know when it will come in handy. I knew an elderly news cameraman who got into the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics by
              Message 6 of 17 , Aug 2, 2007
                --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, Mary Lowe-Hentges <annechen67@...> wrote:

                > Heh, somewhere around here I still have my season pass from the 1982 World's Fair.

                Oh, you wanna keep that. You never know when it will come in handy. I knew an elderly
                news cameraman who got into the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics by presenting his 1932 Los
                Angeles Olympics. Nobody had the heart to turn him away! Wise old sensei, I miss him
                horribly. Photographic spark.

                Susan Fox
              • Darkheart29
                ... Are you kidding? Try H.P. Lovecraft s Cthuluh books. Old MU, where treatment for your insanity is part of the tuition...
                Message 7 of 17 , Aug 4, 2007
                  --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, Martin J Hooper <martinjh@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > Just wondering where or which book Miskatonic University is in... ;)

                  Are you kidding? Try H.P. Lovecraft's Cthuluh books. Old MU, where
                  treatment for your insanity is part of the tuition...
                • Martin J Hooper
                  ... Which ones would you recommend for a new reader?
                  Message 8 of 17 , Aug 4, 2007
                    Darkheart29 wrote:
                    > --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, Martin J Hooper <martinjh@...>
                    > wrote:
                    >> Just wondering where or which book Miskatonic University is in... ;)
                    >
                    > Are you kidding? Try H.P. Lovecraft's Cthuluh books. Old MU, where
                    > treatment for your insanity is part of the tuition...

                    Which ones would you recommend for a new reader?
                  • dragonland2001
                    ... Start with /Call of Cthulhu/ for the core of the mythos, and you can go outwards from there. Most of the Elder Gods have names that look like
                    Message 9 of 17 , Aug 4, 2007
                      --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, Martin J Hooper <martinjh@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Darkheart29 wrote:
                      > > --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, Martin J Hooper <martinjh@>
                      > > wrote:
                      > >> Just wondering where or which book Miskatonic University is in... ;)
                      > >
                      > > Are you kidding? Try H.P. Lovecraft's Cthuluh books. Old MU, where
                      > > treatment for your insanity is part of the tuition...
                      >
                      > Which ones would you recommend for a new reader?
                      >

                      Start with /Call of Cthulhu/ for the core of the mythos, and you can
                      go outwards from there. Most of the "Elder Gods" have names that look
                      like vaguely-pronounceable typographical errors (Cthulhu,
                      Nyarlathotep, &c.) so they're fairly easy to spot.

                      Also, a lot of his "dream sequence" stories (like /The Dream-Quest of
                      Unknown Kadath/) fall under the Cthulhu mythos, and so do other
                      stories - I'd probably look for a cross-reference once you get started
                      (my personal favourite is /At the Mountains of Madness/.)

                      Many consider Lovecraft the "progenitor" of the "supernatural horror"
                      genre - even his non-Cthulhu stories are excellent (/The Music of
                      Erich Zann/ comes to mind.) And, there were a few stories that were
                      tangential to the mythos that were also excellent (like /Pickman's
                      Model/.)

                      You should be able to find some collections of his as trade paperbacks
                      (I find them easier to handle than conventional paperbacks anyhow)
                      fairly easily...
                    • Erika Westberg
                      ... I realize the risk of saying this here, *prepares to dive for cover*, but I ve never managed to like Lovecraft s writing. I enjoy the world and the mythos
                      Message 10 of 17 , Aug 5, 2007
                        On 8/5/07, dragonland2001 <dragonland2001@...> wrote:
                        > Many consider Lovecraft the "progenitor" of the "supernatural horror"
                        > genre - even his non-Cthulhu stories are excellent (/The Music of
                        > Erich Zann/ comes to mind.) And, there were a few stories that were
                        > tangential to the mythos that were also excellent (like /Pickman's
                        > Model/.)
                        >

                        I realize the risk of saying this here, *prepares to dive for cover*, but
                        I've never managed to like Lovecraft's writing. I enjoy the world and the
                        mythos immensely, but with the exception of "Pickman's model" I think the
                        actual novels are sub par. Though that might be part due to the fact that I
                        read them for the first time in Swedish and when I was quite a bit younger
                        than now - 14 or 15, perhaps. I tried re-reading one novel in English a
                        while ago and it was better than I remembered.

                        However, even though it was better than I thought, that was mainly because I
                        found it to be lots of pretty words and a beautiful Victorian style, not
                        because it was actually an exiting read... and I don't get how some of my
                        friends actually got scared by the novels. I still think that it would be
                        interesting to see what Lovecraft's stories would look like if written by a
                        modern author. Maybe one that don't use the "And it was too horrible to
                        describe"-cop out all the time.

                        That being said, I'd still love a Miscatonic library card. The RPG built on
                        Chtuhlu is one of the best I've ever played. Lovecraft did have some great
                        ideas.

                        /Erika


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Adam Canning
                        ... written by a ... horrible to ... Ask and you shall recieve Charles The Atrocity Archives Stross s A Colder War
                        Message 11 of 17 , Aug 5, 2007
                          > 11d. Re: Miskatonic Library card (was: TPU logo)
                          > Posted by: "Erika Westberg" erika.westberg@... kapoofaren
                          > Date: Sun Aug 5, 2007 12:50 am ((PDT))
                          >
                          > I still think that it would be
                          > interesting to see what Lovecraft's stories would look like if
                          written by a
                          > modern author. Maybe one that don't use the "And it was too
                          horrible to
                          > describe"-cop out all the time.

                          Ask and you shall recieve
                          Charles "The Atrocity Archives" Stross's A Colder War

                          http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/stories/colderwar.htm

                          --
                          Adam Canning
                          "My fear is that since 9/11 we've been trapped in a novel Phil Dick
                          wrote to an outline by George Orwell." C Stross Science Fiction
                          Weekly Interview.
                        • Lizzie
                          ... Like them or not... I mean, like them or only sort of recognize them as cult/classic, folks familiar with Cthulhu might want to read _That Darn Squid God_,
                          Message 12 of 17 , Aug 5, 2007
                            >
                            >
                            > I realize the risk of saying this here, *prepares to dive for cover*, but
                            > I've never managed to like Lovecraft's writing. I enjoy the world and the
                            > mythos immensely, but with the exception of "Pickman's model" I think the
                            > actual novels are sub par. Though that might be part due to the fact that I
                            > read them for the first time in Swedish and when I was quite a bit younger
                            > than now - 14 or 15, perhaps. I tried re-reading one novel in English a
                            > while ago and it was better than I remembered.
                            >
                            > However, even though it was better than I thought, that was mainly because I
                            > found it to be lots of pretty words and a beautiful Victorian style, not
                            > because it was actually an exiting read... and I don't get how some of my
                            > friends actually got scared by the novels. I still think that it would be
                            > interesting to see what Lovecraft's stories would look like if written by a
                            > modern author. Maybe one that don't use the "And it was too horrible to
                            > describe"-cop out all the time.
                            >
                            > That being said, I'd still love a Miscatonic library card. The RPG built on
                            > Chtuhlu is one of the best I've ever played. Lovecraft did have some great
                            > ideas.
                            >
                            > /Erika
                            >
                            Like them or not... I mean, like them or only sort of recognize them as
                            cult/classic, folks familiar with Cthulhu might want to read _That Darn
                            Squid God_, which is on topic also because Phil Foglio had a hand in it
                            (I'm don't remember how but he did, and the search engines know it). My
                            copy is in screaming need of a good copyeditor, I have to think that it
                            was published by someone who doesn't speak English, but aside from that,
                            it gives a nod to so many period works, I believe including Allan
                            Quatermain, etc. You can view it on amazon.com but that's not where
                            you buy it. Sorry, not much help....!

                            http://www.amazon.com/That-Darn-Squid-Nick-Pollotta/dp/0809515512/ref=sr_1_1/105-4364384-2102829?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186313463&sr=8-1

                            *http://tinyurl.com/2sdljj

                            Lizzie
                            *
                            --

                            Elizabeth Apgar Triano

                            www.lizziewriter.com <http://www.lizziewriter.com/>

                            amor vincit omnia

                            www.danburymineralogicalsociety.org
                            <http://www.danburymineralogicalsociety.org/>
                          • William Jackson
                            Posted by: Erika Westberg erika.westberg@gmail.com kapoofaren Sun Aug 5, 2007 12:50 am (PST) However, even though it was better than I thought, that was
                            Message 13 of 17 , Aug 5, 2007
                              Posted by: "Erika Westberg" erika.westberg@...
                              kapoofaren
                              Sun Aug 5, 2007 12:50 am (PST)

                              ""However, even though it was better than I thought,
                              that was mainly because I
                              found it to be lots of pretty words and a beautiful
                              Victorian style, not
                              because it was actually an exiting read... and I don't
                              get how some of my
                              friends actually got scared by the novels. I still
                              think that it would be
                              interesting to see what Lovecraft's stories would look
                              like if written by a
                              modern author. Maybe one that don't use the "And it
                              was too horrible to
                              describe"-cop out all the time.""


                              I have friends that love (Love, LOVE) Lovecraft, and
                              others that loathe him. I feel that he was a talented
                              writer that never really achieved his full potential,
                              but did leave behind some good stories.
                              I remember that he was always saying that stuff was
                              "too horrible to describe", but upon re-reading The
                              Dunwich Horror", I discovered tha after stating that
                              Wilbur (or was it his brother?) was "too horrible
                              etc.", he then proceded to actually DESCRIBE him. I
                              can't get to most of my HPL books to re-readthe rest
                              of them, but ever since, I've been wondering if that
                              happens more often.


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                            • Alice Bentley
                              ... While I m not a fanatical Lovecraft fan, it s worth noting that his work is available in two slightly different editions. When originally published, his
                              Message 14 of 17 , Aug 5, 2007
                                William Jackson mentioned:
                                >I have friends that love (Love, LOVE) Lovecraft, and
                                >others that loathe him. I feel that he was a talented
                                >writer that never really achieved his full potential,
                                >but did leave behind some good stories.

                                While I'm not a fanatical Lovecraft fan, it's worth noting that his
                                work is available in two slightly different editions. When originally
                                published, his manuscripts were (sometime drastically) edited and
                                re-written by his magazine editor August Derleth. That's the version
                                you will find in the Del Rey collections.

                                Arkham House, a small press publisher started by August Derleth, and
                                dedicated to keeping Lovecraft's work in print, has versions taken
                                from the original manuscripts. The Dunwich Horror and Others ($27.95,
                                hardcover) has most of the favorite stories.

                                http://64.227.162.73/miva/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=arkhamhouse&Product_Code=0-87054-037-8

                                Alice
                              • vumbrahotmailcom
                                ... fact that I ... younger ... English a ... Off topic, but a fellow Swede that found Lovecraft at 15 (like I did) must be answered. I was entranced by many
                                Message 15 of 17 , Aug 5, 2007
                                  > actual novels are sub par. Though that might be part due to the
                                  fact that I
                                  > read them for the first time in Swedish and when I was quite a bit
                                  younger
                                  > than now - 14 or 15, perhaps. I tried re-reading one novel in
                                  English a
                                  > while ago and it was better than I remembered.


                                  Off topic, but a fellow Swede that found Lovecraft at 15 (like I did)
                                  must be answered. I was entranced by many of the short stories
                                  collected in Skr├Ąckens Labyrinter, but when I turned to the longer
                                  (Mountains of Madness, The Shadow out of Time) I found them a big
                                  yawn. Lovecraft's langauage can be very frustrating if you don't buy
                                  into the whole "unspeakable" part, which I did. His charachters are
                                  nobodies, victims, so if you want a real person to identify with,
                                  Lovecraft is not for you. But if you like his overuse of strange
                                  words, allusions and heaps of adjectives, his language can have a
                                  strong emotional impact. I don't think any of his followers have
                                  tried to emulate his style - but it would have been interesting to
                                  read if they did. What Lovecraft created, however, was immortal, a
                                  Mythos of alien, indifferent, churning (sorry) gods and monsters, a
                                  universe that can not be defeated or placated. There's no normality
                                  to defend against the monsters, this is their world, always was.

                                  There. Now I leave you to get chewed up by the other Lovecraftians.

                                  Torquemada
                                • David M. Hungerford III
                                  ... That...was deeply creepy. And very, very good. Thank you for the link. I think. Dav2.718
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Aug 5, 2007
                                    Adam Canning wrote:
                                    > Ask and you shall recieve
                                    > Charles "The Atrocity Archives" Stross's A Colder War
                                    >
                                    > http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/stories/colderwar.htm
                                    >
                                    >

                                    That...was deeply creepy. And very, very good.

                                    Thank you for the link. I think.

                                    Dav2.718
                                  • McClure, Kate (DEX-BLV)
                                    Stepping in late. Had an owie and was out yesterday. *der schnippe* I remember that he was always saying that stuff was too horrible to describe , but upon
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Aug 7, 2007
                                      Stepping in late. Had an owie and was out yesterday.

                                      *der schnippe*

                                      I remember that he was always saying that stuff was "too horrible to
                                      describe", but upon re-reading The Dunwich Horror", I discovered tha
                                      after stating that Wilbur (or was it his brother?) was "too horrible
                                      etc.", he then proceded to actually DESCRIBE him. I can't get to most of
                                      my HPL books to re-readthe rest of them, but ever since, I've been
                                      wondering if that happens more often.
                                      ---------------------------------

                                      One place to find out 'what happens' might be to look to Lovecraft's
                                      contemporaries. He and several other writers were friends, and would
                                      often riff on each other's latest books in writings of their own. A
                                      favorite ploy would be to take the surviving protagonist from one
                                      author's book, and lament that it was 'such a shame' what happened to
                                      that character in their own. This could be most annoying to the first
                                      author, especially if they had intended for that character to have
                                      further adventures.

                                      Not that web comic artists would *ever* do such a thing . . . ;)

                                      Kate McClure
                                      Cackle and the world cackles with you. Rant, and you rant alone.
                                      - M.E.
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