Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Advice for a costuming newbie.

Expand Messages
  • ubershrubby
    Hi. I m trying to put together a Girl Genius -themed costume for next Hallowe en - I m going as as madboy, I think - and I m having a bit of trouble working
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi.

      I'm trying to put together a "Girl Genius"-themed costume for next
      Hallowe'en - I'm going as as madboy, I think - and I'm having a bit of
      trouble working out the details. Primarily, it's a lack of
      terminology; I'm not sure what to *call* the styles and fashions that
      are displayed in the comic. The costuming places I've tried can't
      help me very much because I simply don't know the right words to
      describe what I'm looking for.

      Is anyone willing to give me a crash course in the clothing fashions
      of the "Girl Genius" world? ^^;

      Thanks,

      - David Prokopetz.
    • Margaret
      ... Good luck! ... The clothing I ve seen are primarily Victorian/Edwardian turned on it s side. Or maybe on it s head. For a start, take this Butterick
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        > I'm trying to put together a "Girl Genius"-themed costume for next
        > Hallowe'en - I'm going as as madboy, I think - and I'm having a bit of
        > trouble working out the details.

        Good luck!


        > Primarily, it's a lack of
        > terminology; I'm not sure what to *call* the styles and fashions that
        > are displayed in the comic. The costuming places I've tried can't
        > help me very much because I simply don't know the right words to
        > describe what I'm looking for.
        >

        The clothing I've seen are primarily Victorian/Edwardian turned on it's
        side. Or maybe on it's head. For a start, take this Butterick pattern:
        pattern:http://store.sewingtoday.com/cgi-bin/butterick/shop.cgi?s.item.B3721=x&TI=10013&page=7
        is a good place to start. Then you take a picture of what you think a
        Madboy would look like, and merge the two of them together.





        --
        Margaret

        “If you always do what interests you, at least one person is pleased.”
        —KATHERINE HEPBURN
      • everard_david
        ... Well, since a lot of this came from Foglio s imagination.... A lot of it would depend on your level of costuming. I mean mandboys are...madboys. Chaotic
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 1, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, "ubershrubby" <sirbob@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi.
          >
          > I'm trying to put together a "Girl Genius"-themed costume for next
          > Hallowe'en - I'm going as as madboy, I think - and I'm having a bit of
          > trouble working out the details. Primarily, it's a lack of
          > terminology; I'm not sure what to *call* the styles and fashions that
          > are displayed in the comic. The costuming places I've tried can't
          > help me very much because I simply don't know the right words to
          > describe what I'm looking for.
          >
          > Is anyone willing to give me a crash course in the clothing fashions
          > of the "Girl Genius" world? ^^;
          >
          > Thanks,
          >
          > - David Prokopetz.

          Well, since a lot of this came from Foglio's imagination....

          A lot of it would depend on your level of costuming. I mean mandboys
          are...madboys. Chaotic creativism is a trademark. Take a look at
          Wulfenbach's students and the Transylvania Polygnostic University
          pages - their clothes varied from the practicle to the ... well silly.
          Lots of regional influences warring with the practical. Base of the
          fashion I would say is Victorian

          Examples - Dr Merlot and Glassvich. Victorian wear with a short apron
          and a lab coat with oversized lapels over that (can you say - hope
          it's cold where you are?). This can be done from commercial costume
          patterns.

          If you're just gonna go for you own "madboy look", well...add a lot of
          pockets, funny shaped tools, bits of wiring and funky looking
          electro-mechanical stuff, big shiney buttons, broach closing the
          collar - instant madboy.

          If you're looking for more formal wear - add a jacket/trench with
          oversized lapels stiffened with heavy interface. If you're looking for
          a more "noble house" look, add a heraldic icon (i.e. like the
          Wulfenbach winged tower or the Heterdyne winged trillobyte).

          Most importantly, give us an idea of what your costuming skills and
          resources are. From there we can provide more specific ideas.

          Hyu forgot dot he haz to haf a hat!
        • ubershrubby
          ... The sky s the limit, pretty much. If I can t do it myself, I know someone who can - it s one of the benefits of hanging out with a bunch of artsy-craftsy
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 1, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, "everard_david" <dsanda68@...> wrote:
            >
            > Most importantly, give us an idea of what your costuming skills and
            > resources are. From there we can provide more specific ideas.
            >

            The sky's the limit, pretty much. If I can't do it myself, I know
            someone who can - it's one of the benefits of hanging out with a bunch
            of artsy-craftsy geeks. ;)

            Like I mentioned earlier, it's mostly a problem of knowing what I'm
            talking about, and being able to talk about it in such a way that the
            folks I'm working with can understand me. F'rex, when you were
            talking about a coat's "interface" in your post? I hadn't a clue what
            you were referring to - I'd never heard the word in the context of
            clothing/costuming before. I had to go look it up. ^^;

            I wonder... a couple of folks have pointed out that the predominant
            influence is late Victorian (I never would have been able to identify
            that on my own) - can anyone recommend a website (or, better yet, a
            published book) that gives a good overview of late Victorian fashion?

            (I've tried Googling it myself, but Google isn't much help when you
            don't know what terms to search for in the first place. =( )

            Thanks,

            - Dave.
          • Candi Cabaniss
            Well first....goggles. you can either help the creators and buy theirs (which we did a while back) or you can try http://www.brassgoggles.co.uk/brassgoggles/
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 1, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              Well first....goggles.

              you can either help the creators and buy theirs (which we did a while back)
              or you can try http://www.brassgoggles.co.uk/brassgoggles/ for their
              tutorial.

              Me? ...I'd sketch out something I'd like...point "there that one right
              there in red"

              you might try looking at http://www.risingsun.net, its a costume site,
              mostly anime but the style in many cases is similar.

              Me? I've got a folkwear belgian cook pattern and time for the beginning,
              frock coats are a good idea.

              Go to fabric stores, they have realized that the costume people are a niche
              and they have many. Especially now since many Hancocks are closing and
              there is a beginning 30 percent off sale.

              Candi Cabaniss


              -----Original Message-----
              From: girlgenius@yahoogroups.com [mailto:girlgenius@yahoogroups.com]On
              Behalf Of ubershrubby
              Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 6:15 PM
              To: girlgenius@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [Girl Genius] Re: Advice for a costuming newbie.


              --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, "everard_david" <dsanda68@...> wrote:
              >
              > Most importantly, give us an idea of what your costuming skills and
              > resources are. From there we can provide more specific ideas.
              >

              The sky's the limit, pretty much. If I can't do it myself, I know
              someone who can - it's one of the benefits of hanging out with a bunch
              of artsy-craftsy geeks. ;)

              Like I mentioned earlier, it's mostly a problem of knowing what I'm
              talking about, and being able to talk about it in such a way that the
              folks I'm working with can understand me. F'rex, when you were
              talking about a coat's "interface" in your post? I hadn't a clue what
              you were referring to - I'd never heard the word in the context of
              clothing/costuming before. I had to go look it up. ^^;

              I wonder... a couple of folks have pointed out that the predominant
              influence is late Victorian (I never would have been able to identify
              that on my own) - can anyone recommend a website (or, better yet, a
              published book) that gives a good overview of late Victorian fashion?

              (I've tried Googling it myself, but Google isn't much help when you
              don't know what terms to search for in the first place. =( )

              Thanks,

              - Dave.




              --
              No virus found in this outgoing message.
              Checked by AVG Free Edition.
              Version: 7.5.446 / Virus Database: 268.18.24/741 - Release Date: 3/31/2007
              8:54 PM


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Margaret
              ... If you can show a picture or photograph to most costumers, they can tell you what you re looking at. I ve made many costumes from a picture in a comic
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 1, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                > Like I mentioned earlier, it's mostly a problem of knowing what I'm
                > talking about, and being able to talk about it in such a way that the
                > folks I'm working with can understand me. F'rex, when you were
                > talking about a coat's "interface" in your post? I hadn't a clue what
                > you were referring to - I'd never heard the word in the context of
                > clothing/costuming before. I had to go look it up. ^^;
                >


                If you can show a picture or photograph to most costumers, they can tell
                you what you're looking at. I've made many costumes from a picture in a
                comic book, but I need that picture! So if you show your artsie-craftsie
                friends, oh, let's say Theo (or any of the other students)
                http://www.girlgeniusonline.com/cgi-bin/gg101.cgi?date=20051118 I would
                be able to make that outfit. But you are right, you need to know how to
                describe it.



                > I wonder... a couple of folks have pointed out that the predominant
                > influence is late Victorian (I never would have been able to identify
                > that on my own) - can anyone recommend a website (or, better yet, a
                > published book) that gives a good overview of late Victorian fashion?
                >

                Try the Costumer's Manifesto --
                http://www.costumes.org/history/100pages/victlinks.htm#General

                --
                Margaret

                “If you always do what interests you, at least one person is pleased.”
                —KATHERINE HEPBURN
              • everard_david
                ... Oh, then that s easy. Print out pages of the comic with pieces you like as show them to your artsy friends. I like the jacket in this pic, and the pants
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 1, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, "ubershrubby" <sirbob@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, "everard_david" <dsanda68@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Most importantly, give us an idea of what your costuming skills and
                  > > resources are. From there we can provide more specific ideas.
                  > >
                  >
                  > The sky's the limit, pretty much. If I can't do it myself, I know
                  > someone who can - it's one of the benefits of hanging out with a bunch
                  > of artsy-craftsy geeks. ;)
                  >
                  > Like I mentioned earlier, it's mostly a problem of knowing what I'm
                  > talking about, and being able to talk about it in such a way that the
                  > folks I'm working with can understand me. F'rex, when you were
                  > talking about a coat's "interface" in your post? I hadn't a clue what
                  > you were referring to - I'd never heard the word in the context of
                  > clothing/costuming before. I had to go look it up. ^^;
                  >
                  > I wonder... a couple of folks have pointed out that the predominant
                  > influence is late Victorian (I never would have been able to identify
                  > that on my own) - can anyone recommend a website (or, better yet, a
                  > published book) that gives a good overview of late Victorian fashion?
                  >
                  > (I've tried Googling it myself, but Google isn't much help when you
                  > don't know what terms to search for in the first place. =( )
                  >
                  > Thanks,
                  >
                  > - Dave.
                  >
                  Oh, then that's easy. Print out pages of the comic with pieces you
                  like as show them to your artsy friends. "I like the jacket in this
                  pic, and the pants on Othar here are cool, etc". And they should know
                  tricks like interfacing. BTW, interfacing is a layer sandwiched
                  between the liner and the outside of the clothing to add stiffining to
                  the clothing. Use the heavy stuff and the clothing will almost stand
                  upby itself which is the look of a lot of the jackets Foglio draws. It
                  is also usually made from artificial fibers and adds a LOT of
                  insulation to the costume, meaning if you're going to be somewhere
                  warm, it is NOT going to be your friend. If you're going to be
                  somewhere cold, then you can just smile smugly while everyone else
                  freezes their tushie off.

                  Keep in mind you are going to be wearing this for an extended period
                  of time. If you are going to be in a climate controlled area, use
                  natural fibers that breathe, such as cotton. Think about what you are
                  going to be doing in the costume. I mean, no matter how good you look,
                  it's going to get really old really quickly if everyone is dancing and
                  you can't.

                  And as for a madboy look - well the most convincing part of the
                  costume would be the maniacal grin. Gotta perfect the face that says
                  "I can do anything and I'm crazy enough to TRY". Then you can run
                  around in Victorian underwear and be convincing. Seriously, they are
                  too focused on the Spark to have a unified look. Take pieces that you
                  like and mix and match. I mean, Othar just runs around in pants, a
                  sweater, and cool goggles. (Put a bolwer hat on him and you've got
                  Phil on steroids). On the other end of the spectrum, you've got Gil
                  who has tailored and embroidered full formal outfits.

                  And de hat! Hyu keep forgettin de hat!

                  *sigh* Good help is SO hard to find!

                  David Sandman
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.