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Re: [Girl Genius] Re: Internet?

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  • Michael Brazier
    ... Could be. But Agatha and her friends were in a Wulfenbach airship at the end of Volume 6, and Sturmhalten wasn t pacified yet. They ought to have outrun
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 1, 2007
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      quisquared wrote:
      > It only takes one courier or trader with a fast (or
      > steam-spring-assisted) horse to start a whole flock of rumors, after
      > all... these could easily all be garbled versions of just one or two
      > reports, I suspect.

      Could be. But Agatha and her friends were in a Wulfenbach airship at
      the end of Volume 6, and Sturmhalten wasn't pacified yet. They ought to
      have outrun the report of Agatha's disclosure. If we're seeing
      Mechanicsburg, either Agatha went somewhere else, or she's already there
      and in hiding ...

      Michael Brazier
    • Euel Ball
      ... To quote Mark Twain, Dame Rumor travels around the world while the Truth is putting on her boots. That was then, now Rumor circles the Earth seven times
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 1, 2007
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        --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, Margaret <mamarose127@...> wrote:

        > > For a place that doesn't seem to have radios, televisions or, to the
        > > best of my recollection, telephones, news sure does seem to travel
        > > fast. What am I missing?
        >
        > Gossip. When all you have to do is talk, gossip spreads faster than
        > the speed of light.

        To quote Mark Twain, "Dame Rumor travels around the world while the
        Truth is putting on her boots." That was then, now Rumor circles the
        Earth seven times (with a stop for an espresso) as Truth reaches fot
        the snooze button on her alarm clock.

        Euel
      • teratologicalmarty
        Given the tech level we ve seen, telegraphs are perfectly possible, as are giant semaphores not unlike those seen in Discworld and/or genetically-modified
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 2, 2007
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          Given the tech level we've seen, telegraphs are perfectly possible, as
          are giant semaphores not unlike those seen in Discworld and/or
          genetically-modified supercarrier pigeons. Also, airships can make
          quite good time, and they've clearly dropped off some gossipy soldiers.
        • jsheikg
          ... In fact the telegraph is so simple it would be hard *not* to invent. It would qualify, like the steam tractors, as non-Spark technology. It is also
          Message 4 of 13 , Mar 3, 2007
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            > Given the tech level we've seen, telegraphs are perfectly possible,
            <snip>

            In fact the telegraph is so simple it would be hard *not* to invent.
            It would qualify, like the steam tractors, as non-Spark technology.
            It is also quite robust.

            So we actually need a reason for the telegraph *not* to exist.

            Given the minmoths as an example, there may be some artificial life
            form with an appetite for wire that has "naturalized" and makes wire
            communications next to impossible. Such a creation could easily have
            been produced during the Spark vs Spark Long War to deal with Sparks
            that relied on such communications.

            Heck, it might *be* the minmoths. Those tusks could be effective wire
            cutters. More likely though, it's something that can burrow or fly
            (or both).
          • chembiogrrl
            ... Funny you should mention that, given today s 101 page: http://www.girlgeniusonline.com/cgi-bin/gg101.cgi?date=20070302 Putting up telegraph wires through
            Message 5 of 13 , Mar 4, 2007
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              --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, "jsheikg" <jsheikg@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > > Given the tech level we've seen, telegraphs are perfectly possible,
              > <snip>
              >
              > In fact the telegraph is so simple it would be hard *not* to invent.
              > It would qualify, like the steam tractors, as non-Spark technology.
              > It is also quite robust.
              >
              > So we actually need a reason for the telegraph *not* to exist.
              >
              Funny you should mention that, given today's 101 page:

              http://www.girlgeniusonline.com/cgi-bin/gg101.cgi?date=20070302

              Putting up telegraph wires through the Wastelands just isn't feasible.
              My impression is that most of Europa is Wasteland, dotted with
              villages, towns, and cities. If some Spark was sufficiently determined
              to defend a telegraph installation crew, some monster would probably
              blunder along and knock down a pole or break the wire. Sure, my county
              loses its fiber-optic line to the outside world for a day or two every
              month or so, but our repairmen have a much safer job. Bears, mountain
              lions, and sasquatches aren't nearly as deadly as the Monster Horse or
              the crab-clank that fried Olga.

              --Kathryn
            • Brendan
              ... Well, that s a good counter for the electronic telegraph, but if a spark were determine enough, there s always the Mechanical Telegraph to use. Basicly
              Message 6 of 13 , Mar 5, 2007
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                --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, "chembiogrrl" <khedges1@...> wrote:
                >
                > --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, "jsheikg" <jsheikg@> wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > > > Given the tech level we've seen, telegraphs are perfectly possible,
                > > <snip>
                > >
                > > In fact the telegraph is so simple it would be hard *not* to invent.
                > > It would qualify, like the steam tractors, as non-Spark technology.
                > > It is also quite robust.
                > >
                > > So we actually need a reason for the telegraph *not* to exist.
                > >
                > Funny you should mention that, given today's 101 page:
                >
                > http://www.girlgeniusonline.com/cgi-bin/gg101.cgi?date=20070302
                >
                > Putting up telegraph wires through the Wastelands just isn't feasible.
                > My impression is that most of Europa is Wasteland, dotted with
                > villages, towns, and cities. If some Spark was sufficiently determined
                > to defend a telegraph installation crew, some monster would probably
                > blunder along and knock down a pole or break the wire. Sure, my county
                > loses its fiber-optic line to the outside world for a day or two every
                > month or so, but our repairmen have a much safer job. Bears, mountain
                > lions, and sasquatches aren't nearly as deadly as the Monster Horse or
                > the crab-clank that fried Olga.
                >
                > --Kathryn
                >
                Well, that's a good counter for the electronic telegraph, but if a
                spark were determine enough, there's always the Mechanical Telegraph
                to use. Basicly the Mechanical telegraph was built using a series of
                towers situated in high places and outfitted with a collection of
                large armitures. Each had lookouts situated watching the next tower
                in line, and when the armitures were changed, they had their own tower
                change it's own to match. Properly manned and maintained, they could
                convey information fairly rapidly across france. Here's
                a link
                http://people.deas.harvard.edu/~jones/cscie129/images/history/chappe.html
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