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[Girl Genius] Re: Where's GG 10! Where's GG 10! Where GG 10! Where's GG 10!

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  • Bill Jackson
    ... and ... between the ... shared ... the old ... think just ... believe. ... Ah, but the legends are still there, still in the public conciousness. How many
    Message 1 of 13 , Oct 1, 2003
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      --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, Damien Sullivan <phoenix@U...>
      wrote:
      > On Tue, Sep 30, 2003 at 02:17:27PM -0000, Bill Jackson wrote:
      >
      > Not really. The speculation was about how much religion is extant
      and
      > relevant "now". Assuming divergence from our history sometime
      between the
      > Renaissance and the Industral Revolution then I think we can assume
      shared
      > history and religion before then, which includes easy access to all
      the old
      > religion references. That they picked such names for themselves I
      think just
      > tells us that they knew of the old legend, not what they might
      believe.
      >
      > -xx- Damien X-)

      Ah, but the legends are still there, still in the public
      conciousness. How many Babylonian folk tales can you remember, off
      the top of your head? If it's one, you've got me beat.
      The line about them being Jewish is a very, very, very old joke, and
      you not realizing that it was a joke makes me feel very, very, very
      old.

      Bill, who's not 50 yet (but I can see it from where I'm standing)
    • Damien Sullivan
      ... Gilgamesh. Oh, I guess that s Sumerian, even older than Babylonian. More recently I know Romulus and Remus, and the sacred geese of the Capitoline, and
      Message 2 of 13 , Oct 1, 2003
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        On Wed, Oct 01, 2003 at 12:00:39PM -0000, Bill Jackson wrote:

        > conciousness. How many Babylonian folk tales can you remember, off
        > the top of your head? If it's one, you've got me beat.

        Gilgamesh. Oh, I guess that's Sumerian, even older than Babylonian.

        More "recently" I know Romulus and Remus, and the sacred geese of the
        Capitoline, and the rape which brought down the last Roman king, not to
        mention all the standard Greek myths and legends. The golden shower which
        begat Perseus, and what he did, and where the Gorgons came from in the first
        place. The Golden Fleece, the Trojan War, Theseus and Ariadne, Athena and
        Arachne, etc. etc. Plus some Norse and Irish myths and legends. And I'm not
        that unusual.

        Given that *if* GG religion has faded from most people if would have done so
        probably in the "last few" centuries, I'd expect Biblical motifs to still be
        rather current. All the more so as I expect the common people are still
        pretty religious; it's the Sparks and those in their orbit who might view
        religious promises of an afterlife as quaint and redundant.

        Mind you, "Lilith" is a bit odd to me; I know her legend mostly from
        _Sandman_. On the other hand, she might have been more common currency back
        when people believed more in demons for her to be the mother of.

        > The line about them being Jewish is a very, very, very old joke, and
        > you not realizing that it was a joke makes me feel very, very, very
        > old.

        *shrug* I know they're Jewish names, but joke?

        -xx- Damien X-)
      • Debbie
        ... Uh, um uh ... Gilgamesh? Enlil? Marduck? Tiamat? Ishtar? Tammuz? Astarte? Inanna? Sacred pillars and date palms? Those funky birds that were the
        Message 3 of 13 , Oct 1, 2003
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          > Ah, but the legends are still there, still in the public
          > conciousness. How many Babylonian folk tales can you remember, off
          > the top of your head? If it's one, you've got me beat.

          > Bill, who's not 50 yet (but I can see it from where I'm standing)

          Uh, um uh ... Gilgamesh?

          Enlil? Marduck? Tiamat? Ishtar? Tammuz? Astarte? Inanna? Sacred pillars and date palms? Those funky birds that were the proto-griffins? Isis and the tree-coffin? And that's just off the top of my head.

          Folks, religion doesn't die. It evolves and mutates, but it never goes away completely. Whoever named Adam and Lilith was familiar enough with Judaism to know their folk tales. Doubtless the majority of people in this universe have some religious framework within which to frame their spiritual questions about their place in the universe, although what form it takes is still up in the air. I've personally seen the little sub-branch of Protestant Christianity I grew up in mutate from the second most liberal faith in America to the forefront of fundamentalist conservatism. No mutation of religion surprises me anymore.

          Debbie
          lay leader of Slag-Bla - er, the UUA
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