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Digest #473

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  • M. Alan Thomas II
    ... --Yay! Glen Cook! I live a couple of blocks from him. Both he and his family are nice people. He s not that well known, so I m always happy to run
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 4, 2003
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      "Bill Jackson" wrote:

      >. . . or Glen Cook publish a new novel . . .

      --Yay! Glen Cook! I live a couple of blocks from him. Both he and
      his family are nice people. He's not that well known, so I'm always
      happy to run across another fan. One of these days I'm going to
      have to buy my own collection of his stuff and have him sign all of
      it.


      "Adam Canning" wrote:

      >No one was surprised that the Dihoxulator was given to a pair of
      non sparks to assemble.

      --Yes, but they were extremely intelligent non-sparks with a spark-
      class laboratory.


      Damien Sullivan wrote:

      [In reference to Von Zinzer and his gunboat's repairs]
      >Him and his crew, but yeah.

      --Actually, I was thinking that each member did something
      different: Fire control, helm, communications, command,
      engineering, or whatever. Von Zinzer was clearly attempting to pull
      rank on Omar when he says "You're out of line, Sergeant." If you
      will look at their coat collars, Von Zinzer has three bars of rank
      to Omar's two. I suspect that Von Zinzer was the engineer and
      ranked relatively highly because of it. (Gunnery sergeant vs. an
      ordinary sergeant, for example.) This also means that he's probably
      the only member of the crew doing any major repairs.

      >That's pretty clear, the moral question is who was he before, and
      why did Klaus work on him...

      --Everybody seems to think of this as clear, but consider this:
      Wulfenbach has more stitches on him than most of the biological
      constructs that we've seen so far. There's no reason to not think
      that Dr. Dim is either (a) a full-fledged construct or (b) some
      other sort of brain experiment (remember the cat) except that the
      brain-deconstruction theory looks better from a plot perspective.

      >But then why wouldn't he have seen her for years? C.H. is by
      Mechanicsburg, well within the Wulfenbach Lands. And he's got easy
      air travel; he should be able to see his *wife* if she's anywhere
      within his lands. Unless she doesn't want to see him, but his
      statement didn't sound that way, sounded more like "unavoidable
      separation because I'm stuck here running this kindergarten".

      --I think that he's too busy being an absolute dictator and dealing
      with everything himself to take even a week's vacation to fly over
      and visit her. I really think that it's just a matter of overwork.

      >Also, we don't know C.H. is in his control in any real sense. He
      threatens eople with sending them there, but that doesn't mean he
      can get them out gain. If the kestle is alive and mad and possibly
      full of wounded Jaegerkin, he may just be treating it as a black
      hole. "Piss me off enough (and lack edeeming Spark value for my
      experiments) and I'll dump you there."

      --Dump them there HOW? He would at least need an arrival area, some
      way of making them go towards the castle rather than away from it,
      guards watching the castle to make sure that nothing nasty comes
      crawling out of it, &c. &c. &c. I think you get the picture.
      There's got to be a significant security (and probably research)
      force over there, and that requires someone pretty high-level in
      charge.


      "Anthony J. Albert" wrote:

      >I don't believe that Von Zinzer was maintaining the gunboat all by
      himself; it had a moderately large crew, of at least four or five.
      It struck me as a step in the direction of mechanization.

      --Well, as I said above, I don't think that every single member of
      the crew was a mechanic. Some of them may have known how to do
      basic work on their duty stations, but I'm betting that there was
      only one general mechanic onboard.

      >The question, though, is are these machines one-offs, or are they
      produced in larger numbers? The Baron evidently has the resources
      to produce a "large" number of soldiers, and there is evidence that
      others are able to produce steam-powered (or other powered)
      equipment, like the traction engine Adam was repairing, but in the
      earliest days of mechanization in the US, the village blacksmith was
      often expected to repair most machinery when it broke - no matter
      how complex. So, there may not be a large enough number of complex
      machines, outside of large towns, to really call
      it "industrialization".

      --Maybe not, but that gunboat had an awfully high hull number.

      >While Lucrezia's husband was off travelling to Mars, who could know
      that he wouldn't be back a month later?

      --Well, it's been 18 years now. I never said that they would get
      married five minutes after her husband disappered in a rowboat. How
      old is Gil? Just a bit short of 18, perhaps?


      Your insane friend,
      M. Alan Thomas II

      TPU Department of Defensive Installations and Security, undergraduate
    • Damien Sullivan
      ... Reasonable enough. ... Hmmph, I say. ... Dump: go up to the front door, knock, toss them in. Or hook up with an airship and shove them off. Sure, he can
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 5, 2003
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        On Thu, Sep 04, 2003 at 10:49:27PM -0000, M. Alan Thomas II wrote:
        > Damien Sullivan wrote:
        >
        > [In reference to Von Zinzer and his gunboat's repairs]
        > >Him and his crew, but yeah.
        >
        > --Actually, I was thinking that each member did something
        > different: Fire control, helm, communications, command,

        Reasonable enough.

        > --I think that he's too busy being an absolute dictator and dealing
        > with everything himself to take even a week's vacation to fly over
        > and visit her. I really think that it's just a matter of overwork.

        Hmmph, I say.

        > >Also, we don't know C.H. is in his control in any real sense. He
        > threatens eople with sending them there, but that doesn't mean he
        > can get them out gain. If the kestle is alive and mad and possibly
        > full of wounded Jaegerkin, he may just be treating it as a black
        > hole. "Piss me off enough (and lack edeeming Spark value for my
        > experiments) and I'll dump you there."
        >
        > --Dump them there HOW? He would at least need an arrival area, some
        > way of making them go towards the castle rather than away from it,
        > guards watching the castle to make sure that nothing nasty comes
        > crawling out of it, &c. &c. &c. I think you get the picture.
        > There's got to be a significant security (and probably research)
        > force over there, and that requires someone pretty high-level in
        > charge.

        Dump: go up to the front door, knock, toss them in. Or hook up with an
        airship and shove them off. Sure, he can control access to the castle, but I
        was distinguishing that from control *of* the castle.

        And if it's the broken Jaegers retirement home there might not be much of a
        security problem. Just an understanding that while it may be surrounded by
        Terra Wulfenbach, it is not itself under Klaus's jurisdiction. Gotta defend
        the family secrets, after all. No matter where they retire I don't the the
        Jaegers allowing Klaus (or anyone else) run of the place. We know they won't
        let him work on them.

        Although he was the Heterodyne's friend way back when, and if they don't know
        of any reason for that to have changed, and if there aren't many Heterodyne
        secrets there, they might let him some access. I still think they'd be in
        charge, though -- I don't see how they could let themselves not be.

        -xx- Damien X-)
      • gaertk
        [normalizing the quoting styles...] ... And they were supposed to fail anyway. ... The card game describes Omar as Villain and Mechanic (and Moloch is Soldier
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 5, 2003
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          [normalizing the quoting styles...]

          "M. Alan Thomas II" wrote:
          >
          > "Adam Canning" wrote:
          >
          >> No one was surprised that the Dihoxulator was given to a pair of
          >> non sparks to assemble.
          >
          > Yes, but they were extremely intelligent non-sparks with a spark-
          > class laboratory.

          And they were supposed to fail anyway.

          > Damien Sullivan wrote:
          >
          > [In reference to Von Zinzer and his gunboat's repairs]
          >> Him and his crew, but yeah.
          >
          > Actually, I was thinking that each member did something
          > different: Fire control, helm, communications, command,
          > engineering, or whatever. Von Zinzer was clearly attempting to pull
          > rank on Omar when he says "You're out of line, Sergeant." If you
          > will look at their coat collars, Von Zinzer has three bars of rank
          > to Omar's two. I suspect that Von Zinzer was the engineer and
          > ranked relatively highly because of it. (Gunnery sergeant vs. an
          > ordinary sergeant, for example.) This also means that he's probably
          > the only member of the crew doing any major repairs.

          The card game describes Omar as Villain and Mechanic (and Moloch is
          Soldier and Mechanic).

          >> But then why wouldn't he have seen her for years? C.H. is by
          >> Mechanicsburg, well within the Wulfenbach Lands. And he's got
          >> easy air travel; he should be able to see his *wife* if she's
          >> anywhere within his lands. Unless she doesn't want to see him,
          >> but his statement didn't sound that way, sounded more like
          >> "unavoidable separation because I'm stuck here running this
          >> kindergarten".
          >
          > I think that he's too busy being an absolute dictator and dealing
          > with everything himself to take even a week's vacation to fly over
          > and visit her. I really think that it's just a matter of overwork.

          Klaus seems like the kind of ruler who makes a point of visiting all
          the major cities of his realm as often as possible. And
          Mechanicsburg is right next door to Beetleburg.

          >> Also, we don't know C.H. is in his control in any real sense. He
          >> threatens eople with sending them there, but that doesn't mean he
          >> can get them out gain. If the kestle is alive and mad and
          >> possibly full of wounded Jaegerkin, he may just be treating it as
          >> a black hole. "Piss me off enough (and lack edeeming Spark value
          >> for my experiments) and I'll dump you there."
          >
          > Dump them there HOW?

          Othar's exit from issue 9 comes to mind.


          --KG
        • Damien Sullivan
          ... Irrelevant, since no one knew that. The point was that the assignment was plausible. -xx- Damien X-)
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 5, 2003
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            On Fri, Sep 05, 2003 at 11:47:29PM -0000, gaertk wrote:

            > >> No one was surprised that the Dihoxulator was given to a pair of
            > >> non sparks to assemble.
            > >
            > > Yes, but they were extremely intelligent non-sparks with a spark-
            > > class laboratory.
            >
            > And they were supposed to fail anyway.

            Irrelevant, since no one knew that. The point was that the assignment was
            plausible.

            -xx- Damien X-)
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