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  • M. Alan Thomas II
    As for the production discussion, we have Von Zinzer s comment that These days, machines are more important than soldiers. If you know how to fix machines it
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 1, 2003
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      As for the production discussion, we have Von Zinzer's comment
      that "These days, machines are more important than soldiers. If you
      know how to fix machines it makes you more valuable." (GG #6, page
      24) I think that this proves that the machines may be designed by
      sparks, but anyone with some mechanical aptitude can follow
      instructions and build or repair one. That he could maintain a
      gunboat all by himself from what he stole suggests that it isn't
      that hard if you know what you're doing. I'd be interested to see
      more of the results of the mundane industrial revolution alongside
      the sparky one; clearly people such as "Adam Clay" are expected to
      do work on non-sparky but still complex machines. This suggests a
      certain level of mundane industrialization. The same goes for the
      glassworks / corbettite terminal in issue #7.


      Speaking of issue #7, my vote on Dr. Dim is that he's really one of
      the Baron's spark-brain experiments. It's "that whole 'quality of
      life' question," to quote the baron.


      "KLAUS! Take care of Lucrezia until we return!!" -- GG #5, page 130

      "I haven't seen my wife in years." -- Baron Wulfenbach, GG #7
      Presuming that he "settled down" and got married after the
      Heterodynes disappeared (which would make his series of wistful
      statements flow in an orderly reverse-chronological fashion), I see
      no reason why he couldn't have gotten married to Lucrezia. Her
      husband was gone, and Klaus was an old friend. The family's estate
      was in shambles, she was suddenly on her own, and female sparks
      apparently need protection. (And as Gil points out, who would mess
      with the Baron's wife?) And we don't know what happened to her.
      Possibly she's still running Castle Heterodyne, which is now under
      the Baron's control.


      Also in issue #7, I think that Mr. Rovainen suddenly saw Agatha as
      the Other at the end of the issue when she was yelling at him.
      Prior to her snapping in the middle of the page, he was speaking to
      her as an equal. When she yelled at him "DON'T YOU HAVE SOMETHING
      THAT YOU SHOULD BE DOING?," he seemed startled for a moment ("I--
      / I--") before suddenly realizing something ("Ah...") and
      scurrying off. ("Yes, mistress.") He immediately goes and
      activates the hive engine. Thus, he clearly thinks that Agatha is
      the Other ("The Other lives--and I have seen her.") That is why he
      didn't activate the engine previously as well as why he activated
      the engine at that particular moment; Agatha ordered him to.


      Insanely yours,
      M. Alan Thomas II
      the CrazyDreamer
    • Bill Jackson
      ... I read through that section after Rovanien said he had seen The Other, and I didn t catch that. I still think that Klaus wife is a White Woman, and that
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 1, 2003
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        --- In girlgenius@yahoogroups.com, "M. Alan Thomas II"
        <CrazyDreamer@c...> wrote:

        > Also in issue #7, I think that Mr. Rovainen suddenly saw Agatha as
        > the Other at the end of the issue when she was yelling at him.
        > Prior to her snapping in the middle of the page, he was speaking to
        > her as an equal. When she yelled at him "DON'T YOU HAVE SOMETHING
        > THAT YOU SHOULD BE DOING?," he seemed startled for a moment ("I--
        > / I--") before suddenly realizing something ("Ah...") and
        > scurrying off. ("Yes, mistress.") He immediately goes and
        > activates the hive engine. Thus, he clearly thinks that Agatha is
        > the Other ("The Other lives--and I have seen her.") That is why he
        > didn't activate the engine previously as well as why he activated
        > the engine at that particular moment; Agatha ordered him to.
        >
        >

        I read through that section after Rovanien said he had seen The
        Other, and I didn't catch that.

        I still think that Klaus' wife is a White Woman, and that The Other
        is either a twisted, future version of Agatha or one of her
        decendents. Like I said before, one of th first things we were
        introduced to was time travel...
      • Damien Sullivan
        ... Him and his crew, but yeah. ... That s pretty clear, the moral question is who was he before, and why did Klaus work on him... ... Hmm. ... But then why
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 2, 2003
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          On Tue, Sep 02, 2003 at 02:14:06AM -0000, M. Alan Thomas II wrote:

          > instructions and build or repair one. That he could maintain a
          > gunboat all by himself from what he stole suggests that it isn't

          Him and his crew, but yeah.

          > Speaking of issue #7, my vote on Dr. Dim is that he's really one of
          > the Baron's spark-brain experiments. It's "that whole 'quality of
          > life' question," to quote the baron.

          That's pretty clear, the moral question is who was he before, and why did
          Klaus work on him...

          > "KLAUS! Take care of Lucrezia until we return!!" -- GG #5, page 130
          >
          > statements flow in an orderly reverse-chronological fashion), I see
          > no reason why he couldn't have gotten married to Lucrezia. Her

          Hmm.

          > Possibly she's still running Castle Heterodyne, which is now under
          > the Baron's control.

          But then why wouldn't he have seen her for years? C.H. is by Mechanicsburg,
          well within the Wulfenbach Lands. And he's got easy air travel; he should be
          able to see his *wife* if she's anywhere within his lands. Unless she doesn't
          want to see him, but his statement didn't sound that way, sounded more like
          "unavoidable separation because I'm stuck here running this kindergarten".

          Also, we don't know C.H. is in his control in any real sense. He threatens
          people with sending them there, but that doesn't mean he can get them out
          again. If the kestle is alive and mad and possibly full of wounded Jaegerkin,
          he may just be treating it as a black hole. "Piss me off enough (and lack
          redeeming Spark value for my experiments) and I'll dump you there."

          At least, the only references to C.H. I recall are his threatening Merlot, and
          the generals saying it could tell about Agatha but was mad and dying.

          I guess we don't even know where it is -- it's Mechanicsburg which was near
          Beetleburg, and I just assume the Castle is in or near Mechanicsburg since
          it's the "ancestral home of the Heterodynes."

          -xx- Damien X-)
        • Anthony J. Albert
          ... I don t believe that Von Zinzer was maintaining the gunboat all by himself; it had a moderately large crew, of at least four or five. It struck me as a
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 2, 2003
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            On 2 Sep 2003 at 2:14, M. Alan Thomas II wrote:
            >As for the production discussion, we have Von Zinzer's comment
            >that "These days, machines are more important than soldiers. If you
            >know how to fix machines it makes you more valuable." (GG #6, page
            >24) I think that this proves that the machines may be designed by
            >sparks, but anyone with some mechanical aptitude can follow
            >instructions and build or repair one. That he could maintain a
            >gunboat all by himself from what he stole suggests that it isn't
            >that hard if you know what you're doing. I'd be interested to see
            >more of the results of the mundane industrial revolution alongside
            >the sparky one; clearly people such as "Adam Clay" are expected to
            >do work on non-sparky but still complex machines. This suggests a
            >certain level of mundane industrialization. The same goes for the
            >glassworks / corbettite terminal in issue #7.

            I don't believe that Von Zinzer was maintaining the gunboat all by
            himself; it had a moderately large crew, of at least four or five. It
            struck me as a step in the direction of mechanization.

            The question, though, is are these machines one-offs, or are they
            produced in larger numbers? The Baron evidently has the resources to
            produce a "large" number of soldiers, and there is evidence that others
            are able to produce steam-powered (or other powered) equipment, like
            the traction engine Adam was repairing, but in the earliest days of
            mechanization in the US, the village blacksmith was often expected to
            repair most machinery when it broke - no matter how complex. So, there
            may not be a large enough number of complex machines, outside of large
            towns, to really call it "industrialization".

            >Speaking of issue #7, my vote on Dr. Dim is that he's really one of
            >the Baron's spark-brain experiments. It's "that whole 'quality of
            >life' question," to quote the baron.

            I thought this was pretty clearly inferred - that Dr. Dim had his brain
            mangled by the Baron's experiments. Now, I wouldn't put it past the
            Foglios to make this not so, but for now, it certainly seems to be
            heavily inferred. And creepy.

            >"KLAUS! Take care of Lucrezia until we return!!" -- GG #5, page 130
            >
            >"I haven't seen my wife in years." -- Baron Wulfenbach, GG #7
            >Presuming that he "settled down" and got married after the
            >Heterodynes disappeared (which would make his series of wistful
            >statements flow in an orderly reverse-chronological fashion), I see
            >no reason why he couldn't have gotten married to Lucrezia. Her
            >husband was gone, and Klaus was an old friend. The family's estate
            >was in shambles, she was suddenly on her own, and female sparks
            >apparently need protection. (And as Gil points out, who would mess
            >with the Baron's wife?) And we don't know what happened to her.
            >Possibly she's still running Castle Heterodyne, which is now under
            >the Baron's control.

            Maybe. I expect, though, that the Baron married someone else. While
            Lucrezia's husband was off travelling to Mars, who could know that he
            wouldn't be back a month later?

            [SNIP]
            Anthony Albert
            ===========================================================
            Anthony J. Albert albert@...
            Systems and Software Support Specialist Postmaster
            Computer Services - University of Maine, Presque Isle
            "This is only temporary, unless it works."
            --- Red Green
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