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Factorization of 11,236+

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  • jesh@mail.dk
    Hi Sam! Here follows the factorization of 11,236. It began as an ggnfs attempt, but sadly ggnfs isn t quite ready yet to handle a factorization of this scale
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 1 1:22 AM
      Hi Sam!

      Here follows the factorization of 11,236. It began as an ggnfs attempt, but sadly ggnfs isn't quite ready yet to handle a factorization of this scale effortlessly yet. Thus the relations collected was converted into CWI format, and the factorization thus stands as a CWI GNFS C136 factorization.

      Credit goes jointly to Tom Cage and Jes Hansen

      --- Factorizatiob of 11,236+ ---

      Factorization completed after 1791.57 seconds, at Fri Apr 1 11:11:46 2005
      Original number had 136 digits:
      1988785224338206441736697227355084839346337697529189335828033172544919474764496481130237288855098694100947699948914857840989982990335121
      Probable prime factor 1 has 77 digits:
      45826489049864977797692632840139991865685587433427696948622219827630008015737
      Probable prime factor 2 has 59 digits:
      43398158261134913555879300403231730887907132613176534633433

      ---
      Cheers,
      Jes

      PS: Sam, I've lost my log files. Could you please tell me what numbers from the Cunningham list you have me credited for?
    • ggnfsmonico
      Hi Jes, I was thinking about asking you if you could send me the relations on DVD, but it occurs to me that I don t even have a decent enough machine to do the
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 1 6:27 AM
        Hi Jes,
        I was thinking about asking you if you could send me the relations
        on DVD, but it occurs to me that I don't even have a decent enough
        machine to do the debugging. The one powerhouse machine that I had
        hasn't been the same since it got a new mobo, and my laptop doesn't
        have enough RAM. But my suspicion is that GGNFS failed for the same
        reason that it has failed on large factorizations for others - this
        ll_catFields() re-alloc problem (which, if gone unnoticed, will
        probably/possibly cause a matsolve failure, or even a sqrt failure).
        Do you happen to have any idea what went wrong?

        Cheers,
        Chris



        --- In ggnfs@yahoogroups.com, jesh@m... wrote:
        > Hi Sam!
        >
        > Here follows the factorization of 11,236. It began as an ggnfs
        attempt, but sadly ggnfs isn't quite ready yet to handle a
        factorization of this scale effortlessly yet. Thus the relations
        collected was converted into CWI format, and the factorization thus
        stands as a CWI GNFS C136 factorization.
        >
        > Credit goes jointly to Tom Cage and Jes Hansen
        >
        > --- Factorizatiob of 11,236+ ---
        >
        > Factorization completed after 1791.57 seconds, at Fri Apr 1
        11:11:46 2005
        > Original number had 136 digits:
        >
        1988785224338206441736697227355084839346337697529189335828033172544919474764496481130237288855098694100947699948914857840989982990335121
        > Probable prime factor 1 has 77 digits:
        >
        45826489049864977797692632840139991865685587433427696948622219827630008015737
        > Probable prime factor 2 has 59 digits:
        > 43398158261134913555879300403231730887907132613176534633433
        >
        > ---
        > Cheers,
        > Jes
        >
        > PS: Sam, I've lost my log files. Could you please tell me what
        numbers from the Cunningham list you have me credited for?
      • Jes Hansen
        ... I ve kept the relations because this is an interesting case. Anybody who want to have a look at the raw relations can just email me with a snailmail
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 1 4:43 PM
          > I was thinking about asking you if you could send me the relations
          > on DVD, but it occurs to me that I don't even have a decent enough
          > machine to do the debugging.

          I've kept the relations because this is an interesting case. Anybody who
          want to have a look at the raw relations can just email me with a snailmail
          adress, and I will send the relations on some CD's (or DVD's, if that's what
          the sender wants) tomorrow. As an alternative I am willing to provide the
          files by FTP.

          > ll_catFields() re-alloc problem (which, if gone unnoticed, will
          > probably/possibly cause a matsolve failure, or even a sqrt failure).
          > Do you happen to have any idea what went wrong?

          I tried the 0.75.1 version complied with the MinGW binaries, but that also
          failed (same error again).

          Since I'm neither fluent in C, or able to program in C, I can only suggest
          things to people with programming skills:

          My gut feeling is that something is very wrong with the way ggnfs handles
          the collected relations. The CWI suite had no trouble in factoring 11,236+
          with the collected relations. (Which is exactly the ggnfs relations
          collected by Tom Cage and I)

          I have a dual boot system, so when I ran into the memory trouble with
          Windows I tried to compile the programs under Linux.

          Compiling the programs under Linux is much easier than under MinGW :-)

          When I ran procrels on the collected relations, procrels told me that I
          needed to sieve for more relations. Since I knew I needed only 23,4M
          relations and I had 25,5M relations, this was where I decided ggnfs was
          wrong.

          This was the point where I decided to switch to CWI.

          --
          Cheers,
          Jes

          >> Original number had 136 digits:
          >>
          > 1988785224338206441736697227355084839346337697529189335828033172544919474764496481130237288855098694100947699948914857840989982990335121
          >> Probable prime factor 1 has 77 digits:
          >>
          > 45826489049864977797692632840139991865685587433427696948622219827630008015737
          >> Probable prime factor 2 has 59 digits:
          >> 43398158261134913555879300403231730887907132613176534633433
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