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Re: Shared genealogies and crowd sourcing

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  • johnecarter
    In ten+ years of tracing a couple of family lines, the most success I ve had in getting other people to contribute to a family tree is with a printed
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 5, 2012
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      In ten+ years of tracing a couple of family lines, the most success I've had in getting other people to contribute to a family tree is with a printed multi-generation chart with pictures - posted on a wall at the site where the yearly reunion is held. Those who don't find family member pictures on the chart almost always contribute at least pictures - and while you have their attention you can ask for other info.

      This can lead to big charts - one year I had access to a roll-fed plotter and the chart was 3 feet high and 20+ feet long but almost everyone wanted to themselves and their immediate family. There were even a few who looked at multiple generations.

      I've had almost zero success with anything promised for 'later' - maybe 1 person in 100 actually follows through.

      John
    • Sherry
      A lot of people do that and have lots of pens or pencils hanging around so the blanks can be filled for dates and children. Sounds fun! Sherry ... From:
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 5, 2012
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        A lot of people do that and have lots of pens or pencils hanging around so
        the blanks can be filled for dates and children.

        Sounds fun!

        Sherry


        -----Original Message-----
        From: gensoft@yahoogroups.com [mailto:gensoft@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        johnecarter
        Sent: Wednesday, December 05, 2012 4:34 PM
        To: gensoft@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [gensoft] Re: Shared genealogies and crowd sourcing

        In ten+ years of tracing a couple of family lines, the most success I've had
        in getting other people to contribute to a family tree is with a printed
        multi-generation chart with pictures - posted on a wall at the site where
        the yearly reunion is held. Those who don't find family member pictures on
        the chart almost always contribute at least pictures - and while you have
        their attention you can ask for other info.

        This can lead to big charts - one year I had access to a roll-fed plotter
        and the chart was 3 feet high and 20+ feet long but almost everyone wanted
        to themselves and their immediate family. There were even a few who looked
        at multiple generations.

        I've had almost zero success with anything promised for 'later' - maybe 1
        person in 100 actually follows through.

        John
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