Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [genphoto] scanner with transparancy carrier

Expand Messages
  • abjacobs1@aol.com
    Have been shopping on the Internet and do not understand the difference between Hardware Resolution: 600 dpi x 2400 dpi and Hardware Resolution: 600 dpi x
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 30, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      Have been shopping on the Internet and do not understand the difference
      between "Hardware Resolution: 600 dpi x 2400 dpi" and "Hardware Resolution:
      600 dpi x 1200 dpi". The maximum resolution was the same. What difference
      will it make in my picture?
      Ann in Oklahoma
    • Steve Knoblock
      They are both 600dpi scanners. This figure is somewhat misleading, because you need to understand what both numbers mean. The image sensor is made of a series
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 30, 2000
      • 0 Attachment
        They are both 600dpi scanners. This figure is somewhat misleading, because
        you need to understand what both numbers mean. The image sensor is made of
        a series of cells all in a row that detect the amount of light reflected
        from the photo. This sensor actually contains 600 cells per inch (this is
        the first figure). As far as I know, they do not make image sensors that
        contain any more than 600 cells per inch.

        The second figure represents how finely the image sensor and light bar can
        inch along the glass. This figure should match the same resolution as the
        image sensor. For 600dpi, the scanner should be able to move finely enough
        to produce 600dpi per inch of movement. So you get a 600 X 600 dpi square.
        If you acquire 600dpi across the image sensor and 1200dpi along the scanner
        glass direction, the next scan would overlap some of the pixels acquired in
        the previous scan motion. What this really means is that the scanner is
        interpolating (making up some phony estimated pixels) to create a 1200 x
        1200dpi scan.

        Any time a scanner uses interpolation, the image is not going to attain the
        same quality that a true optical resolution gives. I never use the
        interpolated resolutions of my scanner, because I am not satisfied by the
        results.

        To determine the true resolution of your scanner, look for the Optical
        Resolution figure. In your case, they should both be 600dpi. The marketing
        people say "Hardware Resolution" to make you think that is the optical res.

        Steve


        >between "Hardware Resolution: 600 dpi x 2400 dpi" and "Hardware Resolution:
        >600 dpi x 1200 dpi". The maximum resolution was the same. What difference
        >will it make in my picture?

        Steve Knoblock popular history
        editor@... of photography
        www.city-gallery.com and genealogy
        www.phphelp.com
      • abjacobs1@aol.com
        ... Thanks, Steve. I will buy the cheaper one since it will not change the scanned image. Ann in Oklahoma
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 30, 2000
        • 0 Attachment
          >They are both 600dpi scanners. This figure is somewhat misleading, because
          >you need to understand what both numbers mean.

          Thanks, Steve. I will buy the cheaper one since it will not change the
          scanned image.
          Ann in Oklahoma
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.