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[genphoto] Re: Ambrotype Cleanup

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  • Dvgagel@aol.com
    If I were you, I would take it to a photograph conservator at a state historical society or university if one is near by to see what their diagnosis is of the
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 1, 2000
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      If I were you, I would take it to a photograph conservator at a state
      historical society or university if one is near by to see what their
      diagnosis is of the stains you mentioned. The brown on the back is the paint
      used to make the image positive. Is it intact? If not, you might try
      putting a truly black piece of paper behind the image to see if that improves
      the viewing.
      RE: the front of the glass. Is there a stain somewhere that is not on the
      image part? IF so, you could try using distilled water on a soft cotton
      cloth and see if that takes it off.
      D
    • LARRY KEDDY
      ... The above person (whomever they may be) is right. Unless you ve had some experience and know what you are doing, you re better off to have a
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 1, 2000
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        Dvgagel@... wrote:

        > If I were you, I would take it to a photograph conservator at a state
        > historical society or university if one is near by to see what their
        > diagnosis is of the stains you mentioned. .............

        ------------------------->>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>><<<<<<<<<<<<<<-----------------------

        The above person (whomever they may be) is right. Unless you've had some
        experience and know what you are doing, you're better off to have a
        photorestoration expert do the job for you.
        A mistake on a Daguerreotype, Ambrotype or Tintype is unually not reversable.
        I've been in photorestoration for 12 years and the smartest thing I've learned
        so far is when to stop.

        Larry Keddy
        New Minas
        Nova Scotia
        Canada
      • Steve Knoblock
        Here is some extra info on the Ambrotype: The ambrotype image requires a dark backing in order to be seen as a positive image. Some photographers used a sheet
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 7, 2000
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          Here is some extra info on the Ambrotype:

          The ambrotype image requires a dark backing in order to be seen as a
          positive image. Some photographers used a sheet of dark card stock, but
          most coated the back of the glass. Some early ambrotypists merely lacquered
          the inside of the case. Others experimented with materials such as black
          velvet. The most common method was coating the back of the plate with black
          Japan lacquer.

          Often, it appears as if the ambrotype image is flaking off from the plate,
          but in most instances it is only the backing used to make the image appear
          positive that is deteriorating. This form of deterioration appears as a
          kind of mottling. After nearly 150 years, the lacquer backing has a
          tendency to crack and flake off.

          Most ambrotype plates were coated with black Japan lacquer on the side
          opposite the image. Exceptions are possible and some ambrotypists may have
          coated the image side. While such images are rare, O. Henry Mace in his
          Collector's Guide to Early Photographs (p. 67) warns that if you decide to
          scrape away the old black varnish from an ambrotype plate, you should be
          certain that the image is on the opposite side of the plate, and not under
          the varnish.

          The full article is on my web site.

          http://www.city-gallery.com/earlyphoto/research/ambrotypes_revisited.html

          BTW I noticed that a stray piece of HTML code was actually preventing my
          site search from working. Of all things, it was asking for your email
          address! Fixed now.

          Steve

          Steve Knoblock popular history
          editor@... of photography
          www.city-gallery.com and genealogy
          www.phphelp.com
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