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photo sheets

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  • maureenmcmanus
    I am new to this, and I was wondering what I can display my cdv s in. Right now I have them in baseball card holders in a binder, but the cdvs are too tall.
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 8, 2007
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      I am new to this, and I was wondering what I can display my cdv's in.
      Right now I have them in baseball card holders in a binder, but the
      cdvs are too tall. I ordered what i thought was a sheet of photo
      holders, but they are individual cdv holders. Basically, they are
      useless to me. I also have cabinet cards that I would like a better
      storage compartment for.
      If anyone has any ideas, please let me know.
      Thanks,
      Maureen
    • arcosinca
      Hi Maureen, You could try gluing the individual CDV holders into scrapbook pages? That would make them easy to take out and look at. I do that with my best
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 12, 2007
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        Hi Maureen, You could try gluing the individual CDV holders into scrapbook pages? That
        would make them easy to take out and look at. I do that with my best old postcards (the
        rest are just in a box...)

        Christine

        --- In genphoto@yahoogroups.com, "maureenmcmanus" <maureenmcmanus@...> wrote:
        >
        > I am new to this, and I was wondering what I can display my cdv's in.
        > Right now I have them in baseball card holders in a binder, but the
        > cdvs are too tall. I ordered what i thought was a sheet of photo
        > holders, but they are individual cdv holders. Basically, they are
        > useless to me. I also have cabinet cards that I would like a better
        > storage compartment for.
        > If anyone has any ideas, please let me know.
        > Thanks,
        > Maureen
        >
      • Michael Stupinski
        Sorry to sound dumb about this, but I have to ask: What is a CDV? Thanks. .....................Mike
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 12, 2007
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          Sorry to sound dumb about this, but I have to ask:

          What is a CDV?

          Thanks.
          .....................Mike


          On Oct 12, 2007, at 2:39 PM, arcosinca wrote:

          > Hi Maureen, You could try gluing the individual CDV holders into
          > scrapbook pages? That
          > would make them easy to take out and look at. I do that with my
          > best old postcards (the
          > rest are just in a box...)
          >
          > Christine
          >
          > --- In genphoto@yahoogroups.com, "maureenmcmanus"
          > <maureenmcmanus@...> wrote:
          >>
          >> I am new to this, and I was wondering what I can display my cdv's in.
          >> Right now I have them in baseball card holders in a binder, but the
          >> cdvs are too tall. I ordered what i thought was a sheet of photo
          >> holders, but they are individual cdv holders. Basically, they are
          >> useless to me. I also have cabinet cards that I would like a better
          >> storage compartment for.
          >> If anyone has any ideas, please let me know.
          >> Thanks,
          >> Maureen
          >>
        • Brina
          Mike, I presume Maureen is referring to cartes de visite, which were introduce in 1860 and acted as a sort of photo calling card, with the owner s portrait.
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 6 10:04 PM
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            Mike, I presume Maureen is referring to cartes de visite, which were
            introduce in 1860 and acted as a sort of "photo" calling card, with
            the owner's portrait. They are 4 1/4 x 2 1/2", so close to a
            baseball card size.

            Maureen, please don't store them in the baseball card sleeves or glue
            them into a book! You can irreperably harm them. The baseball card
            sleeves are likely made of PVC vinyl, which is the worst thing you
            can put next to photos. Non-archival glues are acidic and will also
            deteriorate the images.

            My suggestion is to insert each into clear archival sleeves for
            protection, then stored vertically in archival boxes. In this way
            you can (gently!) handle & view them safely. The sleeves should be
            made of polypropylne, polyethylene or Milar (polyester). Archival
            products should acid-free and lignin-free (lignin is in wood
            products; both harm photos). You can buy these products from several
            vendors, such as Light Impressions, Godfrey's, Archival Methods (I
            don't work for any of these people -- I just am pointing you to the
            products).

            Hope this helps.
          • maureenmcmanus
            Thank you very much. I would never glue them, but I do have the sleeves, so I will start putting them in. Again thanks for your help. --- In
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 27 9:42 AM
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              Thank you very much. I would never glue them, but I do have the
              sleeves, so I will start putting them in.
              Again thanks for your help. --- In genphoto@yahoogroups.com, "Brina"
              <brinacbolanz@...> wrote:
              >
              > Mike, I presume Maureen is referring to cartes de visite, which
              were
              > introduce in 1860 and acted as a sort of "photo" calling card,
              with
              > the owner's portrait. They are 4 1/4 x 2 1/2", so close to a
              > baseball card size.
              >
              > Maureen, please don't store them in the baseball card sleeves or
              glue
              > them into a book! You can irreperably harm them. The baseball
              card
              > sleeves are likely made of PVC vinyl, which is the worst thing you
              > can put next to photos. Non-archival glues are acidic and will
              also
              > deteriorate the images.
              >
              > My suggestion is to insert each into clear archival sleeves for
              > protection, then stored vertically in archival boxes. In this way
              > you can (gently!) handle & view them safely. The sleeves should
              be
              > made of polypropylne, polyethylene or Milar (polyester). Archival
              > products should acid-free and lignin-free (lignin is in wood
              > products; both harm photos). You can buy these products from
              several
              > vendors, such as Light Impressions, Godfrey's, Archival Methods (I
              > don't work for any of these people -- I just am pointing you to
              the
              > products).
              >
              > Hope this helps.
              >
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