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scanning books

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  • dolores desideri
    Are there any good scanning books that explain the things we ve discussed this week, such as when to raise the resolution when working with photographs? I ve
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 6, 2006
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      Are there any good scanning books that explain the things we've
      discussed this week, such as when to raise the resolution when working
      with photographs? I've learned so much from these discussions and I
      would like to learn more.


      dolores
    • Ken Allen
      Hi Dolores, There is a book that talks mostly about what to do with the images once they are in the computer, but does also cover many of the scanning issues:
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 7, 2006
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        Hi Dolores,

        There is a book that talks mostly about what to do with the images
        once they are in the computer, but does also cover many of the
        scanning issues:

        Photoshop Restoration and Retouching,
        3rd Ed.
        by Katrin Eismann.

        http://www.digitalretouch.org/

        Best,
        Ken Allen
        Image Conservator, Inc.
        www.savethephotos.com


        On Apr 6, 2006, at 9:09 PM, dolores desideri wrote:

        > Are there any good scanning books that explain the things we've
        > discussed this week, such as when to raise the resolution when working
        > with photographs? I've learned so much from these discussions and I
        > would like to learn more.
        >
        >
        > dolores
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > GenPhoto http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genphoto/
        > Post message: genphoto@yahoogroups.com
        > Subscribe: genphoto-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > Unsubscribe: genphoto-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > IT MAY TAKE SOME TIME BEFORE MAIL STOPS! ASK YAHOO ABOUT IT! NOT ME!
        > Contact list owner: http://www.city-gallery.com/contact/
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Historic Photo Archive
        I agree with Ken about Katrin s book, for working with vintage photos it is the best bang for the buck of any publication. When I set out to learn Photoshop, I
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 8, 2006
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          I agree with Ken about Katrin's book, for working with vintage photos it is
          the best bang for the buck of any publication.

          When I set out to learn Photoshop, I bought three books, hired a tutor, and
          joined a bunch of internet groups like this one.

          the most useful of all were the internet discussion groups, however I
          couldn't have done it without all three.

          When I found a person who was exceptionally knowledgeable posting, I would
          review the archives for their previous posts. A search of the digital
          black&white group for Roy Harrington will get you further along in technique
          in an hour or two than most people will learn in a year.

          For a person interested in learning scanning of vintage photos and paper,
          several of the most important techniques to learn are:

          **learning to set levels by holding down the command-option keys (similar
          for PC) while moving your level slider -- this shows you clipping only. It
          is essential to avoid clipping in your scans, this is the top mistake that
          most people make (anyone who uses automatic settings to adjust levels is
          never going to get a publication quality scan)

          **once you set levels properly, you need to adjust the contrast of the image
          using curves. command-M

          **once you have set these, you can use the history erase brush to tame
          excessive contrast in local areas. This is one of the most important and
          useful tools to achieve a great scan. after local treatment, global levels
          can be re-set and give a great improvement.

          **learn the straighten tool, it is in the measure tool and is used with
          rotate/arbitrary. It will automatically straighten any crooked photo or
          text.

          These tools are used on almost every scan that I make, and are essential for
          quality scanning.

          My favorite groups:
          Digital Black & White @ Yahoo
          Scan Hi-End @ Yahoo

          Good luck

          --
          Thomas Robinson
          http://www.historicphotoarchive.com
        • dolores desideri
          I m using Elements 4 and not PhotoShop so some of those tools are not part of my program. dolores
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 9, 2006
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            I'm using Elements 4 and not PhotoShop so some of those tools are not
            part of my program.

            dolores
            On Apr 9, 2006, at 5:53 AM, genphoto@yahoogroups.com wrote:

            > From: "Historic Photo Archive" tom@...
            > Date: Sat Apr 8, 2006 3:53pm(PDT)
            > Subject: Re: scanning books
            >
            > For a person interested in learning scanning of vintage photos and
            > paper,
            > several of the most important techniques to learn are:
            >
            > **learning to set levels by holding down the command-option keys
            > (similar
            > for PC) while moving your level slider -- this shows you clipping
            > only. It
            > is essential to avoid clipping in your scans, this is the top mistake
            > that
            > most people make (anyone who uses automatic settings to adjust levels
            > is
            > never going to get a publication quality scan)
            >
            > **once you set levels properly, you need to adjust the contrast of the
            > image
            > using curves. command-M
            >
            > **once you have set these, you can use the history erase brush to tame
            > excessive contrast in local areas. This is one of the most important
            > and
            > useful tools to achieve a great scan. after local treatment, global
            > levels
            > can be re-set and give a great improvement.
            >
            > **learn the straighten tool, it is in the measure tool and is used with
            > rotate/arbitrary. It will automatically straighten any crooked photo
            > or
            > text.
            >
            > These tools are used on almost every scan that I make, and are
            > essential for
            > quality scanning.
            >
            > My favorite groups:
            > Digital Black & White @ Yahoo
            > Scan Hi-End @ Yahoo
            >
            > Good luck
            >
            > --
            > Thomas Robinson
            > http://www.historicphotoarchive.com
          • ngchesnutt@aol.com
            Please post the name and author of the book on scanning again. Somehow I missed it.
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 9, 2006
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              Please post the name and author of the book on scanning again. Somehow
              I missed it.
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