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Re: [genphoto] Epson Perfection 4490

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  • ngchesnutt@aol.com
    Have you read the information about home burned CDs do not hold up and that you should store things on an additional hard drive? I would like to hear comments
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 3 11:57 AM
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      Have you read the information about home burned CDs do not hold up and
      that you should store things on an additional hard drive? I would like
      to hear comments about this information from those better informed than
      I am.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Whitney McMahan <wbmcmahan@...>
      To: genphoto@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Mon, 03 Apr 2006 13:09:30 -0400
      Subject: [genphoto] Epson Perfection 4490

      Ok I've been on this list for at least 8 years! I've watched all
      the
      "which scanner should I buy" dialogue with mild interest as I was not
      ready to purchase one yet.

      Now, I'm getting serious. I love HP products, but get the vibe from
      this list that Epson is better. I also understand that the software
      that
      comes with the scanners isn't all that great. I don't know if that
      means the driver software or the user interface software. I have
      Adobe Photoshop Elements 3.0 already, but am not proficient in its
      use.

      I'm getting ready for a road trip this summer with my sister. We are
      on a mission to scan all the old photographs "on site" that our uncle
      is hoarding. I will bring my labtop and the scanner.

      We will be scanning old b&w from 1900 - 1940, along with negatives
      that are maybe 2x3 inches? Maybe an occaisonal letter, newspaper
      article and birth/death certs. I'll buy all the cd's that I need to
      store
      them eventually in the bank safe deposit.

      I'm looking at the Epson Perfection 4490 flatbed scanner for about
      $250. Any comments or suggestions? I'm willing to spend a little
      more if there is something far better. Opinions please!

      thanks,

      Whitney






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    • Steve Knoblock
      ... Most professional photographers I know prefer Epson scanners and printers. I would say that HP products are easier for consumers to use and Epson products
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 4 12:24 PM
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        >Now, I'm getting serious. I love HP products, but get the vibe from
        >this list that Epson is better. I also understand that the software that
        >comes with the scanners isn't all that great. I don't know if that

        Most professional photographers I know prefer Epson scanners and
        printers. I would say that HP products are easier for consumers to use
        and Epson products tend to be more for technically incline people who
        are more demanding. My perception is the quality and performance of
        Epson is better suited to professional use.

        I have a very negative view of HP, which used to be a great company
        with excellent products (they made great scientific calculators). We
        had an HP scanner that we had to fight with to get a correct scan. In
        fact it was impossible to get a correct scan of certain items due to
        its automatic image rotation feature, which could not be disabled.
        Also, it needed to be frequently rebooted (actually unplugged from the
        wall wart and plugged back in) when it stopped talking to the PC. The
        PC was an HP. This was just too much for us, it is ridiculous when a
        PC maker cannot produce a peripheral that works with their own
        computers. There may be excellent HP products, but it will take a lot
        of convincing to get me to buy one again. I actually got the scanner
        to work better by hooking it up to my Windows XP computer and using
        the Windows scanning wizard. That was able to control the thing better
        than the HP provided software.

        My friend, who is a very picky photographer, looked into the longevity
        of Epson versus HP inkjet prints, and at the time his opinion was that
        Epson was more trustworthy in their claims about permanence than HP.
        He called both their technical centers seeking information, and was
        able to discover that HP was, let us say, exaggerating, in his
        opinion. I am inclined to agree with him and trust Epson more than the
        other manufacturers when it comes to lightfastness. However, since
        this is anecdotal and personal opinion, you should do your own
        research.

        A good example of the difference in approach to products between Epson
        and HP is their 4x6 photo printer. When the little Epson 4x6 printer
        came out, it lacked a color LCD display. The HP had a large color LCD
        display. If you look generally at the HP printers, the HP offers
        consumer friendly features like color LCD displays, wifi printing,
        etc. where Epson appears to concentrate more on technical features. I
        would say they concentrate more on image quality and lightfastness
        than gimmicks, but that is my opinion.

        The software that comes with my Epson I would say is not that easy for
        consumers to use. Although it does have some easy to use modes that
        for non-technical people, there are gotchas that would trip up the a
        user who is not very experienced using a computer. You could not give
        it to the average older person and expect them to just use it. Using
        some of the features like negative scanning, can be a challenge.

        I would say that HP tends to include drivers and interfaces that are
        more attractive to casual users and Epson tends to make ones that are
        more attractive to professionals, although they do make an effort to
        provide an "easy button."

        Others may have a different story, but that is mine.

        >I'm getting ready for a road trip this summer with my sister. We are
        >on a mission to scan all the old photographs "on site" that our uncle
        >is hoarding. I will bring my labtop and the scanner.
        >
        >We will be scanning old b&w from 1900 - 1940, along with negatives
        >that are maybe 2x3 inches? Maybe an occaisonal letter, newspaper
        >article and birth/death certs. I'll buy all the cd's that I need to store
        >them eventually in the bank safe deposit.

        Most scanners with negative scanning capability only provide for 35mm
        film or slides. My Epson can handle some medium format negatives.
        About 4x5 and 4x9cm. We have managed to scan some unusual sized
        negatives near that size, but it can be a struggle. Fitting the
        negative into the tray can be tricky. Also, I had to take control
        using Pro mode in the software and select settings to force to accept
        what I wanted it to do.


        >
        >I'm looking at the Epson Perfection 4490 flatbed scanner for about
        >$250. Any comments or suggestions? I'm willing to spend a little
        >more if there is something far better. Opinions please!

        I have an Epson 4180 and it is sufficient for all my print scanning
        purposes. It has more than enough optical resolution to satisfy my
        needs for archiving photographs digitally. I was unhappy with the
        resolution for film or slide scanning. It is fine for making small
        prints and reasonable for arching family photos, but I was
        dissatisfied with the quality of the results when scanning my 35mm
        black and white negatives. I think if you are a serious amateur
        photographer or professional photographer, a negative scanner is the
        better choice over a flatbed. Some of the very high end flatbeds might
        be sufficient, but I would prefer the negative scanner.

        Anything at the 4180 or higher should be more than capable for family
        photo purposes.

        Steve
      • Susan B. Farmer
        I still like the Umax. There s no problem with scanning negatives (or transparencies) because the transparency adaptor is a new *lid* If it will fit on the
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 4 12:33 PM
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          I still like the Umax. There's no problem with scanning negatives (or
          transparencies) because the "transparency adaptor" is a new *lid* If
          it will fit on the glass, you can scan it as a transparency if you want
          to. I've never used their consumer products, just their professional
          ones. We have a PowerLook III with a SCSI connector (shows you how old
          it is) and it runs^H^H^H^Hscans rings around everything else that I've
          ever used. You can control every aspect of the scan.

          Susan
          -----
          Susan Farmer
          sfarmer@...
          University of Tennessee
          Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
          http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
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