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  • Susan B. Farmer
    I know that we ve talked about flatbed scanners and driver software on here before ... I have an HO Scanjet 3500c. Nice scanner. Does a nice job. I **HATE**
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 29, 2005
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      I know that we've talked about flatbed scanners and driver software on
      here before ...

      I have an HO Scanjet 3500c. Nice scanner. Does a nice job. I **HATE**
      the scanner driver that comes with it. It's not bad if you want to scan
      just a single image -- but I've got a 3 inch stack of photos that I want
      to scan, and the thought of having to wait on the scanner software to
      initialize for 8each* picture -- and then have to re-do the settings
      each time is making me want to throw it out the window. I have a Umax
      Powerlook at school, and I love that software. I've used other HP
      scanners that had a much more friendly interface.

      Any suggestions?

      Theoretically, it saves the scanning profile, but I have to re-load it
      for each picture, and then turn of image sharpening.

      *sigh*

      Susan
      -----
      Susan Farmer
      sfarmer@...
      University of Tennessee
      Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
      http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
    • Steve Knoblock
      ... Our experience with an HP scanner was not good. It was purchased with an HP computer. However, we were never able to get the HP scanner to work reliably
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 29, 2005
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        On Sat, 29 Oct 2005 13:23:30 -0500, you wrote:

        >I know that we've talked about flatbed scanners and driver software on
        >here before ...
        >
        >I have an HO Scanjet 3500c. Nice scanner. Does a nice job. I **HATE**
        >the scanner driver that comes with it. It's not bad if you want to scan

        Our experience with an HP scanner was not good. It was purchased with
        an HP computer. However, we were never able to get the HP scanner to
        work reliably with the HP scanner. The software was poorly design
        also. There was no way to turn off automatic features. You could not
        tell it to stop analyzing the image and making assumptions about how
        it should be scanned. For example, it refused to scan 45rpm record
        jackets without rotating them to an number of crazy angles. You could
        not turn this "fix rotated image" feature off. It would also need to
        be unplugged and powered back up frequently to reset.

        We now have an Epson Perfection 4180 PHOTO and are very happy with its
        semi-Pro features. It does not quite have the resolution to satisfy my
        requirements for 35mm negative scanning. I was a little disappointed
        with the results of scanning 35mm black and white negative film and
        with quality of prints I could make. The next level up in the Epson
        line would probably be better for a professional photographer or art
        photographer, but 35mm negatives and slides are generally acceptable
        for family photos. Although not a large area (about 6x4cm) you can do
        some old medium format negatives. I would have liked a larger area for
        scanning transparencies, up to 4x5 inches or larger, but that is a
        rarity. A film scanner would be preferable for the 35mm negatives and
        slides.

        The driver is fairly good with the ability to save profiles. You can
        use the preview to setup a number of scans of slides or negatives
        automatically. I find all scanners fairly slow resetting between print
        scans. I do not have to reload the profile or turn any "dummies"
        features off in the Pro mode. It has three levels of modes.

        I would not call the interface totally friendly or intuitive. The
        proverbial grandmother might have trouble with it, certainly the pro
        features, but I find it acceptable.

        Steve
      • LDYTRAMP
        I don t know about a HP 3500 but my HP 4070 comes with a HP Director that is loaded to my desk top where I can set all of my settings and they are kept for all
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 30, 2005
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          I don't know about a HP 3500 but my HP 4070 comes with a HP Director
          that is loaded to my desk top where I can set all of my settings and
          they are kept for all of the photo's that I'm scanning for a complet
          session of scanning.
          If I scan using the quick button on the front of the scanner I have
          to set the settings for each picture.
          Not sure if this is the problem with your 3500 but it could be if
          that is the way that you are scanning.
          I've used HP scanners for years and have been very happy.

          --- In genphoto@yahoogroups.com, "Susan B. Farmer" <sfarmer@g...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I know that we've talked about flatbed scanners and driver
          software on
          > here before ...
          >
          > I have an HO Scanjet 3500c. Nice scanner. Does a nice job. I
          **HATE**
          > the scanner driver that comes with it. It's not bad if you want
          to scan
          > just a single image -- but I've got a 3 inch stack of photos that
          I want
          > to scan, and the thought of having to wait on the scanner software
          to
          > initialize for 8each* picture -- and then have to re-do the
          settings
          > each time is making me want to throw it out the window. I have a
          Umax
          > Powerlook at school, and I love that software. I've used other HP
          > scanners that had a much more friendly interface.
          >
          > Any suggestions?
          >
          > Theoretically, it saves the scanning profile, but I have to re-
          load it
          > for each picture, and then turn of image sharpening.
          >
          > *sigh*
          >
          > Susan
          > -----
          > Susan Farmer
          > sfarmer@g...
          > University of Tennessee
          > Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
          > http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
          >
        • Susan B. Farmer
          ... This one has the director as well -- but the sharpen defaults to medium with every image. I did manage to make it scan everyting at 300 dpi and safe
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 30, 2005
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            Quoting LDYTRAMP <ldytramp@...>:

            > I don't know about a HP 3500 but my HP 4070 comes with a HP Director
            > that is loaded to my desk top where I can set all of my settings and
            > they are kept for all of the photo's that I'm scanning for a complet
            > session of scanning.
            > If I scan using the quick button on the front of the scanner I have
            > to set the settings for each picture.
            > Not sure if this is the problem with your 3500 but it could be if
            > that is the way that you are scanning.
            > I've used HP scanners for years and have been very happy.

            This one has the director as well -- but the "sharpen" defaults to
            "medium" with every image. I did manage to make it scan everyting at
            300 dpi and safe as a .tif file, but I don't want the software deciding
            what I do and don't want sharpened.

            *sigh*

            susan
            -----
            Susan Farmer
            sfarmer@...
            University of Tennessee
            Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
            http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
          • Steve Knoblock
            ... I agree that this should be an option. The manufacturers have something of a dilemma when it comes to sharpening. Images require a little sharpening to
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 30, 2005
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              >300 dpi and safe as a .tif file, but I don't want the software deciding
              >what I do and don't want sharpened.

              I agree that this should be an option.

              The manufacturers have something of a dilemma when it comes to
              sharpening. Images require a little sharpening to account for the
              fuzziness introduced by the scanning process. In theory all images
              produced by a scanner should be slightly sharpened. However, it should
              be optional. The user should be able to determine what is done to the
              image. the user may want to scan without any sharpening so a "raw"
              image is produced. This could be stored and later they may use any
              sharpening tool of their choice (every unsharp mask tool is different
              according to the algorithm, default settings choices, etc.) on the
              image or leave the decision to others at a future time.

              Steve
            • LDYTRAMP
              Susan go to Hp Scanning and set the scanning values you like. Then bring up the pull down menu under Scan on that page, pick Scan Profile then Save Profile.
              Message 6 of 9 , Oct 31, 2005
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                Susan go to Hp Scanning and set the scanning values you like. Then
                bring up the pull down menu under Scan on that page, pick Scan
                Profile then Save Profile. Give it a name and save it. Now go to
                the HP Director home page (where you can pick Sacn Picture, Scan
                Doc. etc) bring up the pull down menu under Settings pick Setting &
                Preferences then Button Setting. On that page towards the bottom is
                a button Modify Scan Picture Settings click on that then click in
                the box to pick scan profile and pick the one that you just saved
                and click on the apply buttom. This should fix your problem
                according to my help notes.

                --- In genphoto@yahoogroups.com, "Susan B. Farmer" <sfarmer@g...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Quoting LDYTRAMP <ldytramp@y...>:
                >
                > > I don't know about a HP 3500 but my HP 4070 comes with a HP
                Director
                > > that is loaded to my desk top where I can set all of my settings
                and
                > > they are kept for all of the photo's that I'm scanning for a
                complet
                > > session of scanning.
                > > If I scan using the quick button on the front of the scanner I
                have
                > > to set the settings for each picture.
                > > Not sure if this is the problem with your 3500 but it could be if
                > > that is the way that you are scanning.
                > > I've used HP scanners for years and have been very happy.
                >
                > This one has the director as well -- but the "sharpen" defaults to
                > "medium" with every image. I did manage to make it scan everyting
                at
                > 300 dpi and safe as a .tif file, but I don't want the software
                deciding
                > what I do and don't want sharpened.
                >
                > *sigh*
                >
                > susan
                > -----
                > Susan Farmer
                > sfarmer@g...
                > University of Tennessee
                > Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
                > http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
                >
              • Susan B. Farmer
                ... The awful thing is that I ve done all that. Sharpening isn t one of the things that can be set and kept in a profile -- so it still has to be done every
                Message 7 of 9 , Oct 31, 2005
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                  Quoting LDYTRAMP <ldytramp@...>:

                  > Susan go to Hp Scanning and set the scanning values you like. Then
                  > bring up the pull down menu under Scan on that page, pick Scan
                  > Profile then Save Profile. Give it a name and save it. Now go to
                  > the HP Director home page (where you can pick Sacn Picture, Scan
                  > Doc. etc) bring up the pull down menu under Settings pick Setting &
                  > Preferences then Button Setting. On that page towards the bottom is
                  > a button Modify Scan Picture Settings click on that then click in
                  > the box to pick scan profile and pick the one that you just saved
                  > and click on the apply buttom. This should fix your problem
                  > according to my help notes.
                  >

                  The awful thing is that I've done all that. Sharpening isn't one of the
                  things that can be set and kept in a profile -- so it still has to be
                  done every picture. It *does* however, remember that I want things
                  scanned at 300 dpi and saved as a .tif file, so that's something!

                  I'll check when I get home tonight, and try and re-save a profile and
                  see if it makes any difference -- on the off chance that I saved before
                  I realized that sharpening wasn't set. Loose nut on the keyboard and
                  all that .....

                  Susan
                  -----
                  Susan Farmer
                  sfarmer@...
                  University of Tennessee
                  Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
                  http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
                • Historic Photo Archive
                  I have found that any automatic setting guarantees the result will not be publication quality. If it is possible to disable all scanner adjustments made by
                  Message 8 of 9 , Oct 31, 2005
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                    I have found that any "automatic" setting guarantees the result will not be
                    publication quality. If it is possible to disable all scanner adjustments
                    made by the scanner driver, and just use it to run the motor and lamp, then
                    you will get a raw file. I scan everything in the high bit mode (16 bit
                    greyscale or 48 bit rgb) because vintage photos are often faded or need work
                    and there is not enough information in the 8 bit mode to avoid banding.

                    Some scanner drivers cannot be run like this, in which case you need a
                    professional driver, such as Vuescan. I use this often.

                    Once I have a raw file, I open in Photoshop. To set the levels (high and low
                    point) I use "levels". When the dialogue box opens, I hold down the command
                    & option keys (I am on Mac, similar keys on Windows & Linux) and the screen
                    turns blank. While holding down these keys, I move the low value slider in
                    the levels, and as I move it the screen will display only the clipped
                    pixels. I go to where pixels in the image area clip, then back off
                    slightly. Repeat for high values. Then I take my hands off the command &
                    option keys and move the mid point slider to the point where the image is
                    well balanced between light and dark tones. I never sharpen. This image is
                    now processed, and you may do some dodging and burning. I do most of that
                    with the history erase tool, set my brush at about 5% and tame the most
                    contrasty sections of the image. I save as a tif in the high bit mode, and
                    it is publication quality.

                    Hope this helps
                    --
                    Thomas Robinson
                    http://www.historicphotoarchive.com
                  • Steve Knoblock
                    ... I have always found this to be true working with vintage photographs. For some reason, albumen prints from the 19th century need more headroom than
                    Message 9 of 9 , Oct 31, 2005
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                      >greyscale or 48 bit rgb) because vintage photos are often faded or need work
                      >and there is not enough information in the 8 bit mode to avoid banding.

                      I have always found this to be true working with vintage photographs.
                      For some reason, albumen prints from the 19th century need more
                      "headroom" than ordinary black and white. Even a small change in
                      lightness or contrast seems to affect albumen or sepia tone images (I
                      am not sure about sepia toned black and white images or neutral toned
                      prints from the 19th century). One explanation is they have more open
                      shadows, perhaps a wider dynamic range. Several years ago this came up
                      on the list, but no real answer was settled on.

                      Steve
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