Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [genphoto] Daguerrotypes

Expand Messages
  • John C. Jernigan
    It is possible to restore these images using Adobe Photoshop. The degree of success would depend on how badly the original was degraded. Best regards (again)
    Message 1 of 5 , May 13, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      It is possible to restore these images using Adobe Photoshop. The degree
      of success would depend on how badly the original was degraded.
      Best regards (again)
      John J.

      Dol Sol wrote:

      >Is there any hope for daguerrotypes that are either faded or somehow turned
      >black? Does certain equipment bring out hidden images, or can I try to
      >clean them? Yes, I realize I'm probably dreaming.
      >
      >-- Delaware Dolores
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >GenPhoto http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genphoto/
      >Post message: genphoto@yahoogroups.com
      >Subscribe: genphoto-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >Unsubscribe: genphoto-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >IT MAY TAKE SOME TIME BEFORE MAIL STOPS! ASK YAHOO ABOUT IT! NOT ME!
      >Please do not try to contact me at the Yahoo Groups list owner address, use editor@...
      >
      >Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Historic Photo Archive
      The restoration of daguerreoptypes that have faded is best done by copying. This is difficult since you are in fact photographing a mirror. It is done with a
      Message 2 of 5 , May 13, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        The restoration of daguerreoptypes that have faded is best done by copying.
        This is difficult since you are in fact photographing a mirror. It is done
        with a view camera, where the front standard can rise, so the camera can
        look at the dag without reflecting itself. You build a black tent around
        the lens and dag, and light from the sides, and shoot with cross-polarized
        light. The resulting 4x5 transparency is scanned and the restoration done
        in photoshop.

        For many years, recommendations were published about a wet treatment for
        cleaning daguerreotypes using thiourea, commonly marketed as Tarn-X and
        similar products. This has have been found to be very harmful to the image
        over time and is no longer recommended.

        A book was published by Smithsonian conservators that is the best source of
        information about dag conservation, it is called "The Daguerreotype:
        Nineteenth Century Technology and Modern Science" by M. Susan Barger and
        William B. White, perhaps your local library has or can get you this book.

        In short, make no attempt to open the dag and do anything without some study
        and practice. Do not use a tissue, brush, or anything to clean the surface
        because it will scratch the image permanently. Do not use compressed air to
        blow the dust off it, the air will blow the image right off it. A
        daguerreotype is extremely fragile.

        I can recommend a professional photo conservator if you need, he is the
        curator of photography at the art museum here. there is an email group of
        professional photo conservation technicians that you can check out, it is
        photoconservation@yahoogroups

        As to the print blocks, they are very sturdy and you don't have to worry
        about the ink damaging them. Take them to an old-time printer who uses
        letterpress. They can print them. You scan the print they make. Since
        they are half-tone, there will be a moire pattern in your scan. Don't use
        the "descreen" option in the scanner driver if you have Photoshop. Scan it
        straight and then get rid of the moire by opening the image in PS and using
        Filter/Blur/Gaussian Blur. You can see exactly how much to use for your
        particular image. Usually it is about 1.6 to 2.

        Good luck

        --
        Thomas Robinson
        http://www.historicphotoarchive.com
      • Paul Reiser (Contractor)
        Yes, I agree - you would be surprised at how much can be recovered from a seemingly useless dguerrotype using a good scanner and photoshop. Paul R.
        Message 3 of 5 , May 15, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Yes, I agree - you would be surprised at how much can be recovered from a
          seemingly useless dguerrotype using a good scanner and photoshop.

          Paul R.

          >
          >It is possible to restore these images using Adobe Photoshop. The degree
          >of success would depend on how badly the original was degraded.
          >Best regards (again)
          >John J.
          >
          >Dol Sol wrote:
          >
          >>Is there any hope for daguerrotypes that are either faded or somehow turned
          >>black? Does certain equipment bring out hidden images, or can I try to
          >>clean them? Yes, I realize I'm probably dreaming.
        • Historic Photo Archive
          If you are going to scan the dag and have photoshop full version (rather than elements) you would do well to scan at 16 bit, since the contrast range is so
          Message 4 of 5 , May 17, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            If you are going to scan the dag and have photoshop full version (rather
            than elements) you would do well to scan at 16 bit, since the contrast range
            is so short, you will avoid banding if your scanner driver can deliver 16
            bit to PS and then set the levels. To set levels in photoshop (after vers
            6) hold down the two keys to the left of the space bar while you move the
            cursor to the high and low points. The screen will be blank until you clip
            and then the screen will show only the clipping. This is the best way I
            know to scan a short-scale image without clipping and banding.

            --
            Thomas Robinson
            http://www.historicphotoarchive.com

            > Yes, I agree - you would be surprised at how much can be recovered from a
            > seemingly useless dguerrotype using a good scanner and photoshop.
            >
            > Paul R.
            >
            >>
            >> It is possible to restore these images using Adobe Photoshop. The degree
            >> of success would depend on how badly the original was degraded.
            >> Best regards (again)
            >> John J.
            >>
            >> Dol Sol wrote:
            >>
            >>> Is there any hope for daguerrotypes that are either faded or somehow turned
            >>> black? Does certain equipment bring out hidden images, or can I try to
            >>> clean them? Yes, I realize I'm probably dreaming.
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.