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Re: [genphoto] Scans

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  • E.Rodier
    How much is too much would be a better question. I ve had some requests to resize 1 mb pictures that people received as e-mail attachments. Consider how many
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 14, 2004
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      How much is "too much" would be a better question. I've had some requests to
      resize 1 mb pictures that people received as e-mail attachments.

      Consider how many pictures you want to organize on one CD (about 600 mb) or
      one DVD. What size image files will your relatives be able to view and
      print?

      A working photographer using film had photographed a bride outdoors with a
      black fly on her white sleeve. The 8x10 picture was scanned, black fly
      "removed" using a 486 computer and the new image about 1.2 mb JPG saved on a
      floppy. The photographer went home and couldn't print the file on his new
      non-Windows computer. He came back to pick up a new copy of the picture
      printed with a much less expensive Windows computer system. -- Elizabeth

      ----- Original Message -----
      > It has probably been posted many times before, what should my scan setting
      be for the best scans? My home scanner will scan to 600 dpi; my work
      scanner, to 1200 dpi. How much is enough?
    • Ruth
      I have been scanning at 200 dpi if I want something to print the same size that it actually is in dimensions. But I adjust my scans for quality by the size of
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 14, 2004
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        I have been scanning at 200 dpi if I want something to print the same size that
        it actually is in dimensions. But I adjust my scans for quality by the size of
        the photo. For very small photos, I scan at 600 or 1200, depending on whether I
        have one person in a photo or several. The more people in a picture, the higher
        resolution I want. I usually will bring down the borders to scan each person
        individually, too, for better resolution on each face.

        I hope this is not too confusing. Scanning for old family photos should be higher
        than usual, in my experience, because when I do clean-up and repair on them with
        my software, it reduces kbs of the photo.

        Ruth
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Susan Farmer" <sfarmer@...>
        To: <genphoto@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, August 14, 2004 9:25 PM
        Subject: Re: [genphoto] Scans


        > >
        > > It has probably been posted many times before, what should my scan setting be
        for the best scans? My home scanner will scan to 600 dpi; my work scanner, to
        1200 dpi. How much is enough?
        >
        > I scan everything at 300 dpi -- except for negatives/slides. This will
        > give you a size-to-size copy. I.e., if you scan a 3.5x5" photo at 300
        > dpi, you can take the file to your local WallyWorld and have a 3.5x5
        > photo printed from that file. If you want a larger photo, scan at a
        > higher density. Also, for maximum quality, save your image as a .tif
        > file *NOT* a .jpg
        >
        > Susan
        > -----
        > Susan Baker Farmer
        > sfarmer@...
        > http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Genealogy
        > VA/KY: Austin, Baker, Carico, Damron, Gentry, Henegar, Horn, Kilgore,
        > Lambert, Lane, Maynard, McPeek, Stallard, Wells
        > TN: Farmer, Haskins, Russell Wright
        > AL/GA: Baker, Childers, Minton, Owens, Rousseau, Swords, Vance
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > GenPhoto http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genphoto/
        > Post message: genphoto@yahoogroups.com
        > Subscribe: genphoto-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > Unsubscribe: genphoto-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > IT MAY TAKE SOME TIME BEFORE MAIL STOPS! ASK YAHOO ABOUT IT! NOT ME!
        > Please do not try to contact me at the Yahoo Groups list owner address, use
        editor@...
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Susan Farmer
        ... I scan everything at 300 dpi -- except for negatives/slides. This will give you a size-to-size copy. I.e., if you scan a 3.5x5 photo at 300 dpi, you can
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 14, 2004
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          >
          > It has probably been posted many times before, what should my scan setting be for the best scans? My home scanner will scan to 600 dpi; my work scanner, to 1200 dpi. How much is enough?

          I scan everything at 300 dpi -- except for negatives/slides. This will
          give you a size-to-size copy. I.e., if you scan a 3.5x5" photo at 300
          dpi, you can take the file to your local WallyWorld and have a 3.5x5
          photo printed from that file. If you want a larger photo, scan at a
          higher density. Also, for maximum quality, save your image as a .tif
          file *NOT* a .jpg

          Susan
          -----
          Susan Baker Farmer
          sfarmer@...
          http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Genealogy
          VA/KY: Austin, Baker, Carico, Damron, Gentry, Henegar, Horn, Kilgore,
          Lambert, Lane, Maynard, McPeek, Stallard, Wells
          TN: Farmer, Haskins, Russell Wright
          AL/GA: Baker, Childers, Minton, Owens, Rousseau, Swords, Vance
        • Historic Photo Archive
          When you scan, the measurement is ppi (pixels per inch) When you print, the measurement is dpi (dots per inch) Often these terms are mixed up, it is not
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 15, 2004
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            When you scan, the measurement is ppi (pixels per inch)
            When you print, the measurement is dpi (dots per inch)

            Often these terms are mixed up, it is not uncommon to see scanner software
            drivers use "dpi" incorrectly. It is a good idea to keep the concept of dpi
            and ppi in mind when thinking and deciding.

            So when you want to make an 8x10" print at 300 dpi, you need to scan the
            original at a ppi that will yield 300dpi when it is enlarged.

            Tom Robinson
          • Ruth
            Thanks for your posts. I learn a lot from them. Ruth ... From: Historic Photo Archive To: Sent:
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 15, 2004
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              Thanks for your posts. I learn a lot from them.

              Ruth
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Historic Photo Archive" <tom@...>
              To: <genphoto@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Sunday, August 15, 2004 3:36 PM
              Subject: [genphoto] Re: Scans


              > When you scan, the measurement is ppi (pixels per inch)
              > When you print, the measurement is dpi (dots per inch)
              >
              > Often these terms are mixed up, it is not uncommon to see scanner software
              > drivers use "dpi" incorrectly. It is a good idea to keep the concept of dpi
              > and ppi in mind when thinking and deciding.
              >
              > So when you want to make an 8x10" print at 300 dpi, you need to scan the
              > original at a ppi that will yield 300dpi when it is enlarged.
              >
              > Tom Robinson
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > GenPhoto http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genphoto/
              > Post message: genphoto@yahoogroups.com
              > Subscribe: genphoto-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > Unsubscribe: genphoto-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > IT MAY TAKE SOME TIME BEFORE MAIL STOPS! ASK YAHOO ABOUT IT! NOT ME!
              > Please do not try to contact me at the Yahoo Groups list owner address, use
              editor@...
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Historic Photo Archive
              The best way to decide what size to email a photo is to ask the recipient how large they want to print it and at what resolution. For example, they want a 6
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 15, 2004
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                The best way to decide what size to email a photo is to ask the recipient
                how large they want to print it and at what resolution. For example, they
                want a 6" wide photo to print at 300dpi. You take your tif image, resize to
                6"@300dpi, save as a jpg, and email as an attachment. That way you always
                give them exactly what they want.

                All photographers use jpg for email and tif for storage. A jpg is much
                smaller than a tif. a jpg can be emailed, and for all practical purposes a
                tif cannot be emailed. jpg images cannot be re-sized without severe
                deterioration of the image, which is why you want to send jpg files at the
                size they will actually be used as (because if they change the size it will
                deteriorate the image).

                Some ISPs, notably AOL, have filters that sometimes create problems when
                emailing photos. If the recipient of your photo is on AOL and is having
                difficulty, try emailing to their work or an alternate ISP address.

                The current industry standard size used by professional photographers for
                scans is around 60mb tif. this is what "stock agencies", which are the
                agents who sell photographers work, request. This file size is about what
                you would get from a 4000ppi scan of a medium format negative or slide film.
                (Images made with digital cameras, rather than film, contain much more image
                information in about a third of the file size.)

                For scanning originals size 5x7 or smaller, I scan at the maximum possible
                ppi (my flatbed does 1800ppi, my slide scanner does 4000ppi). I store my
                scans on hard drives. A 160 gig external hard drive in a generic case costs
                about $80 now, which is cheaper and more permanent than burning CDs, so cost
                is not a consideration when deciding file size anymore. You might as well
                have the extra quality.

                Tom Robinson
              • Carl Mautz
                Hi Tom - I just read your message to this list. Nice to hear you re still kickin . Carl
                Message 7 of 8 , Aug 15, 2004
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                  Hi Tom -

                  I just read your message to this list. Nice to hear you're still kickin'.

                  Carl
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