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Scanning a negative

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  • Kaitlain
    I ve just recently come across a box full of old negatives. Is there a way that I can scan them? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Kaitlain Life
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 3 1:10 AM
      I've just recently come across a box full of old negatives. Is there a way that I can scan them?

      Any help would be greatly appreciated.

      Thanks,

      Kaitlain




      "Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we're here, we might as well dance...."
      Sharon Dunbaugh Allen

      http://www.geocities.com/kaitlain


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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Susan Farmer
      ... You have to have either a film scanner or a flatbed with a transparency adaptor (usually a transparency lid). susan
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 3 6:43 PM
        > I've just recently come across a box full of old negatives. Is there a way that I can scan them?
        >
        > Any help would be greatly appreciated.

        You have to have either a film scanner or a flatbed with a transparency
        adaptor (usually a transparency lid).

        susan
      • Rstarthistle@wmconnect.com
        Or if you have time but not alot of money, go to www.rootsweb.com and find their newsletter archives. back sometime in the spring of this year someone was
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 3 9:48 PM
          Or if you have time but not alot of money, go to www.rootsweb.com and find
          their newsletter archives. back sometime in the spring of this year someone was
          talking about how they made a "backlight" for use on a regular flatbed scanner
          that this person claimed worked well. I've not tried it by the way.

          Rhonda


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Historic Photo Archive
          the do it yourself transparency adapter is a waste of time. If you want a full explanation, let me know. ... Good scanners are so cheap now that you might as
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 4 9:30 AM
            the do it yourself transparency adapter is a waste of time. If you want a
            full explanation, let me know.
            > Or if you have time but not alot of money, go to www.rootsweb.com and find
            > their newsletter archives. back sometime in the spring of this year someone
            > was
            > talking about how they made a "backlight" for use on a regular flatbed scanner
            > that this person claimed worked well. I've not tried it by the way.

            Good scanners are so cheap now that you might as well buy a good one. There
            are a ton on ebay. For negatives, the important spec is the dpi (or ppi).
            It needs to be 1200 at least for large negatives, and more if you have small
            negatives like 35mm. If you have 35mm negatives, the best and lowest cost
            option is a used Polaroid SS4000 which goes for a few hundred used.

            You will want to join a scanner group on the internet so you can ask
            questions, there will be many when you get started.

            Best of luck.
            Tom Robinson
          • JackH12345@aol.com
            I recently bought a flatbed scanner, Epson Perfection 3170. I wanted high-resolution slide and negative scanner and didn t like the high prices of the
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 4 12:08 PM
              I recently bought a flatbed scanner, Epson Perfection 3170. I wanted
              high-resolution slide and negative scanner and didn't like the high prices of the
              dedicated film scanners.

              Then I found a very favorable review of the 3170 online at the PC World
              magazine site. It has performed beautifully. I was amazed at the quality for such
              a cheap scanner..I paid about $180.

              Take a look at it. I saw recently that Epson may have a new updated scanner
              like it.

              Jack Hotz
              San Diego


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Bonnie
              I have used a do it yourself method, and it was very simple and very economical and I got great results! I used a light box (around 10-20$ -- sold at most
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 5 1:06 PM
                I have used a "do it yourself" method, and it was very simple and very
                economical and I got great results! I used a light box (around 10-20$ --
                sold at most scrapbooking stores and craft stores like Joann's or Michaels
                (see 20-50% off discount coupons in each Sunday's paper for more savings)
                and used the macro setting on my Nikon digital camera. you could use a
                tripod to have a steadier hand, but I didn't even do that. The light table
                is great for also sorting slides and negatives if you don't want to invest
                in the expensive kits that let you stack up the negatives on little
                stands/rows. It's also portable so if your "great aunt Suzy" has negatives
                but won't let you take them, you can photograph them right there on the
                spot.

                I'd recommend "framing" the negative with black paper to keep the bright
                light from the light table from affecting your exposure settings, or use a
                backlight feature if your camera has one.

                I'm all for using the best on the market, but if you're pinched for pennies,
                you should consider this unless you definitely want a new scanner.

                just my 2 cents,

                Bonnie Schroader
                Surprise, AZ
                the do it yourself transparency adapter is a waste of time. If you want a
                full explanation, let me know.
                > Or if you have time but not alot of money, go to www.rootsweb.com and
                find
                > their newsletter archives. back sometime in the spring of this year
                someone
                > was
                > talking about how they made a "backlight" for use on a regular flatbed
                scanner
                > that this person claimed worked well. I've not tried it by the way.


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Historic Photo Archive
                Hello, Bonnie Schroader has brought up the subject of using a digital camera (rather than a scanner) to copy negatives. I do a lot of both, and here is my
                Message 7 of 8 , Aug 6 10:29 AM
                  Hello, Bonnie Schroader has brought up the subject of using a digital camera
                  (rather than a scanner) to copy negatives. I do a lot of both, and here is
                  my experience.

                  If you have a large number of negatives and want to see what is on them, the
                  digital camera and light table is very effective to get access copies for
                  evaluation. I can shoot about 90 of these an hour. You will get reasonable
                  quality copies, and can digitize a complete collection very quickly at
                  practically no cost.

                  The top problem you may encounter is the reflection of your digital camera
                  lens on the negative you are copying. I agree with using a mask around the
                  negative to block stray light. I also use black paper in front of the
                  camera, with a hole cut out for the lens. this eliminates 90% of the
                  problem.

                  If you have photoshop, you can use a batch action to process all your
                  images. You can invert them from negative to positive and adjust contrast
                  on one picture, and then apply this to all the photos in a file on your
                  computer. You can process hundreds of photos in just a few minutes
                  automatically.

                  The result is suitable for making CDs to send to relatives, or web hosting,
                  or making small prints on a desktop printer.

                  If you want to make quality copies, you will need to scan them. Scanning is
                  very time consuming. The digital camera idea is great for sorting through
                  all your images and deciding which ones to put the time into.

                  One more thought is that you can set the digital camera to number the images
                  and start at 0001. If you can get an old Bates automatic numbering machine,
                  widely available at thrift stores, garage sales, or ebay, you can buy new
                  negative envelopes and use the numbering machine to number your new
                  envelopes (this is basically a big rubber stamp designed for making serial
                  numbers, every time you stamp an envelope it changes the number up one) And
                  this will make it very easy to come up with a complete catalog of your
                  negatives.

                  I do this service professionally and do thousands of negatives every week,
                  it is the best, fastest, and lowest cost way to get intellectual control and
                  access copies of entire collections.

                  Once you do all this, you can use a computer to enter information about each
                  image. You will create a searchable database that serves as an index to the
                  collection. You can then use your computer printer to print the caption on
                  each new envelope. Your collection will be in good shape to pass on down
                  the family. HOw often do you run into people who get old family photos and
                  have no idea who anybody in the pictures is or what they are doing. (that is
                  what happened to me) This system is the best way I know to lock the caption
                  information with the image permanently.

                  Hope this helps and good luck.

                  Tom robinson
                • Historic Photo Archive
                  as a follow-up to the post about using a digital camera to copy negatives, yesterday I copied 235 glass plate 4x5 negatives in three hours and fifteen
                  Message 8 of 8 , Aug 7 11:12 AM
                    as a follow-up to the post about using a digital camera to copy negatives,
                    yesterday I copied 235 glass plate 4x5" negatives in three hours and fifteen
                    minutes. The batch action processing of the images took about 40 minutes
                    (of unattended operation in the computer). The digital copies are 2048 x
                    1356 pixels. The files can make a nice 300 dpi print about the size of your
                    average drugstore photofinishing print. The camera automatically numbered
                    them starting at 0001. They will go into new envelopes with these numbers,
                    and the original envelopes will also be numbered (using the Bates automatic
                    numbering machine).

                    Costs were $90 for shooting, $30.55 for new archival envelopes, and $60 for
                    numbering and re-sleeving.

                    By comparison, if the customer had wanted prints made in the darkroom it
                    would have cost $1762.50 alone. Or, alternately, scanning the collection
                    would have taken weeks of work. So this is very efficient way to achieve
                    intellectual control, access copies, and inventory a collection.

                    Tom Robinson
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