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Costs

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  • Arleen
    Has anyone an idea of the cost of having pictures taken in a studio. I am mostly interested in 1890-1910 both here, USA and in Europe. Also I have some
    Message 1 of 4 , May 13, 2004
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      Has anyone an idea of the cost of having pictures taken in a studio. I
      am mostly interested in 1890-1910 both here, USA and in Europe. Also I
      have some pictures from Europe that appear to be studio but as you study
      them closely you can see they were taken outside. It looks like the
      photographer carried a canvas backdrop with him that he would hang on
      the side of a house, barn, whatever and then pose those in the picture.

      Someone on this list must know these answers.
      AR


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    • wilburd@webtv.net
      The price of studio photography back at the turn of the last Century would probably depend on the location of the studio or as was the case the traveling
      Message 2 of 4 , May 13, 2004
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        The price of studio photography back at the turn of the last Century
        would probably depend on the location of the studio or as was the case
        the traveling studio. The best way to determine the cost would be to
        look a the city directories from that time period and look at their
        adds.

        Wilbur D. Russell
        1015 South 4th
        Leavenworth Ks.66048-3410
        Pho 913/651-5662 QUE SERA SERA
        http://community.webtv.net/wilburd/SLLUGseniorLansing
        MAY THE SOURCE BE WITH YOU
      • HDMShort@aol.com
        AR: In Milton, North Dakota a photographer named George Homme sold 4x8 inch photograph for $6.00 per dozen. Photographer John MacCarthy moved to Milton in 1901
        Message 3 of 4 , May 13, 2004
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          AR:
          In Milton, North Dakota a photographer named George Homme sold 4x8 inch
          photograph for $6.00 per dozen. Photographer John MacCarthy moved to Milton in 1901
          but no prices for his goods was found. I have some of his photos of my wife's
          grand parents. This information was in the old Milton Globe between 1888 and
          1909. There was also a photographer named E. H. Andrews in Edmore in the early
          1900s.

          Harry


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        • HPA
          the period from 1890-1910 was one of dramatic price swings for photographers. The invention of bromide paper, the 1893 depression that drove many
          Message 4 of 4 , May 14, 2004
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            the period from 1890-1910 was one of dramatic price swings for
            photographers. The invention of bromide paper, the 1893 depression that
            drove many photographers out of business, the development of focal plane
            shutters, gaslight papers, real photo postcards (1907) and very unstable
            prices for the gold chloride used in toning are factors. I discuss the
            economics of professional photography during this exact period time
            extensively in my biography of Benjamin Gifford, "Oregon Then & Now"
            Westcliffe publishers, perhaps available through your library (pardon the
            shameless self promotion)

            Price wars in larger cities were rampant, a casual reading of contemporary
            photography magazines will show.

            For single images, tintypes were used. Negatives were made if the customer
            wanted a dozen or more. The negative was usually retouched at no extra
            charge, but the quality of the work determined whether a photographer was on
            the low or high end of the price scale.

            Browsing through my index of all Oregon photographer advertisements for this
            era, cabinet cards were going for $1.50 to $3 per dozen (negative size was
            4.25" x 6.5"), CDVs were about half that, and life size hand colored were
            $10-$25 each.

            The entire text of "Oregon Photographers 1852-1917" is a free download off
            my website. This is a pretty big file, it prints in about 750 pages. You
            can search for "$" and see hundreds of original advertisements quoted
            verbatim (of course you are going to see a lot of other stuff too)
            here it is:
            http://historicphotoarchive.com/stuff/opnorph.html

            good luck
            Tom Robinson
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