Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [genphoto] Archival Printer

Expand Messages
  • Stephen Oddy
    Hi Marilyn I also thought of buying a good quality printer at $800 Australian, plus paper and ink. The cost would be well over $1000.00. The cost of having
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 13, 2003
      Hi Marilyn

      I also thought of buying a good quality printer at $800 Australian, plus paper and ink.
      The cost would be well over $1000.00.
      The cost of having them done at a photo shop is $1.50 each if you get 6 or more done at once.
      $1.50 into $1000.0 is 666 photos, and the photo shop photos are on thicker paper and have some sort of
      clear coating over the ink and are better.

      I decided to spend some of the money on a CD burner instead.

      Stephen
      Hillarys
      Western Australia

      Marilyn Hesse wrote:

      > I too am ready to buy a good archival printer, but have put it off
      > because it's so complicated. I am making heritage albums for my
      > children - and grandchildren and great-grandchildren. I have the
      > photos but would like to do the captions and journaling with my
      > printer. I look forward to some good advice on this subject.
      >
      > Marilyn Mills Hesse
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "Jann G" <jann_grimes@...>
      > To: <genphoto@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Thursday, March 13, 2003 8:21 AM
      > Subject: [genphoto] Archival Printer
      >
      > > I am ready to think about buying an archival printer. Can someone
      > tell me
      > > anything about them? What is the #1 printer for archival printing?
      > I know
      > > about the $700-$800 Epson printer, but what about dye sub
      > printers? Or color
      > > laser (expensive!). I am totally confused. I read about dye sub,
      > but my
      > > sister who works in the industry says they fade quickly.
      > >
      > > I don't want my prints to last 40 years, I want them to last
      > longer than
      > > that. I want to know my GREAT grandchildren will be able to see
      > them one
      > > day.
      > >
      > > I am not only the family historian/genealogist, I also scrapbook.
      > At this
      > > point I only use my laser printer to make things for scrapbooking.
      > I would
      > > really love to use color, as well as the thousands of color
      > graphics I have
      > > collected.
      > >
      > > I am also hoping to scan antique photographs and be able to share
      > those I
      > > have collected over the years. I am not talking about scanning to
      > disk. I
      > > know that is an option, but I would like to print out photographs
      > and know
      > > they are the best they can be. It just seems like something should
      > be out
      > > there that would make these things last.
      > >
      > > I have post cards that are more than 100 years old and most of the
      > look
      > > great as far as the color goes. I know nothing about printing, but
      > what were
      > > these printed with that made them last so long?
      > >
      > > Any ideas, web page suggestions, etc. welcome.
      > >
      > > Sincerely,
      > > Jann
      > >
      > >
      > > GenPhoto http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genphoto/
      > > Post message: genphoto@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subscribe: genphoto-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > > Unsubscribe: genphoto-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > > IT MAY TAKE SOME TIME BEFORE MAIL STOPS! ASK YAHOO ABOUT IT! NOT
      > ME!
      > > Please do not try to contact me at the Yahoo Groups list owner
      > address, use editor@...
      > >
      > >
      > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      > >
      > >
      >
      > GenPhoto http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genphoto/
      > Post message: genphoto@yahoogroups.com
      > Subscribe: genphoto-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > Unsubscribe: genphoto-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > IT MAY TAKE SOME TIME BEFORE MAIL STOPS! ASK YAHOO ABOUT IT! NOT ME!
      > Please do not try to contact me at the Yahoo Groups list owner address, use editor@...
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
    • HPA
      I think the new digital printers are great, and the better inks will deliver a more permanent print than any color chemical print generally available and I
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 13, 2003
        I think the new digital printers are great, and the better inks will deliver
        a more permanent print than any color chemical print generally available and
        I would encourage anyone interested in quality printing to go this
        direction. Having said that, digital printing does get complicated. The
        biggest problem is getting a color printer to make black and white prints.
        Since colors are used in equal blends to produce gray highlights, the color
        balance must be exact. This is nearly impossible because of metamarism.
        This means that color inks change their appearance depending on whether it
        is viewed in daylight or artificial light. These prints look a bit green
        under a lamp and a bit purple under daylight. Many people will never notice
        this difference, or will readily accept it for what it is, but it is
        noticeable. Photographers who want dead-on straight black and white
        generally buy a second printer and load it with custom inks (usually black
        and several shades of gray). One good workaround that may be useful to the
        members of this particular list is to print black & white as sepia. the
        photoshop default "sepia" works great with the 2200 and Lepp's profile (see
        below for download).

        I have the Epson 2200, which is one of the the standard archival printers
        used by photographers. There is several other Epson models too. To the
        best of my knowledge, no other manufacturer except Cannon has archival
        printers under $1000. The best source of independent testing information
        about life expectancy ratings is http://www.wilhelm-research.com/ Also,
        many list members of the groups mentioned below conduct their own
        accelerated aging tests, check the archives.

        I recommend this as the best overall printer group for digital photo
        printing:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Epson2000P/

        The group that discusses making black and white digital prints is
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/DigitalBlackandWhiteThePrint/
        Most of these people buy a stock printer, and then from a third party buy
        ink and cartridges, sometimes this requires modification of the printer, and
        special software.

        It is expected that Epson will issue a new RIP next month that may clear
        this up somewhat (or may not). The new model Epson printer with new inks
        is probably coming out in November, and it is widely expected that may
        control metamerism to a greater degree. Some of the smaller epson printers
        offer "black only", which is to say the black & white print is printed with
        only the one ink. they look allright, you could hang them in a restaurant,
        but they are substandard photo quality and a comparison will show you the
        enormous difference.

        After spending the last year reading all of the lists, and trying everything
        i could, I would recommend to the members of this list the Epson 2200 with
        Epson Heavyweight Matte paper, and the Epson matte black ink (not photo
        black). If your need top quality black & white without metamarism, join the
        fray on the digital black & white list because products are changing weekly.
        You will likely want to consider a Epson modified for quad tone b&w inks.
        For archival purposes, I would stick with only the known archival
        combinations of paper and ink, they must be considered together.

        If you buy a printer, you may need additional software to manage the color.
        Some of the software profiles are now free downloads on the Epson 2000p
        list's files section, and I use them and they are quite good, you would have
        to pay $75-$500 for this kind of software to buy it.

        Best of luck
        --
        Thomas Robinson
      • HDMShort@aol.com
        My scanner went out two or so years ago and now I use my digital camera to copy all my photos. Adobe Photo Shop Elements 2 is very good to caption photos.
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 13, 2003
          My scanner went out two or so years ago and now I use my digital camera to
          copy all my photos. Adobe Photo Shop Elements 2 is very good to caption
          photos.
          Harry
        • Mark
          ... that. I want to know my GREAT grandchildren will be able to see them one ... I know a few folks who have worked their magic with Photoshop and then
          Message 4 of 10 , Mar 13, 2003
            >I don't want my prints to last 40 years, I want them to last longer than
            that. I want to know my GREAT grandchildren will be able to see them one
            >day.

            I know a few folks who have worked their magic with Photoshop and then
            uploaded to Walmart. The print comes to the local store printed on Fuji
            Archival paper, which was projected to have a lifespan >100 years. I
            haven't followed any recent tests, though.

            Cost isn't much. Seems like about 0.30 each (US).

            Mark
          • HDMShort@aol.com
            If there is a COSTCO in your area good color or black and white photos in the JPEG mode can be had for only 14 cents. Walmart works fine also, prints are 29
            Message 5 of 10 , Mar 13, 2003
              If there is a COSTCO in your area good color or black and white photos in the
              JPEG mode can be had for only 14 cents. Walmart works fine also, prints are
              29 cents each. Beats the heck our of all the photo Kiosh the current photo
              mags are touting lately. Two dollars for a 4x6 print is a little heavy.
              Harry
            • HDMShort@aol.com
              I have good luck printing black and white photos on my Epson printer, just tell it to print in black when in the properties mode. Harry
              Message 6 of 10 , Mar 13, 2003
                I have good luck printing black and white photos on my Epson printer, just
                tell it to print in black when in the properties mode.
                Harry
              • Dick and Ginny Martin
                A recent PC magazine article recently made a similar recommendation - take digital photos and upload them to a photo printing site. You can get a lot of photos
                Message 7 of 10 , Mar 26, 2003
                  A recent PC magazine article recently made a similar recommendation -
                  take digital photos and upload them to a photo printing site.
                  You can get a lot of photos for the cost of a photo printer and the
                  never-ending supply of ink cartridges. And the quality is as good
                  or better.
                  I believe I'll be doing this from now on.
                  Dick Martin

                  Mark wrote:
                  >>I don't want my prints to last 40 years, I want them to last longer than
                  >
                  > that. I want to know my GREAT grandchildren will be able to see them one
                  >
                  >>day.
                  >
                  >
                  > I know a few folks who have worked their magic with Photoshop and then
                  > uploaded to Walmart. The print comes to the local store printed on Fuji
                  > Archival paper, which was projected to have a lifespan >100 years. I
                  > haven't followed any recent tests, though.
                  >
                  > Cost isn't much. Seems like about 0.30 each (US).
                  >
                  > Mark
                  >
                  >
                  > GenPhoto http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genphoto/
                  > Post message: genphoto@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subscribe: genphoto-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  > Unsubscribe: genphoto-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  > IT MAY TAKE SOME TIME BEFORE MAIL STOPS! ASK YAHOO ABOUT IT! NOT ME!
                  > Please do not try to contact me at the Yahoo Groups list owner address, use editor@...
                  >
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • HPA
                  Before you use a web printer, check the life expectancy of their prints by asking what kind of paper and ink they use. Many of them are making prints that
                  Message 8 of 10 , Mar 28, 2003
                    Before you use a web printer, check the life expectancy of their prints by
                    asking what kind of paper and ink they use. Many of them are making prints
                    that have less than ten year life before fading (some are less than six
                    months before the least stable color shifts by 15%). The Wilhelm site
                    www.wilhelm-research.com is the best source of life expectancy ratings. He
                    also is the person who supplies the life expectancy ratings to PC magazine,
                    although I am not certain if that is the specific magazine referred to in
                    Dick Martin's post.
                    Tom Robinson
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.