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scanning 1970 matte paper

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  • Susan Farmer
    I m trying to figure out how to get a decent scan from that really coarse (and crappy) matte finish paper that was *so* populat in the 1970s. When I scan at
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 10, 2003
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      I'm trying to figure out how to get a decent scan from that really
      coarse (and crappy) matte finish paper that was *so* populat in
      the 1970s. When I scan at 300 dpi (as I do for all images), I
      get little white blips where the light is eflecting on the
      undulations in the paper. I did a rough count and came up with
      72per inch horizontally -- in alternating rows
      and 120 per inch vertically -- like so ...

      - - - - - - - -
      - - - - - - -

      My scanner (Umax) allows for descreen for magazine and newspaper --
      and I can manually set the descreen values.

      Anybody had any success with scanning this type of paper surface?

      Thanks!
      Susan
      -----
      Susan Baker Farmer
      sfarmer@...
      http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Genealogy/Images
    • Patty Fagan
      Two suggestions for rough surface photos: 1. Rotate the photo 90 degrees and scan again. The direction of the light within some scanners can maximize or
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 12, 2003
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        Two suggestions for rough surface photos:

        1. Rotate the photo 90 degrees and scan again. The direction of the light
        within some scanners can maximize or minimize the pebbly surface. Try all
        four rotations and see what looks best. (Rotation is also a partial remedy
        in scanning wrinkled and torn photographs.)

        2. Some scanner software has an "unsharp" or sharpening setting that is
        "On" as a default. Set it Off. Sharp/unsharp accentuates pebbly
        surfaces. Even on a smooth surface, Unsharp can generate unwanted
        noise. (If you need sharpening, unsharpening or descreening, apply them
        later in an image editing program, where you have some control over the
        magnitude of correction).

        Patty Fagan
        Boston

        >I'm trying to figure out how to get a decent scan from that really
        >coarse (and crappy) matte finish paper that was *so* populat in
        >the 1970s. When I scan at 300 dpi (as I do for all images), I
        >get little white blips where the light is eflecting on the
        >undulations in the paper. I did a rough count and came up with
        >72per inch horizontally -- in alternating rows
        >and 120 per inch vertically -- like so ...
      • Michael Bell
        ... In addition to Patty s suggestion for a 90 degree rotation, I would also suggest scanning the photo rotated 45 degrees on the scanner bed. I ve had some
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 12, 2003
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          Susan Farmer <sfarmer@...> writes:
          >I'm trying to figure out how to get a decent scan from that really
          >coarse (and crappy) matte finish paper that was *so* populat in
          >the 1970s. When I scan at 300 dpi (as I do for all images), I
          >get little white blips where the light is eflecting on the
          >undulations in the paper.

          In addition to Patty's suggestion for a 90 degree rotation, I would
          also suggest scanning the photo rotated 45 degrees on the scanner
          bed. I've had some luck with that.

          If you have access to a copy stand, with a lot of patience in
          adjusting the lights you should be able to reduce most of the
          reflections. A piece of non-glare glass over the photo will help
          too. You can either mount a digital camera on the copy stand or a
          traditional film camera and then scan the resulting negatives or
          prints. I've had a few photos that would just not scan well at
          all, but worked pretty well with a copy stand.

          good luck

          --
          Michael Bell
          MBell@...
        • E.Rodier
          Patty, A great tip that I ve never read before. Used smooth surface paper when we were printing our own BW pictures in a home darkroom and they scan easily.
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 12, 2003
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            Patty,
            A great tip that I've never read before. Used smooth surface paper when we
            were printing our own BW pictures in a home darkroom and they scan easily.
            Sometimes the magazine setting works well for early school or department
            store color portraits.
            Elizabeth

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Patty Fagan"
            > Two suggestions for rough surface photos:
            > 1. Rotate the photo 90 degrees and scan again. The direction of the light
            > within some scanners can maximize or minimize the pebbly surface. Try
            all
            > four rotations and see what looks best. (Rotation is also a partial
            remedy
            > in scanning wrinkled and torn photographs.)
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