Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [genphoto] what file size and type?

Expand Messages
  • Doug Nelson
    Scan so that you ll have a minimum of 150ppi at your final printed size (300 is better). That is, if the original is 4x6, and you want to be able to print a
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 27, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Scan so that you'll have a minimum of 150ppi at your final printed size (300
      is better). That is, if the original is 4x6, and you want to be able to
      print a nice 8x10, that would double the ppi you need (pixels per inch), so
      you'd scan at 300-600ppi. JPG can be used for CD storage as long as you have
      the quality setting set at maximum.

      For the 'keeper' files, TIF would be preferable to JPG. Scan at the highest
      resolution that makes a filesize you can handle easily. 25-50 megs per file
      is not unusual. This will guarantee you can do whatever you'd like with the
      images in the future.

      - Doug Nelson

      ==============================
      http://www.photorehab.com -- Fine Photo Restorations
      http://www.retouchpro.com -- The #1 online community for retouchers and
      restorers





      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: The Bethke's [mailto:bethX3@...]
      > Sent: Wednesday, June 26, 2002 11:17 PM
      > To: genphoto@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [genphoto] what file size and type?
      >
      >
      > What file size and type of file would I use when making a family history
      > photo and stories CD to share with cousins?
      >
      > Is this possible for both on one CD? (I have just purchased a Roxio Easy
      > CD creator program).
      >
      > I would like to get a good enough file size/quality to have a decent
      > printout from a bubblejet printer and look as good as whatever
      > inexpensive printers most folks have.
      >
      > What's an idea, roughly, of how many of said quality of photos could I
      > expect to fit onto 1 CD (700MB)?
      >
      > I also want to scan each photo a 2nd time for a 'keeper' file with the
      > best data/resolution. What file type and dpi would I want to use for
      > this? This would be to keep as a record of the photo in a hard drive.
      > Could this 'best' scan file of a photo be taken to a photo/camera shop
      > and printed as a quality photo? ...or while I have access to these
      > photos should I make a film copy with a 35mm camera?
      >
      > I have just purchased a scanner (a new toy for me) a Microtek 4900 that
      > can scan at 4800 x 2400.
      >
      > Your help will be greatly appreciated by this beginner.
      > Thanks,
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > GenPhoto http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genphoto/
      > Post message: genphoto@yahoogroups.com
      > Subscribe: genphoto-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > Unsubscribe: genphoto-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > IT MAY TAKE SOME TIME BEFORE MAIL STOPS! ASK YAHOO ABOUT IT! NOT ME!
      > Please do not try to contact me at the Yahoo Groups list owner
      > address, use editor@...
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
      >
    • E.Rodier
      Large images are fine for archival size copies printed one page at a time. What size do you recommend for genealogy box charts for wall displays or descendant
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 27, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        Large images are fine for archival size copies printed one page at a time.
        What size do you recommend for genealogy box charts for wall displays or
        descendant charts in book format that could have dozens of images? How about
        genealogy scrapbooks or word processor files with sets of pictures and
        source documents?

        Some researchers keep four copies of each image -- archival, family
        scrapbook, web and thumbnail sizes. Some owners of older digital cameras
        were quite happy with life size posters printed from TIF files converted
        from 900 kb JPG. A newer digital camera might be 3.25" x 2.75" x .75" with a
        3x Optical Zoom.

        One option is to crop parts of source images, for example the household
        names and main details from an oversize census page printed from microfilm.
        That way relatives can see the handwriting from 1861 - 1901 Ontario and make
        their own evaluation of the spelling of the family names. Location and page
        details can be included in the caption.

        One person had to use the master document feature of her word processor
        because a family book with pictures could not be printed from a single word
        processor file. Other researchers use page holders for multiple word
        processor files for picture pages.

        How many pictures could be included in a box chart or word processor file if
        the originals were 4x6 and scanned at 600ppi? My older printer used to shut
        down in the middle of a picture if I tried to print too many pages at once.

        A typical family book page (using Word or similar) is about 6 inches wide
        and 8 inches high. I've never attempted to print more than 50 pictures with
        a single Word 2000 file, so that meant splitting a book into four files of a
        few chapters each. Two pictures per page with detailed captions was probably
        the most common layout.
        Elizabeth

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Doug Nelson"
        > Scan so that you'll have a minimum of 150ppi at your final printed size
        (300
        > is better). That is, if the original is 4x6, and you want to be able to
        > print a nice 8x10, that would double the ppi you need (pixels per inch),
        so
        > you'd scan at 300-600ppi. JPG can be used for CD storage as long as you
        have
        > the quality setting set at maximum.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.