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Wouldn't this be a bad idea?

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  • pyeattm@baxter.com
    This tip was in my Ancestry Daily News of April 2, 2002. I thought I remembered someone suggesting never to store photos in ziploc bags - and the addition
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 3 6:33 AM
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      This tip was in my 'Ancestry Daily News' of April 2, 2002. I thought I
      remembered someone suggesting never to store photos in ziploc bags - and
      the addition of a chemical packet doesn't sound any better to me. I would
      like to reply to the newsletter if someone can give me good advice to
      share. Here is the text:


      DESICCANT PACKAGES TO SOAK UP MOLD SPORES

      Here's my genealogy quick tip:
      I inherited a treasured box of one-hundred-year old photos.
      Unfortunately, they had been stored badly. Rodents had gotten to
      them, as well as mold and mildew. I coughed and wheezed whenever I
      opened the box to copy these lovely old photographs. I put them
      together in bundles according to families, in zip lock plastic bags.
      Now, whenever I finish a bottle of vitamins, I take the desiccant
      package enclosed in each bottle and put it into each "envelope" of
      photos. It worked magic. Now, I can safely open a bag, take out the
      photo and copy it without feeling ill.
    • Susan B. Farmer
      I don t know why it would be a bad idea. The bags are chemically inert, and they protect the photos from a multitude of hazards. I keep all of mine in
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 3 8:33 AM
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        I don't know why it would be a bad idea. The bags are chemically inert,
        and they protect the photos from a multitude of hazards. I keep all of
        mine in baggies.

        Susan

        >
        >This tip was in my 'Ancestry Daily News' of April 2, 2002. I thought I
        >remembered someone suggesting never to store photos in ziploc bags - and
        >the addition of a chemical packet doesn't sound any better to me. I would
        >like to reply to the newsletter if someone can give me good advice to
        >share. Here is the text:
        >
        >
        >DESICCANT PACKAGES TO SOAK UP MOLD SPORES
        >
        >Here's my genealogy quick tip:
        >I inherited a treasured box of one-hundred-year old photos.
        >Unfortunately, they had been stored badly. Rodents had gotten to
        >them, as well as mold and mildew. I coughed and wheezed whenever I
        >opened the box to copy these lovely old photographs. I put them
        >together in bundles according to families, in zip lock plastic bags.
        >Now, whenever I finish a bottle of vitamins, I take the desiccant
        >package enclosed in each bottle and put it into each "envelope" of
        >photos. It worked magic. Now, I can safely open a bag, take out the
        >photo and copy it without feeling ill.
        >
      • HDMShort@aol.com
        Hi: Enjoyed you storage tip for old photos. I would like to suggest, however, you use archival storage bags made of poly carbonate material rather then plastic
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 3 9:24 AM
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          Hi:
          Enjoyed you storage tip for old photos. I would like to suggest, however, you
          use archival storage bags made of poly carbonate material rather then plastic
          food bags which are made of poly vinyl chloride. The chloride may give off
          chlorine gas with time and ruin the photos.
          Harry
        • Susan B. Farmer
          ... Food bags are made of polyethylene not PVC. PVC is not considered safe for food -- let alone film or photos! Susan ... Susan Baker Farmer
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 3 12:16 PM
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            >
            >Hi:
            >Enjoyed you storage tip for old photos. I would like to suggest, however, you
            >use archival storage bags made of poly carbonate material rather then plastic
            >food bags which are made of poly vinyl chloride. The chloride may give off
            >chlorine gas with time and ruin the photos.
            >Harry

            Food bags are made of polyethylene not PVC. PVC is not considered safe
            for food -- let alone film or photos!

            Susan
            -----
            Susan Baker Farmer
            sfarmer@...
            http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Genealogy
            VA/KY: Austin, Baker, Carico, Damron, Gentry, Henegar, Horn, Kilgore,
            Lambert, Lane, Maynard, McPeek, Stallard, Wells
            TN: Farmer, Haskins, Russell Wright
            AL/GA: Baker, Childers, Minton, Owens, Rousseau, Swords, Vance
          • Jackson
            ... I use proper plastic sleeving for old prints and papers, but I always try to get rid of the mold first by drying out the material. A spot in a low
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 3 6:55 PM
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              At 06:33 AM 4/3/02, you wrote:
              >This tip was in my 'Ancestry Daily News' of April 2, 2002. I thought I
              >remembered someone suggesting never to store photos in ziploc bags - and
              >the addition of a chemical packet doesn't sound any better to me. I would
              >like to reply to the newsletter if someone can give me good advice to
              >share. Here is the text:
              >
              >
              >DESICCANT PACKAGES TO SOAK UP MOLD SPORES
              >
              >Here's my genealogy quick tip:
              >I inherited a treasured box of one-hundred-year old photos.
              >Unfortunately, they had been stored badly. Rodents had gotten to
              >them, as well as mold and mildew. I coughed and wheezed whenever I
              >opened the box to copy these lovely old photographs. I put them
              >together in bundles according to families, in zip lock plastic bags.
              >Now, whenever I finish a bottle of vitamins, I take the desiccant
              >package enclosed in each bottle and put it into each "envelope" of
              >photos. It worked magic. Now, I can safely open a bag, take out the
              >photo and copy it without feeling ill.

              I use proper plastic sleeving for old prints and papers, but I always try
              to get rid of the mold first by drying out the material. A spot in a low
              humidity area, for one deep layering of the material will stop the mold for
              awhile, but it will return when the material is allowed to get
              moist. Trying to brush it off, can cause damage. I have over 200 prints
              from the 1800's, and have found a cool, dry and dark storage drawer seems
              to work the best, with dividers between the prints.

              If you use google,com, and look for picture presentation, you will get a
              very long list. There are a lot of bad ideas, but a lot of good sites, run
              by libraries and other sites that archive tons of items with good advice to
              use.

              Shakey Jack
            • Jackson
              Looked in my old lists, and found this site at Stanford. We worked with them when I was at UCBerk. http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/ Shakey Jack
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 3 8:03 PM
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                Looked in my old lists, and found this site at Stanford. We worked with
                them when I was at UCBerk.

                http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/

                Shakey Jack



                >I use proper plastic sleeving for old prints and papers, but I always try
                >to get rid of the mold first by drying out the material. A spot in a low
                >humidity area, for one deep layering of the material will stop the mold for
                >awhile, but it will return when the material is allowed to get
                >moist. Trying to brush it off, can cause damage. I have over 200 prints
                >from the 1800's, and have found a cool, dry and dark storage drawer seems
                >to work the best, with dividers between the prints.
                >
                >If you use google,com, and look for picture presentation, you will get a
                >very long list. There are a lot of bad ideas, but a lot of good sites, run
                >by libraries and other sites that archive tons of items with good advice to
                >use.
                >
                >Shakey Jack
                >
                >
                >
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