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2340Re: Glue

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  • Historic Photo Archive
    Dec 13, 2004
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      There is no such thing as archival tape or glue, archival mounting means
      that any procedure to the photograph is fully reversible. Use archival
      corners made by Light Impressions cat # 5264, cost is $7.95 for 200, check
      their shipping rates because they have those annoying handling fees. This
      product is available in most art supply stores, which might be cheaper and
      easier for you. It does not damage the photograph and IMHO works very well.

      The only tape that is widely accepted among professional photograph
      conservators is the Filmoplast P, which is about $20 a roll. This tape is
      not very sticky. If you have borderless prints, it is not recommended.

      The ATG double sided adhesive is the most widely used product for this
      application by professional picture framers. However no double sided tape
      is considered safe for photographs, even though it is "acid free".

      From a practical standpoint, if you are selling photographs and don't care
      how long they last, then use the ATG because it is the cheapest and easiest
      solution. If you want the photo's life expectancy to be at least as long as
      your children's, then avoid all glues, tape and adhesives on either side of
      photographs.

      One additional point about the mounting paper, do not use a "buffered" paper
      for modern color prints. Although most photographs made from 1900 to 1960
      are best preserved on buffered paper, some react against it. Most widely
      used brands of color paper found at 4x6 labs suffer accelerated red fading
      from contact with alkaline buffered paper. Color prints on RC paper need
      neutral ph.

      If life expectancy of your prints is an issue, check the paper type that
      your photofinisher uses and see if it is permanent, i think right now that
      the Fuji and Konica papers are the most permanent, and Agfa and Kodak are
      the least permanent.

      Good luck

      Tom Robinson
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