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[genpcfr] Re: 18th and 19th Century Naming Convention

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  • Ruth Coward Cunningham
    You had Volume!, by mistake, but the quote is from Volume 1 (1761-1785). In the section HELPS FOR THE AMATEUR GENEALOGIST it is on the 4th page under PEOPLE
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 19, 1999
      You had Volume!, by mistake, but the quote is from Volume 1 (1761-1785). In
      the section HELPS FOR THE AMATEUR GENEALOGIST it is on the 4th page under
      PEOPLE WITH THE SAME NAMES. .
      COWARD, ROBERTS, EDWARDS
      Ruth Coward Cunningham

      prytherch@... wrote:

      > Recently, there have been a few references to the tendency of our
      > ancestors to use the same given names repeatedly within a family
      > posted to the list. I would like to share a quote from Volume ! of
      > Judith DuPree Ellison's INDEX AND ABSTRACTS OF DEEDS OF
      > RECORD OF PITT COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA. This comes
      > from a section named "HELPS FOR THE AMATEUR
      > GENEALOGIST", but the page is not numbered.
      >
      > "One pitfall for the amateur geneaologist is the assumption that the
      > same name (first and last) indicates the same person. However, it
      > was not unusual for four or five persons with the same name to be
      > living at the same time in the same town. The isolation and
      > identification of each individual requires careful and painstaking
      > research, and sometimes cannot be done with certainty.
      >
      > A common method of naming children in the 18th and 19th
      > centuries was as follows: the first son was named after the father's
      > father, the second son was named after the mother's father, and
      > subsequent sons were named after uncles and friends; the first
      > daughter was named after the mother's mother, the second
      > daughter was named after the father's mother and younger
      > daughters were named after aunts and friends. Following this
      > procedure in an example, then, produces this very confusing
      > situation.
      >
      > LEWIS ARNOLD (1750-1830) (son of William & Sabrina) marries
      > MARY STEVENS (1745-1815) (daugher of John and Ann)
      >
      > They have four children who each have one child.
      > 1. William Arnold (1775-1845)
      > Son - Lewis Arnold (1800-1870)
      > 2. John Arnold ( 1777-1842)
      > Son - Lewis Arnold (1803-1873)
      > 3. James Arnold (1780-1850)
      > Son - Lewis Arnold (1810-1860)
      > 4. Ann Arnold m. Isaac Ellis
      > Daugher - Mary Ellis
      >
      > Thus, between the years of 1824 and 1830, there are three Lewis
      > Arnolds living all 21 years and over. Between the years of 1831
      > and 1860, there are also three Lewis Arnolds living; hovever, these
      > three are not the same as the previous three just mentioned. The
      > problem of the genealogist is to determine if a particular Lewis
      > Arnold is the Lewis, son of William (1750-1830), or Lewis, son of
      > the younger William (1800-1870), or Lewis, son of John or Lewis,
      > son of James. Aiding him in this effort are marks used in signing
      > papers, names of brothers and sisters, occupations, and middle
      > names, which began to appear about the turn of the nineteenth
      > century. Names of wives are sometimes helpful in making
      > identifications, although here again names are often duplicated.
      > There were many Susannahs, Sarahs, Annes, and Elizabeths in
      > those days!"
      >
      > NOTE: I had to change the format of the chart to e-mail it.
      >
      > Judith DuPree Ellison went on to point out the importance of
      > checking information beyond the names in deeds, and other
      > records to pinpoint the person you are seeking. Information such
      > as names of witnesses, neighboring owners of property and the
      > amount paid for the property. Property passing between relatives
      > often was given ' "in consideration of the love, good will and
      > affection I bear toward my son, etc." ' or for less than market value.
      > to a relative.
      >
      > After reading this, I understood why half my father's male ancestors
      > seemed to be named Noah.
      >
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