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Women's 19th Century Property Rights

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  • Jo Prytherch
    A few weeks ago, someone had a question about the term Free Trader as applying to a woman in the 1800 s. I mentioned a book I own, but could not find as
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 1, 2000
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      A few weeks ago, someone had a question about the term "Free
      Trader" as applying to a woman in the 1800's. I mentioned a book I
      own, but could not find as being a good source of information on
      women's rights in NC.

      Today I found the book in a stack of NC related books I keep in my
      guest room for the entertainment of out of state guests. The book is
      BY HER OWN BOOTSTRAPS: A SAGA OF WOMEN IN NORTH
      CAROLINA by Albert Coates, a Professor Emeritus in the UNC
      Law School. The book is about women's rights in general - not just
      property rights as I had remembered it.

      BY HER OWN BOOTSTRAPS must have been privately published.
      There is no mention of a publisher in the book. It was copywrited in
      1975 by Professor Coates. My daughter bought the book when
      she was taking a course in business law at UNC in the early '80's.
      Perhaps the University Book Store would be familiar with it.

      The book is very well done and does not look like it is privately
      published. There are brief biographies of Cornelia Phillips
      Spencer, Sallie Southall Cotten, Ellen Black Winston, and Judge
      Susie Sharpe.

      Jo ROBERSON Prytherch
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